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(Bloomberg)   Adidas profits run ahead of expectations (link fixed)   (bloomberg.com) divider line 8
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203 clicks; posted to Business » on 01 May 2012 at 6:24 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-05-01 08:22:20 PM
All Day I Dream About Spreadsheets?
 
2012-05-02 05:00:15 AM
They sponsor the Tel Aviv and the Jerusalem marathons. Great events, both. I don't know if the company is responsible for it, but this year the chips were imbedded in adhesive strips attached to the back of the bibs, an excellent idea.

Don't wear Adidas shoes, personally, although their socks are some of the few I've found that don't raise blisters.
 
2012-05-02 09:44:19 AM

Nogale: They sponsor the Tel Aviv and the Jerusalem marathons. Great events, both. I don't know if the company is responsible for it, but this year the chips were imbedded in adhesive strips attached to the back of the bibs, an excellent idea.

Don't wear Adidas shoes, personally, although their socks are some of the few I've found that don't raise blisters.


The timing strips have nothing to do with Adidas (or anyone who sponsers a race). The 400 person 10k I did last weekend had the same strips. I think that method still has some more errors than the ones you lace though your shoes; but all are light years better than what we used 15 years ago for timing.

Outside of soccer though, where does Adidas get all their money? Nobody runs in them, I don't think they are a force in football. Basketball?
 
2012-05-02 02:12:35 PM

bacongood: Nogale: They sponsor the Tel Aviv and the Jerusalem marathons. Great events, both. I don't know if the company is responsible for it, but this year the chips were imbedded in adhesive strips attached to the back of the bibs, an excellent idea.

Don't wear Adidas shoes, personally, although their socks are some of the few I've found that don't raise blisters.

The timing strips have nothing to do with Adidas (or anyone who sponsers a race). The 400 person 10k I did last weekend had the same strips. I think that method still has some more errors than the ones you lace though your shoes; but all are light years better than what we used 15 years ago for timing.

Outside of soccer though, where does Adidas get all their money? Nobody runs in them, I don't think they are a force in football. Basketball?


What DID you do for timing 15 years ago? I just got into running two years ago, so all the nice computer gadgets were already up and running. How would you get exact times for a 10k event in which 15,000 participated? (The first race I ever ran in.)

In her memoir, Kathrine Switzer describes the logjams at the finish line when running started becoming popular. Can't imagine how frustrating that would be.
 
2012-05-02 04:39:29 PM

Nogale: What DID you do for timing 15 years ago? I just got into running two years ago, so all the nice computer gadgets were already up and running. How would you get exact times for a 10k event in which 15,000 participated? (The first race I ever ran in.)

In her memoir, Kathrine Switzer describes the logjams at the finish line when running started becoming popular. Can't imagine how frustrating that would be.


Most of my running pre-chips was in high school. There, we would use a chute; imagine a very small finish line where only one person could fit in at a time. Every time someone crossed that small line, the time person would click and record a time. Once you got in the chute, someone would rip your tag off your number (a lot of numbers still have these tags, but now you are supposed to put medical info on them). After the race was over, they would sync up the list of times with the numbers. You would get the logjam when something happened in the chute (runner passes out, or just stands there). Thus, it was very important to keep the line moving - helping some walk, having people who could stand in the place of a runner who needed medical help, etc.

But, even if things went smoothly, there is clearly a limit on how fast you can detag runners and get them out of the chute; and if the rate of finishers is higher, you can get a jam. So often in a big race (100+ runners) there would be two or more chutes next to each other. When you hit a gap in finishers, you switched which chute the runners went in to. When the 2nd one started to fill up, you switched back to the first. You just keep the collected tags seperate.

Throughout this, someone would take random check times: runner 56 finished in 15:35; runner 89 finished in 16:41, etc. These were used as check against things like phantom times (timer got pushed without a finisher) or chute mess ups. Ideally, the finish line was being video taped as a fall back as well.

Some races would have a larger finish line. There, spotters would guide the runners into the chutes a couple feet behind the line and have you enter in the order they determined you finished. But, basically the same thing.

Local races had most of the simliar problems/methods. Generally, the finishing rate is lower in a local 5k (times range from 15-60 minutes) than a 5k high school race (14-19 for the varsity boys race), so you maybe did not need as many chutes. But if you have a big enough race, your rate will get up there and you start doing the same things. Also, they may have multiple finish lines where each one worked independently, and you just merged all the results together.

A local race usually had more issues post finish line - adults are less likely to dutifully stand in line than a high school kid on a team. Also, bandits (unregistered runners without numbers) made a much larger headache as they created phantom times.

So yeah, the logjams were frustrating, but really the big headache was the post race stuff of matching times to numbers. And most devestating, before chips there were no chip times - only gun times. That's right, the time it took you to get to the start line counted against you always. Now it usually only matters for the overall winner.
 
2012-05-03 05:21:43 AM

bacongood: Nogale: What DID you do for timing 15 years ago? I just got into running two years ago, so all the nice computer gadgets were already up and running. How would you get exact times for a 10k event in which 15,000 participated? (The first race I ever ran in.)

In her memoir, Kathrine Switzer describes the logjams at the finish line when running started becoming popular. Can't imagine how frustrating that would be.

Most of my running pre-chips was in high school. There, we would use a chute; imagine a very small finish line where only one person could fit in at a time. Every time someone crossed that small line, the time person would click and record a time. Once you got in the chute, someone would rip your tag off your number (a lot of numbers still have these tags, but now you are supposed to put medical info on them). After the race was over, they would sync up the list of times with the numbers. You would get the logjam when something happened in the chute (runner passes out, or just stands there). Thus, it was very important to keep the line moving - helping some walk, having people who could stand in the place of a runner who needed medical help, etc.

But, even if things went smoothly, there is clearly a limit on how fast you can detag runners and get them out of the chute; and if the rate of finishers is higher, you can get a jam. So often in a big race (100+ runners) there would be two or more chutes next to each other. When you hit a gap in finishers, you switched which chute the runners went in to. When the 2nd one started to fill up, you switched back to the first. You just keep the collected tags seperate.

Throughout this, someone would take random check times: runner 56 finished in 15:35; runner 89 finished in 16:41, etc. These were used as check against things like phantom times (timer got pushed without a finisher) or chute mess ups. Ideally, the finish line was being video taped as a fall back as well.

Some races would have a larger fini ...


I just found out that for the last year and a half, I've been checking gun times, not chip times. Luckily, all my results are still on record. Sometimes - not always, but sometimes - technology FTW. It's kind of nice to learn you were faster than you thought.
 
2012-05-03 08:48:42 AM

Nogale:
I just found out that for the last year and a half, I've been checking gun times, not chip times. Luckily, all my results are still on record. Sometimes - not always, but sometimes - technology FTW. It's kind of nice to learn you were faster than you thought.


yeah, gun time only matters for the overall winner. Most races do age groups by chip time. Boston qualifying is done by chip time. Use the chip time as your PR; you don't even need to qualify it, everyone knows that you likely mean chip.
 
2012-05-03 08:55:00 AM
I assume this profit was made thanks to the crappy, cheap fabrication they utilise in their Superstars range of shoes. They last about a day for each quid you spend on them.
 
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