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(Newburyport News)   How desperate is New Jersey for income? They're going after a $73 unemployment overpayment to a teenager in 1977   (newburyportnews.com) divider line 28
    More: Asinine, New Jersey, bad debts, Newburyport, Amesbury, Wile E. Coyote, doctoral degree, unemployment checks, Teamsters  
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1541 clicks; posted to Business » on 01 May 2012 at 8:11 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-05-01 08:21:42 AM
She doesn't plan on paying the debt because she hasn't seen any explanation on how the state of New Jersey came about this error.

Good for her, I wouldn't pay it either. I would make them prove to me that I owe and have them show me exactly how, even if it means going to court, which after all of this time I doubt they can do. Because this sounds a little fishy, kind of like those schemes with those debt collection companies that will go after people to make them pay a very old debt, even though it was paid off years before.
 
2012-05-01 08:24:42 AM
She's wearing a "Cool Story, Bro" hoodie, so my guess is that she'll be trolling the state of NJ for quite a bit of time if they do decide to go after the money.
 
2012-05-01 08:25:49 AM

degenerate-afro: She's wearing a "Cool Story, BroBabe" hoodie, so my guess is that she'll be trolling the state of NJ for quite a bit of time if they do decide to go after the money.


FTFM
 
2012-05-01 08:34:39 AM
The question is -- does the state have to abide by the statute of limitations on collecting debt like any other creditor (in which case, tell them to go fark themselves)?
 
2012-05-01 08:39:00 AM

meanmutton: The question is -- does the state have to abide by the statute of limitations on collecting debt like any other creditor (in which case, tell them to go fark themselves)?


FTFA:
New Jersey Department of Labor spokeswoman Kerri H. Gatling said there is no bad debt "write-off" in unemployment insurance law.

"Once a debt is established, it remains in effect until repaid. When we get a new, valid address, we send a refund notice to that new address," Gatling said.
 
2012-05-01 08:43:12 AM

dittybopper: meanmutton: The question is -- does the state have to abide by the statute of limitations on collecting debt like any other creditor (in which case, tell them to go fark themselves)?

FTFA:
New Jersey Department of Labor spokeswoman Kerri H. Gatling said there is no bad debt "write-off" in unemployment insurance law.

"Once a debt is established, it remains in effect until repaid. When we get a new, valid address, we send a refund notice to that new address," Gatling said.


This is why you make them prove that you owe the debt and make them show how it was incurred, with documentation. Because after all of this time I doubt they can do that.

I wouldn't put it past that fat fark they have for Governor in NJ to try a scheme to trick millions into paying what they may think is a trivial amount.
 
2012-05-01 08:43:14 AM

dittybopper: meanmutton: The question is -- does the state have to abide by the statute of limitations on collecting debt like any other creditor (in which case, tell them to go fark themselves)?

FTFA:
New Jersey Department of Labor spokeswoman Kerri H. Gatling said there is no bad debt "write-off" in unemployment insurance law.

"Once a debt is established, it remains in effect until repaid. When we get a new, valid address, we send a refund notice to that new address," Gatling said.


Yeah, except that's the governmental agency which is trying to collect the debt. A neutral third party would be helpful.
 
2012-05-01 08:43:18 AM

dittybopper: meanmutton: The question is -- does the state have to abide by the statute of limitations on collecting debt like any other creditor (in which case, tell them to go fark themselves)?

FTFA:
New Jersey Department of Labor spokeswoman Kerri H. Gatling said there is no bad debt "write-off" in unemployment insurance law.

"Once a debt is established, it remains in effect until repaid. When we get a new, valid address, we send a refund notice to that new address," Gatling said.


How much time and money will be spent in attempting to collect and dispute this?
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2012-05-01 08:56:16 AM
They may revoke her driver's license until she pays. The vast majority of New Jersey license suspensions are for debt, not bad driving. If New Jersey takes her license (aka "right to operate") away her new home state of Massachusetts will do the same.
 
2012-05-01 09:06:54 AM
New Jersey isn't desperate for income, subby. They'd do this if they had a $50 billion surplus.
 
2012-05-01 09:15:44 AM

ZAZ: They may revoke her driver's license until she pays. The vast majority of New Jersey license suspensions are for debt, not bad driving. If New Jersey takes her license (aka "right to operate") away her new home state of Massachusetts will do the same.


wat

I've never heard of such a thing. Mass would have no reason at all to do that, especially if she has a vaild Mass. license.
 
2012-05-01 09:27:34 AM
Someone has to cover Governor Tubbys donut tab for Monday.
 
2012-05-01 09:29:03 AM

HotWingConspiracy: ZAZ: They may revoke her driver's license until she pays. The vast majority of New Jersey license suspensions are for debt, not bad driving. If New Jersey takes her license (aka "right to operate") away her new home state of Massachusetts will do the same.

wat

I've never heard of such a thing. Mass would have no reason at all to do that, especially if she has a vaild Mass. license.


This is done with Indiana and Illinois, and I think it is also done with Illinois and Wisconsin also. The reason was is that people were getting their licenses revoked or suspended for DUI's and then moving across state lines to get one in a border state. I know this was happening alot with people in the Chicago area and North West Indiana area because you can drive between those two areas in about an hour in good traffic. Anyway now any license suspension is reported in both states.
 
2012-05-01 09:41:05 AM
A couple of years ago, one friend of mine on Long Island just got a summons for a parking ticket that they claimed was unanswered from 1989!

They're all getting desperate, it seems.
 
2012-05-01 09:53:07 AM
The idiots in New Jersey are probably paying 100k per year to store all of those old records. Take the loss and set up a limit of 8 yrs and be done with it and save the money.
 
2012-05-01 09:53:40 AM
That's sure to land them in the black. Waste untold amounts of money to recover what will essentially be pennies on the dollar.
 
2012-05-01 10:08:45 AM
And this will cost them how many tens of thousands to collect?
 
2012-05-01 10:38:29 AM

ongbok: HotWingConspiracy: ZAZ: They may revoke her driver's license until she pays. The vast majority of New Jersey license suspensions are for debt, not bad driving. If New Jersey takes her license (aka "right to operate") away her new home state of Massachusetts will do the same.

wat

I've never heard of such a thing. Mass would have no reason at all to do that, especially if she has a vaild Mass. license.

This is done with Indiana and Illinois, and I think it is also done with Illinois and Wisconsin also. The reason was is that people were getting their licenses revoked or suspended for DUI's and then moving across state lines to get one in a border state. I know this was happening alot with people in the Chicago area and North West Indiana area because you can drive between those two areas in about an hour in good traffic. Anyway now any license suspension is reported in both states.


DC, Maryland and Virginia do the same thing and if you get points in one they will go on your license as well.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2012-05-01 10:39:52 AM
HotWingConspiracy

Most states agree to impose reciprocal license suspensions. Effectiveness of enforcement varies between each pair of states. For example, New York rarely reports suspensions for speeding tickets out of state. Massachusetts and New Hampshire actively exchange records due to heavy commuting traffic. The National Driver Register is supposed to move us to a suspended anywhere = suspended everywhere model.
 
2012-05-01 11:05:44 AM
assets.diylol.com
 
2012-05-01 11:23:32 AM
She left NJ after High School. SMART. Moved to Massachusetts. YOU ARE DOING IT WRONG!

If I were here I would tell NJ to piss off.
 
2012-05-01 12:41:16 PM
Gotta pay for Christie's corporate wlefare somehow.
 
2012-05-01 06:51:53 PM

groppet: ongbok: HotWingConspiracy: ZAZ: They may revoke her driver's license until she pays. The vast majority of New Jersey license suspensions are for debt, not bad driving. If New Jersey takes her license (aka "right to operate") away her new home state of Massachusetts will do the same.

wat

I've never heard of such a thing. Mass would have no reason at all to do that, especially if she has a vaild Mass. license.

This is done with Indiana and Illinois, and I think it is also done with Illinois and Wisconsin also. The reason was is that people were getting their licenses revoked or suspended for DUI's and then moving across state lines to get one in a border state. I know this was happening alot with people in the Chicago area and North West Indiana area because you can drive between those two areas in about an hour in good traffic. Anyway now any license suspension is reported in both states.

DC, Maryland and Virginia do the same thing and if you get points in one they will go on your license as well.


It's that way for all states. A suspension in one = a suspension in all. All that has to happen is, in her case, NJ reports to MA that her license is suspended in NJ. MA will just slap "suspended" on her driving record until she clears the suspension with NJ.
 
2012-05-01 07:37:20 PM

dustman81: groppet: ongbok: HotWingConspiracy: ZAZ: They may revoke her driver's license until she pays. The vast majority of New Jersey license suspensions are for debt, not bad driving. If New Jersey takes her license (aka "right to operate") away her new home state of Massachusetts will do the same.

wat

I've never heard of such a thing. Mass would have no reason at all to do that, especially if she has a vaild Mass. license.

This is done with Indiana and Illinois, and I think it is also done with Illinois and Wisconsin also. The reason was is that people were getting their licenses revoked or suspended for DUI's and then moving across state lines to get one in a border state. I know this was happening alot with people in the Chicago area and North West Indiana area because you can drive between those two areas in about an hour in good traffic. Anyway now any license suspension is reported in both states.

DC, Maryland and Virginia do the same thing and if you get points in one they will go on your license as well.

It's that way for all states. A suspension in one = a suspension in all. All that has to happen is, in her case, NJ reports to MA that her license is suspended in NJ. MA will just slap "suspended" on her driving record until she clears the suspension with NJ.


In Texas, you can at least ask for a administrative hearing. Owing another state government money would most likely not preclude you from obtaining a license in Texas.

Of course, you could always just obtain one of those Mexican matricula ID cards and head over to New Mexico, pretend you are an illegal alien and obtain one that way.
 
2012-05-01 07:56:54 PM
California tried coming after me and several fellow employees for supposedly having taken a deduction for an ineligible IRA contribution when we were working for a company that had a retirement plan. I'm pleased that I buried them in correspondence and haggling, and finally made them go away after I photocopied the employee handbook to illustrate that, having been there less than a year, I was ineligible for the retirement plan. I'm sure I burned up enough bureaucrats' time that they'd have netted a loss even if they had prevailed. Unfortunately the other employees didn't have my tenacity, caved in and paid.
 
2012-05-01 09:15:04 PM

meanmutton: The question is -- does the state have to abide by the statute of limitations on collecting debt like any other creditor (in which case, tell them to go fark themselves)?


It wouldn't be statute of limitations. It would be laches. Laches is a "super" statute of limitation. No matter what, no matter what reason, no matter whether the debt was never discovered or not, there must be laches on it. Laches for any debt usually tops out at 5-7 years. Statute of limitations, meh 2-5 years. Statute of limitations can be tolled if the complained of action is not discovered until later, or for several other reasons. But laches can never, ever be tolled.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2012-05-01 10:31:53 PM
halB

In some states laches does not apply against the government.
 
2012-05-01 11:51:03 PM
i'm a NJ farker. after a BIL passed away my sis tried to donate his Caddy to several charities, no takers. i wound up with the car.

a few months after putting the Caddy on the road i received a threatening letter from some NJ taxation division. they claimed the car was worth a nice chunk of money and insisted i send them a check. if i didn't comply i'd be screwed when it came time to renew my drivers license.

don't know when the law was changed but previously it was illegal for non-related state gov't entities to share such information.

/thanks Governor FatAss
//Pennsylvania is looking more attractive with every passing year
 
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