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(MSNBC)   "Oh, hi doc. Whatcha doin?" "Surgery on your collapsed lung. Go back to sleep"   (vitals.msnbc.msn.com ) divider line
    More: Scary, Whatcha Doin', heart surgery, Linda Carroll, anesthesiologists, quality of lives, Hawaii, National Board of Health, lungs  
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14951 clicks; posted to Main » on 30 Apr 2012 at 12:00 PM (4 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-04-30 01:19:10 PM  
Listen pal, you should be thankful . . . some people never wake up. Sheesh, what an ingrate.
 
2012-04-30 01:21:53 PM  
Fun fact: during certain brain surgeries (only a few? most? all? no clue), the patient is kept deliberately conscious and talking so that the doctors can figure out if they're starting to cut something important.
 
2012-04-30 01:24:42 PM  

chewielouie: Listen pal, you should be thankful . . . some people never wake up. Sheesh, what an ingrate.


Right?

I had difficulty with "induction" (first time for everything) and then did the headline - "Blink!" "Go back to sleep" "blink"

Guy did a great job. Shoulda tipped 'im.
 
2012-04-30 01:30:23 PM  

Wicked Chinchilla: Diogenes: I wake up before I wake up from anesthesia. But then again, I can sleep with my eyes open and carry on conversations when I'm asleep.

Mom took me for my last wisdom tooth extraction where I went under. I don't remember events afterwards until we were already in the car and on the way home. But she tells me it was like I hopped off the bed and exclaimed I was ready to go home and started walking out the door on my own power.

Similar for my hernia. But the muscle pain thing kept me in check.

Difference between me and this guy is I'm not aware of what's going on. It's more like my brain goes on autopilot.

Haven't had any issues with anasthetics yet (haven't had anything done but my wisdom teeth extracted) but I apparently have changed quite a multitude of diapers, quieted children many times, and carried on full seemingly alert conversations completely asleep. And apparently my "sleep" personality is a bit of an asswhole too, I have been told I can be exceedingly mean. To be fair, the stuff I have been told I said is shockingly blunt and they are things I would never have said if conscious.


Mom's mean when she's in that "mode." I get the zombie state and open eyes things from her.

The open eyes used to freak out my fraternity brothers. They thought I was going to get up and murder them in their sleep.

Not that I hadn't considered it once or twice.
 
2012-04-30 01:34:34 PM  
My former boss had a quadruple bypass surgery performed and he woke up during the procedure. Said he felt no pain, couldn't move, but was completely awake. He said he truly thought he died. 10 years later, he still has nightmares about it.
 
2012-04-30 01:39:01 PM  
I had surgery to correct a badly deviated septum (that stiff stuff in the center of your nose) and I came to but could not speak or move while the doc was grinding at the cartilege with a chisel. Talk about PAIN! I told the doc about it later and he told me I must have had a bad dream and I told him about him and the anesthesia guy talking about their golf games....his face turned white!

I still have nightmares about that one and it was 30 years ago.

Also woke up during the middle of a tooth extraction and the doc asked me if I wanted to "go ahead". I thought he meant he would knock me out again, WRONG! So he starts yanking on this tooth and he is putting all his weight against it and the farker wouldn't move. Found out later that the roots were curved and didn't show on the x-ray.

Now I tell every doc about it and threaten to SUE them if I wake up during anything!!!

Now a nurse "friend" told me that often when people wake up during surgery it is because the doctors are using the gas to get high!!!! WTF?!?
 
2012-04-30 01:44:56 PM  
Oh yay another thing to worry about when my fiance has his surgery for cervical spinal stenosis besides the possible complications. I imagine it'd be hell to wake up in the middle of someone poking around in your neck to fix your spine.
 
2012-04-30 01:46:53 PM  
I woke up when I was getting my wisdom teeth pulled last year. Enough to where I could move my arm and try to show that I was waking up. Didn't stay awake long, so I'm guessing they got the hint and gave me a little more anesthetic
 
2012-04-30 01:48:18 PM  
there is a cocktail that does three things:

1) put you to sleep
2) paralyzes you (prevents you from moving anything)
3) anesthetizes you (prevents you from feeling pain)

You don't want a situation where 1 isn't working, 3 isn't working but 2 is working. if that is an hour-long surgery, that is going to be one long hour.
 
2012-04-30 01:48:28 PM  
I've had 4 upper endoscopies, and I believe during the 3rd one I started waking up. That was an odd day though - I didn't fall asleep as soon as I had in the previous procedures. I remember the tube coming at my mouth, and then I passed out. Normally I'm out well before then. And after the procedure, I found out that they had to give me more drugs because I started waking up during. Thankfully I don't remember any of it. But whatever heavy sedation they administer for those procedures *usually* knocks me the eff out for the rest of the day. In fact, after my last endoscopy, I remember being in recovery and the nurse sternly telling me to wake up. Apparently I don't like waking up after having those drugs. The couple of times that I've had general anesthesia, I've had no problems with waking up too soon, or being out too long, or anything. So that's good. Especially since I'm having surgery again this summer, l and I really don't want to wake up while they've got sharp objects up my nose.
 
2012-04-30 01:54:59 PM  

JackieRabbit: I actually had this happen once, though I wasn't under general anesthesia. I was put under with pentathol for a procedure that was only supposed to take about 20 minutes. Well, they had a problem and it actually took about an hour and a half. At some point, the pentathol began to wear off and I started waking. THere was some pain and it was very, very strange. I heard the doc say something about a bit more pentathol, but he sounded like he was in another room. Then nighty-night again.

I can't imagine how horrible it must be to awaken during general anesthesia, since there are two components: sedation and paralyzing the patient. You cannot move, so unless the anesthesiologist is paying close attention, a patient can become terrified during a major procedure.


Whatever anesthetic they had me under for dental surgery had a dissociative effect. I wasn't keenly aware of what was going on, and it wasn't entirely clear that it was happening to me. It was like I was watching a movie scene that was taken from the perspective of the nameless protagonist's field of vision. While half asleep and three sheets to the wind.
 
2012-04-30 01:59:13 PM  
if he is a red head, or has the MC1R gene, then this is a "common" issue. We are resistant to certain types of anesthesia, so we "wake up" on the table fairly often, actually to the point where some surgeons will hesitate to operate on us :-/
 
2012-04-30 02:03:56 PM  
Goals of general anesthesia are: Sedation, analgesia, amnesia and paralysis (including muscle relaxation). Your typical cocktail of drugs for GA will include propafol (which will basically increase the duration of analgesia and cause central nervous system depression - it's the stuff MJ OD'd on), fentanyl (your basic analgesic), diazepam (to lower anxiety pre-op), and rocuronium (to paralyze and relax your skeletal muscles, your diaphragm included, which is why operative patients are typically ventilated). To be able to 'talk' while ventilated is...unlikely, but some orthopedic procedures really don't require much muscle relaxation. General surgery procedures on the other hand are another story.
Typically after the afore listed medications are injected, the oxygen mask you have been huffing away at upon request of the anesthetist is switched to oxygen + sevflourane/desflourane/isoflourane or even good old fashioned nitro for short procedures. The advent and propagation of inhaled sedatives have been a god send to GA, now we don't have to monitor propafol infusions and can rapidly adjust based on patient telemetry.
If a patient's blood pressure drops during surgery to 'less than desirable' levels, the amount of 'gas' will be turned down. We'd rather you not stroke out due to lack of perfusion to your brain. During these instances, a patient very rarely loses sedation, but losing analgesia is...damn near unheard of. You know the guy/girl at the party that crashes on your couch because they hammered back 8 shots of flaming sambuka? Yeah, sans the ethanol poisoning, that's where you're at when and if you are not 'sedated'.
Scary part though, is the fact that due to you still being paralyzed and the GABA receptors in your brain still being blocked by analgesia (along with your reflex pathways), your vitals will read normal until either: a) you go back to 'sleep', or b) you break out of anesthesia enough to shift, or cause your vitals to change, at which point, inhalation agents be damned, you're getting hit with more doses of IV anesthesia.
Your best bet is just to relax. Rest assured that before you feel any pain, your diaphragm will start working and that will register on the ventilator as a 'subtle at first, but rather obvious in two minutes indication' that the anesthetist needs to hit you with the good stuff again.
Hope this helps.
Cheers, lunch break is over. Back to work it is.
 
2012-04-30 02:08:18 PM  

indylaw: JackieRabbit: I actually had this happen once, though I wasn't under general anesthesia. I was put under with pentathol for a procedure that was only supposed to take about 20 minutes. Well, they had a problem and it actually took about an hour and a half. At some point, the pentathol began to wear off and I started waking. THere was some pain and it was very, very strange. I heard the doc say something about a bit more pentathol, but he sounded like he was in another room. Then nighty-night again.

I can't imagine how horrible it must be to awaken during general anesthesia, since there are two components: sedation and paralyzing the patient. You cannot move, so unless the anesthesiologist is paying close attention, a patient can become terrified during a major procedure.

Whatever anesthetic they had me under for dental surgery had a dissociative effect. I wasn't keenly aware of what was going on, and it wasn't entirely clear that it was happening to me. It was like I was watching a movie scene that was taken from the perspective of the nameless protagonist's field of vision. While half asleep and three sheets to the wind.


Sounds like nitrous oxide, which produces a dissociative reaction and euphoria. It's great stuff. If you have little to no memory of the procedure, they may have used Versed on you too.
 
2012-04-30 02:09:28 PM  

fmk040: Goals of general anesthesia are: Sedation, analgesia, amnesia and paralysis (including muscle relaxation). Your typical cocktail of drugs for GA will include propafol (which will basically increase the duration of analgesia and cause central nervous system depression - it's the stuff MJ OD'd on), fentanyl (your basic analgesic), diazepam (to lower anxiety pre-op), and rocuronium (to paralyze and relax your skeletal muscles, your diaphragm included, which is why operative patients are typically ventilated). To be able to 'talk' while ventilated is...unlikely, but some orthopedic procedures really don't require much muscle relaxation. General surgery procedures on the other hand are another story.
Typically after the afore listed medications are injected, the oxygen mask you have been huffing away at upon request of the anesthetist is switched to oxygen + sevflourane/desflourane/isoflourane or even good old fashioned nitro for short procedures. The advent and propagation of inhaled sedatives have been a god send to GA, now we don't have to monitor propafol infusions and can rapidly adjust based on patient telemetry.
If a patient's blood pressure drops during surgery to 'less than desirable' levels, the amount of 'gas' will be turned down. We'd rather you not stroke out due to lack of perfusion to your brain. During these instances, a patient very rarely loses sedation, but losing analgesia is...damn near unheard of. You know the guy/girl at the party that crashes on your couch because they hammered back 8 shots of flaming sambuka? Yeah, sans the ethanol poisoning, that's where you're at when and if you are not 'sedated'.
Scary part though, is the fact that due to you still being paralyzed and the GABA receptors in your brain still being blocked by analgesia (along with your reflex pathways), your vitals will read normal until either: a) you go back to 'sleep', or b) you break out of anesthesia enough to shift, or cause your vitals to change, at which point, in ...


Did you stay at a Holiday Inn last night?
 
2012-04-30 02:09:31 PM  

cannotsuggestaname: if he is a red head, or has the MC1R gene, then this is a "common" issue. We are resistant to certain types of anesthesia, so we "wake up" on the table fairly often, actually to the point where some surgeons will hesitate to operate on us :-/


Fairly common, yes. But there is no reason to hesitate to operate on you. The anesthetists should be fully equipped to deal with any level of sedation and prolongation of anesthesia. I'm sorry for your conundrum, I wish I were better able to understand it.
Do you live in the States or another country with dual/private health care coverage? Do you know if this is more of a liability thing?
 
2012-04-30 02:22:55 PM  

I Like Bread: I was completely conscious when the doctors treated my collapsed lung after my car accident. But I was gassed, and already delirious from nearly suffocating and going through the pain of the accident, so I can't say I felt much. All they really did was poke a hole in my side and stick a tube through, which kind of felt like being punched in the ribs.


Yup same. When I got stabbed multiple times and my lung was punctured, they cut a hole in my side and shoved a chest tube through all while wide awake. I remember feeling pressure, but no pain, as I was in a pretty heightened state of shock.

Then they stuck a pen in my mouth, made me draw an X on a consent form and that's the last thing I remember until I woke up.
 
2012-04-30 02:23:21 PM  

fmk040: cannotsuggestaname: if he is a red head, or has the MC1R gene, then this is a "common" issue. We are resistant to certain types of anesthesia, so we "wake up" on the table fairly often, actually to the point where some surgeons will hesitate to operate on us :-/

Fairly common, yes. But there is no reason to hesitate to operate on you. The anesthetists should be fully equipped to deal with any level of sedation and prolongation of anesthesia. I'm sorry for your conundrum, I wish I were better able to understand it.
Do you live in the States or another country with dual/private health care coverage? Do you know if this is more of a liability thing?


I live in the US, and yes it is a liability thing. We are a litigious society so the simple thought that they may be sued will cause hesitation. I haven't needed any surgery thankfully, but I have had a couple of friends that had surgeons that didn't want to work on them. They both found a good anesthetist/anesthesiologist though so it worked out for them in the end.

I had to have a talk with my new dentist about this issue, since Novocaine does nothing at all for me. I am glad that they are starting to understand what is going on with us a little better, both in pain perception and resistance to certain types of drugs and anesthesia.
 
2012-04-30 02:32:23 PM  

xip_80: In response to some of the tooth extraction comments, they often give you sedatives when they pull teeth (and also for colonoscopies and other similar procedures.) Sedatives don't knock you out on the same level as general anesthetics, but they do make you forget what happened. So even though you don't remember your tooth being pulled, you were probably semi-conscious. General anesthetics completely knock you out, but they don't affect your memory as much once you're conscious again.


When I had 4 wisdom teeth removed where the bottom 2 had to be cut from under the gum, I opted for a mouthful of lidocaine. He was hesitant and didn't want to do that. The doc did the full meal deal including grinding notches into the base of the teeth to have something to yank on. One of the top ones shattered and he was biatching about 'roots like a horse.'

After we were done, he told me that he never actually expected someone to just sit there and take all that for an hour. If he hadn't been yanking my head around so much, I think I could have caught a nap for most of it. I got a 5 refill script for lortab 10s out of the deal back before they could only do a single fill per script on narcotics. Probably have 4 full bottles left just from that time in the med cabinet.
 
2012-04-30 02:32:38 PM  
One of the many reasons Gas Passers make big bucks (even for doctors).
 
2012-04-30 02:33:44 PM  

Alonjar: Wow at the above posts all having the same experience, lol


That's because dental surgery isn't general anesthesia. It's usually some oral surgeon giving you sedating drugs while he works on your teeth. Those "hilarious" youtube videos of drugged up and disoriented kids in the car on the way home from dental surgery horrify anesthesiologists.

Any "I woke up under anesthesia" story that contains the words "I said...." is almost invariably a sedation case and NOT general anesthesia. General anesthesia is typically done with an endotracheal tube (or a similar device) that fits between your vocal cords any precludes any conversation beyond what a pissed off elephant might say.

"Waking up" during a carpal tunnel is pretty normal because those are frequently done with nerve blocks to make the area numb and you only need enough sedation to lay still and to tolerate laying on a hard bed with tourniquet on your arm for 15 minutes.

It is difficult to tell what actually happened to the man in the linked story. There aren't enough details to tell if he really did have "awareness under anesthesia" like you sometimes see in heart and trauma patients or not. I hope he didn't, because that's awful.

/actually a doctor
//actually an anesthesiologist :)
 
2012-04-30 02:34:26 PM  
Not sure what would be worse, the pain of feeling your lungs being worked on, or that fact that you're awake but can't do anything, it's like the ultimate claustrophobic experience.


Kinds of reminds me of that Tales from the Crypt episode called Abra Cadaver where this guy is injected with medicine that feign death, thinking he was dead he's brought into autopsy quite conscience and can feel pain...well for a while at least. *shudders*
 
2012-04-30 02:37:35 PM  

xmasbaby: /actually a doctor
//actually an anesthesiologist :)


Just an FYI, doc... those digital blocks between the knuckles? Like if you're going to work on a crushed finger or the like? Those hurt like a holy motherfarker.

"You're gonna feel a little stick." is bullcrap.
 
2012-04-30 02:38:20 PM  

xmasbaby: Alonjar: Wow at the above posts all having the same experience, lol

That's because dental surgery isn't general anesthesia. It's usually some oral surgeon giving you sedating drugs while he works on your teeth. Those "hilarious" youtube videos of drugged up and disoriented kids in the car on the way home from dental surgery horrify anesthesiologists.

Any "I woke up under anesthesia" story that contains the words "I said...." is almost invariably a sedation case and NOT general anesthesia. General anesthesia is typically done with an endotracheal tube (or a similar device) that fits between your vocal cords any precludes any conversation beyond what a pissed off elephant might say.

"Waking up" during a carpal tunnel is pretty normal because those are frequently done with nerve blocks to make the area numb and you only need enough sedation to lay still and to tolerate laying on a hard bed with tourniquet on your arm for 15 minutes.

It is difficult to tell what actually happened to the man in the linked story. There aren't enough details to tell if he really did have "awareness under anesthesia" like you sometimes see in heart and trauma patients or not. I hope he didn't, because that's awful.

/actually a doctor
//actually an anesthesiologist :)


Farking in the OR?
God, I farking hate you. I have a Whipple's being prepped. Looking to break the 7 1/2 hour mark today...probably not happening.

/general surgery resident
 
2012-04-30 02:40:14 PM  
I had my wisdom teeth out kinda conscious. They gave me an IV drip of Valium, with a nose mask of nitrous oxide. I felt like somebody had taken out all my insides and replaced them with half that volume of wet sand. I got to hear the doc squeek squeek out each of those damn molars. That's a weird damn feeling when the doc grabs your head like he's shoeing a horse and wrestles it around while your former tooth squeeks its way out of your noggin.

I highly recommend Valium and NO2, by the way.
 
2012-04-30 02:52:02 PM  

Diogenes: wisdom tooth extraction


Stabone33: wisdom tooth surgery


indylaw: wisdom tooth extraction


PlatinumDragon: wisdom tooth extraction


crzybtch: tooth extraction


RedPhoenix122: wisdom teeth pulled


Da fark? Your dentist tried to knock you out?

My Dentist only numbed the fark outta my mouth. No one even offered anything more than that. I had to hear every crack, grind, & saw. And I had the fun of watching a not quite 5 ft tall asian lady using all the strength god *didn't* give her to try to yank the damn things out. There were times she had one knee on the armrest and one on my forehead. She looked like she wrestled a bear and somehow won by the time she was done with all four.
 
2012-04-30 02:54:58 PM  

penthesilea: one knee on the armrest and one hand on my forehead


*hand was the missing word there. She didn't have a knee on my head.
 
2012-04-30 03:00:40 PM  

Diogenes: Wicked Chinchilla: Diogenes: I wake up before I wake up from anesthesia. But then again, I can sleep with my eyes open and carry on conversations when I'm asleep.

Mom took me for my last wisdom tooth extraction where I went under. I don't remember events afterwards until we were already in the car and on the way home. But she tells me it was like I hopped off the bed and exclaimed I was ready to go home and started walking out the door on my own power.

Similar for my hernia. But the muscle pain thing kept me in check.

Difference between me and this guy is I'm not aware of what's going on. It's more like my brain goes on autopilot.

Haven't had any issues with anasthetics yet (haven't had anything done but my wisdom teeth extracted) but I apparently have changed quite a multitude of diapers, quieted children many times, and carried on full seemingly alert conversations completely asleep. And apparently my "sleep" personality is a bit of an asswhole too, I have been told I can be exceedingly mean. To be fair, the stuff I have been told I said is shockingly blunt and they are things I would never have said if conscious.

Mom's mean when she's in that "mode." I get the zombie state and open eyes things from her.

The open eyes used to freak out my fraternity brothers. They thought I was going to get up and murder them in their sleep.

Not that I hadn't considered it once or twice.


The worst time was in college because I actually kicked my future wife out of the bed and booted my roommate out of his room because "of the droids". Yes, the droids, The mechanical beings from Star Wars, and no I did not explain further. I woke up the next morning having zero idea of what occured during the night. I was all "why are you guys in the living room." The looks I received upon making this statement could have killed a child.
 
2012-04-30 03:04:42 PM  
I don't get why this seems to be such a phobia for a lot of folks. I mean, I can understand it would suck if it were extremely painful and you couldn't say or do anything about it, but I don't understand exactly what makes being aware that you're in the middle of surgery the stuff of nightmares. I imagine it sort of being like having dental work done. I just kinda tune out what's happening, and have confidence that I'm in the skilled hands of a professional. Nothing to do but wait and enjoy my own thoughts for a while. Heck, I usually have to struggle not to fall asleep while having a cavity filled.
 
2012-04-30 03:05:13 PM  
You know, last year I got a recommendation to have my wisdom teeth removed. After looking over the form I have to sign, as they wanted to put in under GA, I decided I wasn't ok with their plan. This thread only reinforces that.

Thanks for new phobia!
 
2012-04-30 03:11:10 PM  
Yup same. When I got stabbed multiple times and my lung was punctured, they cut a hole in my side and shoved a chest tube through all while wide awake. I remember feeling pressure, but no pain, as I was in a pretty heightened state of shock.


Whoa... a little more story on this one... what did getting stabbed feel like?... etc....
 
2012-04-30 03:14:49 PM  
I do vaguely remember when they cracked one of my impacted wisdom teeth during surgery and maybe the doctor's face/hands, but other than that nothing. I am SO glad general anesthesia kept me under for both my abdominal surgeries though, that would have panicked me.

I was freaking out just recently during a routine mole removal because I could feel the pressure/pulling/slicing on my skin (lower back so kind of a vulnerable feeling area). Had to think about kitties to keep from flipping out...

Also has anyone else had a lasting dizziness after GA? The first time, I got dizzy at random, for several weeks.
 
2012-04-30 03:18:15 PM  

GuidoDelConfuso: I don't get why this seems to be such a phobia for a lot of folks. I mean, I can understand it would suck if it were extremely painful and you couldn't say or do anything about it, but I don't understand exactly what makes being aware that you're in the middle of surgery the stuff of nightmares. I imagine it sort of being like having dental work done. I just kinda tune out what's happening, and have confidence that I'm in the skilled hands of a professional. Nothing to do but wait and enjoy my own thoughts for a while. Heck, I usually have to struggle not to fall asleep while having a cavity filled.


For most surgeries under general anesthesia, being awake would actually be quite painful.

Most of the CSBs in this thread are not describing being awake during surgery under general anesthesia. Most are describing sedations (short of a general) or waking up after surgery a little wild.

/anesthesiologist
 
2012-04-30 03:18:51 PM  

cannotsuggestaname: fmk040: cannotsuggestaname: if he is a red head, or has the MC1R gene, then this is a "common" issue. We are resistant to certain types of anesthesia, so we "wake up" on the table fairly often, actually to the point where some surgeons will hesitate to operate on us :-/

Fairly common, yes. But there is no reason to hesitate to operate on you. The anesthetists should be fully equipped to deal with any level of sedation and prolongation of anesthesia. I'm sorry for your conundrum, I wish I were better able to understand it.
Do you live in the States or another country with dual/private health care coverage? Do you know if this is more of a liability thing?

I live in the US, and yes it is a liability thing. We are a litigious society so the simple thought that they may be sued will cause hesitation. I haven't needed any surgery thankfully, but I have had a couple of friends that had surgeons that didn't want to work on them. They both found a good anesthetist/anesthesiologist though so it worked out for them in the end.

I had to have a talk with my new dentist about this issue, since Novocaine does nothing at all for me. I am glad that they are starting to understand what is going on with us a little better, both in pain perception and resistance to certain types of drugs and anesthesia.


Interesting. I am a redhead and have a very high tolerance for Novocaine and other drugs. Luckily I have never woken up during surgery, but they did have to use pretty high doses.
 
2012-04-30 03:23:47 PM  
I woke up during an ankle surgery back in 2000.
I didn't do the general anesthesia, just and Ankle Block with heavy sedation.
At some point during the surgery, i opened my eyes to the sound of a hammer and chisel tapping away, followed by an intense pain radiating through my foot.

The anesthesiologist asked: "Can you feel that?"
I nodded "yes".

He dropped a heavy dose of something into my IV and I went night night again.

All in all it was about 20-30 seconds (that I can actually recall). But it sucked while it was happening.
 
2012-04-30 03:24:04 PM  

GuidoDelConfuso: I don't get why this seems to be such a phobia for a lot of folks. I mean, I can understand it would suck if it were extremely painful and you couldn't say or do anything about it, but I don't understand exactly what makes being aware that you're in the middle of surgery the stuff of nightmares. I imagine it sort of being like having dental work done. I just kinda tune out what's happening, and have confidence that I'm in the skilled hands of a professional. Nothing to do but wait and enjoy my own thoughts for a while. Heck, I usually have to struggle not to fall asleep while having a cavity filled.


I don't get why it is a phobia of mine, either, but it is. I have had minor surgeries under local, where I could feel tugging and stuff but no pain, and I was fine and quite chatty. Didn't bother me a bit. I had an emergency d&c fully awake (I had eaten so no good stuff) and while I wasn't fine, it wasn't because of the surgical procedure, which was the least of my concerns. I'm not the slightest bit squeamish. I think for me it's the idea of being paralyzed but having sensation and being unable to tell anyone. As long as I can talk to the nurse, I'm fine.

It's the helpless feeling that is so scary, I think. Like why plane crashes are so much scarier than car crashes, even though you are far more likely to die in a car than a plane.
 
2012-04-30 03:24:34 PM  

fmk040: /actually a doctor
//actually an anesthesiologist :)

Farking in the OR?
God, I farking hate you. I have a Whipple's being prepped. Looking to break the 7 1/2 hour mark today...probably not happening.

/general surgery resident


Yeah, I get that a lot :) I'd feel worse for you guys if you got into those residencies by being kidnapped by evil fairies or something, but my understanding is that there's some kind of application process you go through... Is that right?

Do know why there isn't a "It Gets Better" series for general surgeons? Because it doesn't ;)
 
2012-04-30 03:24:54 PM  
Never woken up during a surgery, but the recovery from anesthesia is always pretty quick. Though, I have to say, general anesthesia is hell on your gut. It's the reason they don't want you eating anything the day before - they don't want you vomiting on their nice shiny equipment, or worse, choking to death on your own vomit.

Also, for the sake of gross, look up a Pilonidal cyst. I had to have one removed and it shortened my crack by about two inches.
 
2012-04-30 03:30:54 PM  

Yaxe: Never woken up during a surgery, but the recovery from anesthesia is always pretty quick. Though, I have to say, general anesthesia is hell on your gut. It's the reason they don't want you eating anything the day before - they don't want you vomiting on their nice shiny equipment, or worse, choking to death on your own vomit.

Also, for the sake of gross, look up a Pilonidal cyst. I had to have one removed and it shortened my crack by about two inches.


My kid had one removed last year. We call him "No-butt" now.
 
2012-04-30 03:33:23 PM  
Out of the four operations I've had I was only put under for two. The most recent was last Wednesday. I didn't wake up during surgery and everything went well until a day later when the tip of my uvula fell off. Has anyone else had considerable throat trouble after anesthesia? My surgery was nowhere near my throat. It's finally starting to feel better today after five days. I was gagging on my own uvula. Weird.
 
2012-04-30 03:35:24 PM  

ladyfortuna: I do vaguely remember when they cracked one of my impacted wisdom teeth during surgery and maybe the doctor's face/hands, but other than that nothing. I am SO glad general anesthesia kept me under for both my abdominal surgeries though, that would have panicked me.

I was freaking out just recently during a routine mole removal because I could feel the pressure/pulling/slicing on my skin (lower back so kind of a vulnerable feeling area). Had to think about kitties to keep from flipping out...

Also has anyone else had a lasting dizziness after GA? The first time, I got dizzy at random, for several weeks.


You should feel a c-section. All I kept saying the entire time was "This feels so weird!". I was also heavily medicated on morphine so there was no chance of a freak out.
 
2012-04-30 03:38:06 PM  
Thanks, subby.

I didn't need to sleep tonight anwyay.
 
2012-04-30 03:42:06 PM  
Diogenes: wisdom tooth extraction

Stabone33: wisdom tooth surgery

indylaw: wisdom tooth extraction

PlatinumDragon: wisdom tooth extraction

crzybtch: tooth extraction

RedPhoenix122: wisdom teeth pulled

Da fark? Your dentist tried to knock you out?

My Dentist only numbed the fark outta my mouth. No one even offered anything more than that. I had to hear every crack, grind, & saw. And I had the fun of watching a not quite 5 ft tall asian lady using all the strength god *didn't* give her to try to yank the damn things out. There were times she had one knee on the armrest and one on my forehead. She looked like she wrestled a bear and somehow won by the time she was done with all four.


Mine were pretty well impacted, so they weren't coming out without cutting, cracking, and prying. I actually went to an oral surgeon, not a dentist.
 
2012-04-30 03:45:23 PM  
No need to reinforce what fmk040 said (although I'm still cracking up at the swipe at the general surgery resident).

The vast majority of recall incidents (and virtually all mentioned above) are in cases done with sedation, not general anesthesia. The patients are either misled by staff into thinking they would be totally unconscious. That is not a goal of sedation - certainly not of conscious sedation. So waking up periodically and remembering events/sounds is typical of that type of sedation.

Recall during general anesthesia is a rare event, occuring mostly in trauma, open heart surgery, and OB. The issue in those procedures is that the patient or the unborn baby's life is acutely at risk at higher levels of anesthesia, so the level of anesthesia is decreased.

For the guy whose wife had the 3 hour C-section and felt the latter part of that, yeah, that sucks. But the procedure should take 30-45 minutes. The far larger issue is why the OB took 3 hours to do a C-section. Spinals are one-shot deals of limited duration. And the duration isn't 3 hours.

For the redhead - it is interesting, and proven to be true that redheads are not cheap dates in the OR. So what. Not a big deal. We just give more. No need to worry. If you pointed it out that you are a redhead before surgery, you would probably get a good chuckle from your anesthesiologist.

For patients who truly have recall during general anesthesia, it's a rotten experience. I don't want to minimize that. Fortunately, it's VERY rare.

/Cardiac-Trauma-OB Anesthesiologist.
 
2012-04-30 03:51:12 PM  
My lung collapsed about ten years back; the "surgery" consisted of making an incision between my ribs and poking a hole into the chest cavity with a finger. I "had to" be full on awake for this. It sucked but oxygen turns out to be an awesome thing.
 
2012-04-30 04:00:03 PM  

penthesilea: Diogenes: wisdom tooth extraction

Stabone33: wisdom tooth surgery

indylaw: wisdom tooth extraction

PlatinumDragon: wisdom tooth extraction

crzybtch: tooth extraction

RedPhoenix122: wisdom teeth pulled

Da fark? Your dentist tried to knock you out?

My Dentist only numbed the fark outta my mouth. No one even offered anything more than that. I had to hear every crack, grind, & saw. And I had the fun of watching a not quite 5 ft tall asian lady using all the strength god *didn't* give her to try to yank the damn things out. There were times she had one knee on the armrest and one on my forehead. She looked like she wrestled a bear and somehow won by the time she was done with all four.


Yeah. I had all four wisdom teeth removed when I was in the military. Three of them had not erupted and had to be surgically removed. They did it in two sessions lasting about 2.5 hours each. The anesthetic? Carbocaine injections into the joint of the jaw to affect a nerve block. It hurt like a biatch. It was a terrible experience. I was told that tough airmen didn't need any pussy anesthesia. You can bet that I refused all other dental care from the USAF.
 
2012-04-30 04:02:55 PM  
I woke up during surgery - NOT pleasant! Apparently weren't currently cutting into my leg, but immediately felt the ice cold tubes in nose and throat, and the pressure in same. Inability to swallow or move. Was able to use eyes perfectly well, and within a couple seconds of snapping them open and looking around, the doc/tech/whoever over me, looked down and saw me with eyes wide open, looking up at him and he motioned over my head in a up,up,up motion and I was back out in about 10-15 seconds.
It was about 35-45 seconds of hell.. and, although I very rarely dream (or can't remember them if I do) I have had nightmares about it or worse, happening again.

When I went in for another surgery I could not avoid, I flat out told them I wake up in the middle.. need to keep an eye on me.. do NOT want to go through that shiat again!!! Could tell guy was paying about as much attention to me as he was the rice prices in China... So, when went in, I fought the anesthesia. Told me I was going under.. and I didn't. "You still awake?" Yep! "Count backwards from 10.." And.. I did Now what do you want me to do, doc? And EVERYONE stopped and looked at me! Then they apparently knew I wasn't BS'n. Doctor told the guy to boost it some and then I felt really weird.. vision was going.. and finally told him I guess I'd see him after whi.....
At least I didn't wake up in the middle of the thing that time!
 
2012-04-30 04:07:22 PM  
yeah, wisdom teeth seems to be the most common to wake up during. Sort of woke during mine, I recall seeing the light through the inside of my eyelids but was apparently quickly knocked back out.
 
2012-04-30 04:20:02 PM  
I make Propofol for a living so I'm really getting a kick...
 
2012-04-30 04:22:36 PM  
Anyone ever see "Jacob's Ladder," with Tim Robbins? Lived something like that.
I woke up during a heart biopsy. It wasn't open heart, mind you, just a probe that's sent up the femoral artery, takes chunks out of your heart.
Anyhow, my heart was shiat, this was a day before my transplant. I woke up after being shocked, doctor asks me if I was okay, all I could say was "I saw monsters."
Scared the ever-living fark outta me, even 17 years later.
 
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