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(Neil Gaiman)   Neil Gaiman talks to Stephen King about why he wrote a sequel to The Shining, whether he'll rewrite The Dark Tower to remove himself, and other authory stuff   (journal.neilgaiman.com) divider line 94
    More: Spiffy, Joe King, Jack Torrance, Julie Andrews, American Gods, Dickensian, McMansions, John Gotti, Nancy Sinatra  
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5306 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 29 Apr 2012 at 7:46 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-04-29 07:53:26 PM  
Bangor? I just met her!
 
2012-04-29 07:54:46 PM  
maybe it's because i mistakenly thought Wind Through the Keyhole would detail the battle of Jericho Hill, but I was pretty disappointed with the book. It's barely even a Dark Tower novel as it's Roland telling a story about the time he told the title story when he was younger. It adds nothing to the series at all.


I would be interested in a re-edit of the last few books as they're a bit of a mess and were much more meta than I believe was the original intention, though I'm not too keen on the whole idea.
 
2012-04-29 07:57:01 PM  
My favorite King works were always his collection of short horror stories. But I haven't read his stuff in years.

/Ladyfingers. They taste just like ladyfingers.
 
2012-04-29 08:00:55 PM  
Holy shiat - there is a sequel to the Shining? I haven't read a King book in a decade...this may change very soon.

mimg.ugo.com
 
2012-04-29 08:01:02 PM  
Am I honestly the nly one that WASN'T completely horrified by the ending of The Dark Tower? I mean, yes the end battles were mildly anticlimatic, but it made sense. Flag thought he was untouchable until he found someone stronger that could put him down like a biatch. Happens to most bullies eventually, even mythical ones. And the Crimson King ending up a raving loon makes sense. Using a standard #2 to take him out was a bit annohing, though.
 
2012-04-29 08:07:07 PM  

born_yesterday: My favorite King works were always his collection of short horror stories. But I haven't read his stuff in years.

/Ladyfingers. They taste just like ladyfingers.


Hell's yeah, Robinson Crusoe was a pussy.
 
2012-04-29 08:09:08 PM  

Shadowknight: Am I honestly the nly one that WASN'T completely horrified by the ending of The Dark Tower? I mean, yes the end battles were mildly anticlimatic, but it made sense. Flag thought he was untouchable until he found someone stronger that could put him down like a biatch. Happens to most bullies eventually, even mythical ones. And the Crimson King ending up a raving loon makes sense. Using a standard #2 to take him out was a bit annohing, though.


I didn't like it too much initially, but it works better upon rereading it. That said, the Horn of Eld was barely mentioned until book V (the re-edit of The Gunslinger rectifies this) and the fact that it felt like the series became much more meta than it was originally intended just kind of made a controversial ending a bit hard to swallow. I also think the idea of King (the character in the book) controlling Roland's destiny doesn't entirely jibe with the semi-looped ending.
 
2012-04-29 08:18:02 PM  
Gaiman needs to get off his arse and write the promised sequel to American Gods.
 
2012-04-29 08:19:38 PM  

Shadowknight: Am I honestly the nly one that WASN'T completely horrified by the ending of The Dark Tower? I mean, yes the end battles were mildly anticlimatic, but it made sense. Flag thought he was untouchable until he found someone stronger that could put him down like a biatch. Happens to most bullies eventually, even mythical ones. And the Crimson King ending up a raving loon makes sense. Using a standard #2 to take him out was a bit annohing, though.


Nah, I loved the ending. It gets a little old defending SK's ending in every Dark Tower thread, so I stopped doing it.

Yes, his inclusion of himself in the books was a bit jarring at first but it works in the long run, and yeah, by that point the jackass in the van was beaten to death, but all of the books were good and I love them dearly.
 
2012-04-29 08:21:33 PM  
I didn't mind the ending of The Dark Tower. I'm prolly alone in that though.

I will say that I thought 11/22/63 was excellent
 
2012-04-29 08:22:04 PM  

FeedTheCollapse: Shadowknight: Am I honestly the nly one that WASN'T completely horrified by the ending of The Dark Tower? I mean, yes the end battles were mildly anticlimatic, but it made sense. Flag thought he was untouchable until he found someone stronger that could put him down like a biatch. Happens to most bullies eventually, even mythical ones. And the Crimson King ending up a raving loon makes sense. Using a standard #2 to take him out was a bit annohing, though.

I didn't like it too much initially, but it works better upon rereading it. That said, the Horn of Eld was barely mentioned until book V (the re-edit of The Gunslinger rectifies this) and the fact that it felt like the series became much more meta than it was originally intended just kind of made a controversial ending a bit hard to swallow. I also think the idea of King (the character in the book) controlling Roland's destiny doesn't entirely jibe with the semi-looped ending.


King didn't control Rand's Destiny, he was just the, erm... wellspring of Gan's word? So not the puppetmaster, just the source that the worlds pulled their reality from. I think. Been awhile since I read the series all the way through and I haven't gotten any of the updated books yet.
 
2012-04-29 08:26:06 PM  
how about Roland's creeping debilitating arthritis being cured by falling out of a truck?

Roland's arthritic hip was kind of like it's own villain and Rolland was having to rely more and more on his companions and then it was like King just got bored with that particular schtick and got rid of it. Those last books were awful.
 
2012-04-29 08:27:25 PM  
Now that it will soon be here, I hope Dr. Sleep won't suck. I'm not familiar King's newer works/writing style, is it on par with Cujo, Pet Semetery, or The Shining for that matter?
 
2012-04-29 08:30:08 PM  

nocturn: FeedTheCollapse: Shadowknight: Am I honestly the nly one that WASN'T completely horrified by the ending of The Dark Tower? I mean, yes the end battles were mildly anticlimatic, but it made sense. Flag thought he was untouchable until he found someone stronger that could put him down like a biatch. Happens to most bullies eventually, even mythical ones. And the Crimson King ending up a raving loon makes sense. Using a standard #2 to take him out was a bit annohing, though.

I didn't like it too much initially, but it works better upon rereading it. That said, the Horn of Eld was barely mentioned until book V (the re-edit of The Gunslinger rectifies this) and the fact that it felt like the series became much more meta than it was originally intended just kind of made a controversial ending a bit hard to swallow. I also think the idea of King (the character in the book) controlling Roland's destiny doesn't entirely jibe with the semi-looped ending.

King didn't control Rand's Destiny, he was just the, erm... wellspring of Gan's word? So not the puppetmaster, just the source that the worlds pulled their reality from. I think. Been awhile since I read the series all the way through and I haven't gotten any of the updated books yet.




eh, I guess you're a bit closer than I was, but it still doesn't entirely work. It felt like King's therapy and it turned the series in a way I don't think it was meant to go. I thought the last book was pretty good, though Mordred was mostly pointless. Books V and VI could've used some heavy editing, though. I don't mind Callahan's appearance, but I thought it was more interesting when the characters from King's other books just wandered in without any backstory related to their parent books.
 
2012-04-29 08:39:30 PM  

rtaylor92: how about Roland's creeping debilitating arthritis being cured by falling out of a truck?

Roland's arthritic hip was kind of like it's own villain and Rolland was having to rely more and more on his companions and then it was like King just got bored with that particular schtick and got rid of it. Those last books were awful.


Here's what I think happened: Post accident, Stephen King got so concerned about dying before completing it, he rushed through to get the series done. Maybe this should be considered the rough draft of the work and a heavy re-edit on all post-accident books be done, followed by a proper re-release.
 
2012-04-29 08:43:19 PM  

rtaylor92: how about Roland's creeping debilitating arthritis being cured by falling out of a truck?

Roland's arthritic hip was kind of like it's own villain and Rolland was having to rely more and more on his companions and then it was like King just got bored with that particular schtick and got rid of it. Those last books were awful.


It wasn't arthritis, Roland's "arthritic" pain was the impending reality of Stephen King's similar injuries when he got hit by the van. Once Roland stopped any possibility of King getting run over, the pain went away.
 
2012-04-29 08:48:22 PM  
Reading wind thru the keyhole now heh
 
2012-04-29 08:55:23 PM  

Shadowknight: Am I honestly the nly one that WASN'T completely horrified by the ending of The Dark Tower? I mean, yes the end battles were mildly anticlimatic, but it made sense. Flag thought he was untouchable until he found someone stronger that could put him down like a biatch. Happens to most bullies eventually, even mythical ones. And the Crimson King ending up a raving loon makes sense. Using a standard #2 to take him out was a bit annohing, though.


While I didn't find the ending horrifying, I did find the ending disappointing. The last three books were barely meh-worthy IMO, and I haven't bothered to reread them. I've read the first three about a dozen times each, and the 4th book about half that many. (though mostly because by the time the 4th came out, I was in university and making the attempt to have a social life so I didn't have as much time to read as I did when I was younger)

The absolute ending of the series, paradoxically enough, I thought was pretty good. Or at least it was the best way I could see to end the series, though it took me a bit of time and contemplation before I came to that conclusion.
 
2012-04-29 08:58:13 PM  

BroVinny: Gaiman needs to get off his arse and write the promised sequel to American Gods.


It's called Canadian Gods and it's basically just a rehash of Strange Brew. Except the final battle is between the God of Poutine and God of Tim Hortons.

/at least nobody gets eaten by a va-jay-jay in this one
 
2012-04-29 09:02:35 PM  

BroVinny: Gaiman needs to get off his arse and write the promised sequel to American Gods.


Wasn't that Anansi Boys?
 
2012-04-29 09:03:21 PM  

BroVinny: Gaiman needs to get off his arse and write the promised sequel to American Gods.


Say it to his face, nancy boy.

/blinks
 
2012-04-29 09:04:41 PM  

Ed Willy: rtaylor92: how about Roland's creeping debilitating arthritis being cured by falling out of a truck?

Roland's arthritic hip was kind of like it's own villain and Rolland was having to rely more and more on his companions and then it was like King just got bored with that particular schtick and got rid of it. Those last books were awful.

Here's what I think happened: Post accident, Stephen King got so concerned about dying before completing it, he rushed through to get the series done. Maybe this should be considered the rough draft of the work and a heavy re-edit on all post-accident books be done, followed by a proper re-release.


I think this might be the only reason why I would welcome a re-edit/writing of the last 3 books. The idea comes off as George Lucas-y revisionism, but I can't see a re-writing being worse for the Dark Tower.
 
2012-04-29 09:06:36 PM  

Shadowknight: Am I honestly the nly one that WASN'T completely horrified by the ending of The Dark Tower?


No. I like the VERY last part of the ending.

But from the instant Stephen King is a character it gets stupid.

Also, having the last battle being fought with who was there was kind of lame considering the previous books, but oh well.
 
2012-04-29 09:09:20 PM  

Knight of the Woeful Countenance: I didn't mind the ending of The Dark Tower. I'm prolly alone in that though.

I will say that I thought 11/22/63 was excellent


I didn't care for the content of the last three books, I mean doing Magnificent Seven but with Doctor Doom robots armed with Harry Potter weapons was bad enough, then King inserted himself into the books, had Roland pull a Dues Ex Machina dude out of a doorway and then have Roland cry out King's name even. Even then I was fine with the way it ended, it was what I expected.

11/22/63 was good, wrapped up a little too neatly, but I liked it. Between that and Full Dark, No Stars, I feel more confident in this sequel.
 
2012-04-29 09:20:24 PM  
I am an unreserved fan of the ending of the Dark Tower. This series has shaped my thinking in many ways. I am wearing a turtle necklace, and the wife and I say "Bird and bear and hare and fish" to each other in times of need.

I am just getting to Roland's telling of the story in the new book, and I cannot properly explain how nice and comforting it is to see these characters again. It just makes me feel good.

Thank you Sai King!
 
2012-04-29 09:23:45 PM  
I thought Kubrick's movie was better than the novel.

/just sayin'
 
2012-04-29 09:25:09 PM  

dohrk: I am an unreserved fan of the ending of the Dark Tower. This series has shaped my thinking in many ways. I am wearing a turtle necklace, and the wife and I say "Bird and bear and hare and fish" to each other in times of need.

I am just getting to Roland's telling of the story in the new book, and I cannot properly explain how nice and comforting it is to see these characters again. It just makes me feel good.

Thank you Sai King!


nice try, Mr. King.
 
2012-04-29 09:25:48 PM  

FeedTheCollapse: maybe it's because i mistakenly thought Wind Through the Keyhole would detail the battle of Jericho Hill, but I was pretty disappointed with the book. It's barely even a Dark Tower novel as it's Roland telling a story about the time he told the title story when he was younger. It adds nothing to the series at all.


I liked it well enough. It had an "Eyes of the Dragon" kind of feel to it, but in a Dark Tower series wrapper. And since the tale with the tale that he told was about a gunslinger, it was fitting. I think it adds a nice bit of cultural backdrop to the series, but even if it doesn't, I really enjoyed the tale.

Yes, I too would really like to read about the Battle of Jericho Hill and the fall of Gilead. I think. On the one hand, it would be great to have the details, but on the other hand, as it stands now, we get to imagine what we think happened from the hints passed onto us by the existing books. And that's kind of fun, too.
 
2012-04-29 09:27:20 PM  

mamoru: the tale within the tale


ftfm
 
2012-04-29 09:29:00 PM  

LeroyBourne: Now that it will soon be here, I hope Dr. Sleep won't suck. I'm not familiar King's newer works/writing style, is it on par with Cujo, Pet Semetery, or The Shining for that matter?


I've read most all his stuff and around the time of his accident back around '99 (Dreamcatcher, last few Dark Tower books) he dropped pretty noticeably in quality. But it's my opinion in the last few years he's rebounded quite a lot. I'm not sure he'll ever capture some of the brilliance of his early stuff again, but he's still putting out pretty solid stuff. Full Dark, No Stars felt a lot like vintage King. Haven't read 11/22/63 yet but it's on my queue. Under the Dome didn't really need to be 1000 pages long, but it was the fastest damn 1000 pages I've ever read (and of course it all falls apart at the end but still).

And even Dreamcatcher is worthy of notice, because the movie adaptation is so god-awful that it has to be seen to be believed. Yet it's a very faithful adaptation at that.
 
2012-04-29 09:29:19 PM  

mamoru: I liked it well enough. It had an "Eyes of the Dragon" kind of feel to it, but in a Dark Tower series wrapper. And since the tale with the tale that he told was about a gunslinger, it was fitting. I think it adds a nice bit of cultural backdrop to the series, but even if it doesn't, I really enjoyed the tale.


I liked the main story just fine, but the "Roland tells a story about him telling a story" just felt like an awkward way to present the story. I guess I was just hoping another layer would be added to the series, but it's just an awkward side-story that kind of feels like the Dark Tower references were done after the fact.


I didn't know the fall of Gilead was covered in the Marvel comics (I knew of them, but never looked into them), but that seemed like a side-story that would've added more to the series.
 
2012-04-29 09:34:27 PM  

Confabulat: And even Dreamcatcher is worthy of notice, because the movie adaptation is so god-awful that it has to be seen to be believed. Yet it's a very faithful adaptation at that.




ha, Dreamcatcher was a pretty awful book, but the movie adaptation is a must-see for fans of crappy movies. The fact that it was so literal of an adaptation makes it even more of an oddity.
 
2012-04-29 09:36:59 PM  

FeedTheCollapse: I liked the main story just fine, but the "Roland tells a story about him telling a story" just felt like an awkward way to present the story. I guess I was just hoping another layer would be added to the series, but it's just an awkward side-story that kind of feels like the Dark Tower references were done after the fact.


I haven't read this one yet either, but I read someone describe it as "three novellas disguised as one story." I think if I know that going in I might like it better. It's like how a generation of King fans screamed when the long-awaited Book 4 arrived and a couple hundred pages in, everyone realized this wasn't going to advance the tale at all, but if you read it knowing that, it's one of the better ones in the series.
 
2012-04-29 09:39:01 PM  

FeedTheCollapse: Confabulat: And even Dreamcatcher is worthy of notice, because the movie adaptation is so god-awful that it has to be seen to be believed. Yet it's a very faithful adaptation at that.



ha, Dreamcatcher was a pretty awful book, but the movie adaptation is a must-see for fans of crappy movies. The fact that it was so literal of an adaptation makes it even more of an oddity.


I watched Dreamcatcher all alone at a matinee and kept thinking, wow this is terrible, I really should leave and go do something. But just when you think it couldn't get any worse, they make it even more insanely terrible and you're just staring in disbelief at the screen. And Morgan Freeman's eyebrows. That movie has some of the greatest terrible scenes in movie history and they just keep coming. Three words: Retard Donnie Wahlberg.
 
2012-04-29 09:45:17 PM  

FeedTheCollapse: I liked the main story just fine, but the "Roland tells a story about him telling a story" just felt like an awkward way to present the story. I guess I was just hoping another layer would be added to the series, but it's just an awkward side-story that kind of feels like the Dark Tower references were done after the fact.


Fair enough, and I agree that it was a bit awkward. It did have the feel that the wrapper story was made up solely for a way to present the main story, and so it didn't feel as authentic.

Back to TFA, I'm very interested in the thought that he might be revising the final novels of the Dark Tower series. I like the series in its current forms (yes, plural; see below), and I didn't mind so much about him putting himself in them. The the current revised Dark Tower series it works well enough, though it doesn't work for the original series, IMHO.

I've posted the same thing before in other Dark Tower threads, but I'll post it again here. I think of the Dark Tower series as having two separate incarnations:

1.) The original Dark Tower Series - This includes the original versions of the Gunslinger, the Drawing of Three, and the Wastelands. The biggest differences in this are the conversation with Walter at the end of the Gunslinger, the actual identities of Walter, Marten, and Flagg (who is actually mentioned by name in The Drawing of Three), and the idea that after Walter, Roland's obstacles to the tower would be The Ageless Stranger (presumably Flagg) and The Beast. And several other things as well. It starts with "The Man in Black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed", but this series was never finished. :(

2.) The current revised Dark Tower Series - this is all seven (well, 8, now) books, but the first three are the revised editions. It starts with "The Man in Black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed", and it ends with the final line of Browning's "Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came". It has all of the stuff about the Crimson King, who, if I may say so, really lost all of his menace. The powerful character (who might have made a good one to be The Beast) alluded to in so many other books became a cackling madman with a box of exploding sneetches. That was disappointing.

I like them both well quite a lot. I like #2 plenty, but I have to think of it as a separate thing from #1 or the inconsistencies end up driving me crazy (Walter is NOT Marten is NOT Flagg; Farson is a place, NOT a person; etc). I would have like to have seen what kind of story #1 would have become, but we were left with our friends starting the Riddling Contest on Blaine the Mono. I could almost go with Wizard and Glass as being part of the original series, except how it ended with Flagg and Marten being one in the same, and other bits of confusion about identities.

IMNSHO. ;)

Anyway, it will be interesting to see if and what King revises. I'd love to see the story revised more back towards its original ideas and roots.
 
2012-04-29 09:46:39 PM  

Confabulat: FeedTheCollapse: I liked the main story just fine, but the "Roland tells a story about him telling a story" just felt like an awkward way to present the story. I guess I was just hoping another layer would be added to the series, but it's just an awkward side-story that kind of feels like the Dark Tower references were done after the fact.

I haven't read this one yet either, but I read someone describe it as "three novellas disguised as one story." I think if I know that going in I might like it better. It's like how a generation of King fans screamed when the long-awaited Book 4 arrived and a couple hundred pages in, everyone realized this wasn't going to advance the tale at all, but if you read it knowing that, it's one of the better ones in the series.




eh, even that is being rather misleading. The bulk of the book is The Wind Through the Keyhole myth, which is told by a young Roland immediately following the events in Mejis and him killing his mother. This flashback scene is otherwise fairly brief and would've been more interesting as a longer story, otherwise the plot is basically just there for older Roland to tell the tale during the downtime between books IV and V, otherwise nothing really goes on on this level outside of them weathering a storm. It also doesn't help that the main story doesn't really tie into Younger Roland's plot.

Essentially, it's a story within a story within a story. It's just awkward.


I thought book 4 moved the plot forward even if it was mostly flashbacks.
 
2012-04-29 09:54:48 PM  

Confabulat: FeedTheCollapse: Confabulat: And even Dreamcatcher is worthy of notice, because the movie adaptation is so god-awful that it has to be seen to be believed. Yet it's a very faithful adaptation at that.



ha, Dreamcatcher was a pretty awful book, but the movie adaptation is a must-see for fans of crappy movies. The fact that it was so literal of an adaptation makes it even more of an oddity.

I watched Dreamcatcher all alone at a matinee and kept thinking, wow this is terrible, I really should leave and go do something. But just when you think it couldn't get any worse, they make it even more insanely terrible and you're just staring in disbelief at the screen. And Morgan Freeman's eyebrows. That movie has some of the greatest terrible scenes in movie history and they just keep coming. Three words: Retard Donnie Wahlberg.




ha, me too. I didn't even enjoy the book, yet I kept laughing at the movie even though it was complete crap.
 
2012-04-29 09:55:28 PM  
I would like a book of short stories like Little Sisters of Eluria...

I both enjoyed and loathed the comics
 
2012-04-29 09:56:08 PM  

Confabulat: LeroyBourne: Now that it will soon be here, I hope Dr. Sleep won't suck. I'm not familiar King's newer works/writing style, is it on par with Cujo, Pet Semetery, or The Shining for that matter?

I've read most all his stuff and around the time of his accident back around '99 (Dreamcatcher, last few Dark Tower books) he dropped pretty noticeably in quality. But it's my opinion in the last few years he's rebounded quite a lot. I'm not sure he'll ever capture some of the brilliance of his early stuff again, but he's still putting out pretty solid stuff. Full Dark, No Stars felt a lot like vintage King. Haven't read 11/22/63 yet but it's on my queue. Under the Dome didn't really need to be 1000 pages long, but it was the fastest damn 1000 pages I've ever read (and of course it all falls apart at the end but still).

And even Dreamcatcher is worthy of notice, because the movie adaptation is so god-awful that it has to be seen to be believed. Yet it's a very faithful adaptation at that.


Thank you sir. I really hope he, as you put it, 'captures some of the brilliance.' The Shining was the first story I read that really scared the hell out of me, and I read it long after seeing the movie.
 
2012-04-29 10:02:00 PM  

Fano: I would like a book of short stories like Little Sisters of Eluria...

I both enjoyed and loathed the comics


I read the comics a while back. I mostly liked the stories themselves, but I just wasn't a big fan of the style of artwork used.

Shadowknight: Am I honestly the nly one that WASN'T completely horrified by the ending of The Dark Tower?


No, I liked the end as well. To me it makes perfect sense and is very much a King type ending. I wasn't a huge fan of the showdown with the Crimson King, but oh well. Personally I wasn't too bothered by him inserting himself into the story. The pacing of Song of Susannah on the other hand...
 
2012-04-29 10:02:57 PM  

NYIslander: BroVinny: Gaiman needs to get off his arse and write the promised sequel to American Gods.

Wasn't that Anansi Boys?


Anansi Boys was more of a spin-off than a direct sequel. The sequel is going to pick up with Shadow and it's rumored to deal more with the New Gods.
 
2012-04-29 10:07:45 PM  
When King mentioned writing about an amusement park serial killer book called "Joyland" I immediately thought about the amusement park serial killer named "Funland" in Gaiman's "Sandman". How could he not follow up with a question about that?
 
2012-04-29 10:23:57 PM  
i291.photobucket.com
 
2012-04-29 10:25:41 PM  

fustanella: BroVinny: Gaiman needs to get off his arse and write the promised sequel to American Gods.

Say it to his face, nancy boy.

/blinks


If he said it to his face, he probably agree, but then his wife would stand up for him and kick the guy's ass for saying that to his face. You do not fark with Amanda farking Palmer.
 
2012-04-29 10:27:01 PM  

Confabulat: I haven't read this one yet either, but I read someone describe it as "three novellas disguised as one story." I think if I know that going in I might like it better.


That's how it became a novel. He wrote three stories and wound up sticking them together, sandwich style instead of publishing 3 short stories.
 
2012-04-29 10:36:25 PM  

demonfaerie: fustanella: BroVinny: Gaiman needs to get off his arse and write the promised sequel to American Gods.

Say it to his face, nancy boy.

/blinks

If he said it to his face, he probably agree, but then his wife would stand up for him and kick the guy's ass for saying that to his face. You do not fark with Amanda farking Palmer.


Honestly, I thought no man farked Amanda Palmer until she married Neil Gaiman.

I was wrong.
 
2012-04-29 10:37:04 PM  
"but then", not "until"

Dammit.
 
2012-04-29 10:42:49 PM  

doglover: That's how it became a novel. He wrote three stories and wound up sticking them together, sandwich style instead of publishing 3 short stories.


Well, to be fair, without the inner two layers of story, there isn't really enough in the outer-most layer, which is directly the events between "Wizard and Glass" and "Wolves of the Calla", to make an interesting story. It really is just a wrapper for the other two, and the middle layer, while not a bad story itself, is still just more wrapper for the inner layer.

I have a feeling that he wrote the main story and was at a loss for what to do with it. It wasn't enough of a story to be published on its own, or at least doing so wouldn't work well like it did for Eyes of the Dragon, because it is an actual fairy tale from the Dark Tower universe. Also, I think he rightly felt that just having Roland tell the fairy tale to his companions with no other background wouldn't work so well, so King decided to integrate it into another tale of Roland's youth that would fit with what he would tell his companions.

While it's not perfect, overall I think Stephen King did a good job with it. But, perhaps I'm biased, because I really liked the fairy tale at the center of it all.
 
2012-04-30 01:22:44 AM  
I haven't read this newest Dark Tower book, but I will.

I love the series as it stands, even the looping ending. Well, with the caveat that I have not read the revised versions. I have the first five in their old tradeback form, and haven't seen the need to read any other editions. Still need the tradebacks for the last two.
 
2012-04-30 01:30:32 AM  
You know, for all of everyone saying Dreamcatcher was a faithful adaptation, I don't remember Duddits being an alien in the book. I could have sworn he was just a psychic retard.
 
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