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(Telegraph)   Astronomers find first planet in the sweet spot of the habitable zone, capable of supporting intelligent life   (telegraph.co.uk) divider line 123
    More: Misc, planets, habitable zones, red dwarf stars, radial velocity, astronomers, extrasolar planets, planetary habitability, light-years  
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6968 clicks; posted to Geek » on 27 Apr 2012 at 12:58 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-04-27 11:25:29 AM
Myth.
 
2012-04-27 11:34:42 AM
Shouldn't that be the second?
 
2012-04-27 11:37:05 AM

deffuse: Shouldn't that be the second?


LOL. Good one.
 
2012-04-27 11:51:02 AM
I'd settle for capable of supporting complex life.
 
2012-04-27 11:54:03 AM
for all we know, that planet blew up 10 years ago.
 
2012-04-27 11:57:16 AM
Around a red dwarf? Yeah, it's tidally locked. Maybe life in a little ribbon between daytime and nighttime.
 
2012-04-27 11:57:25 AM

ManateeGag: for all we know, that planet blew up 10 years ago.


Fark you, Tarkin!
 
2012-04-27 12:06:37 PM
Capable of supporting Earth-like life, perhaps. I'm tired of the assumption that any form of life that occurs in the universe will look anything like what it does here.
 
2012-04-27 12:12:31 PM

Cagey B: Capable of supporting Earth-like life, perhaps. I'm tired of the assumption that any form of life that occurs in the universe will look anything like what it does here.


Perhaps since it will be the easiest to identify as life, then it would be the type of life we should be looking for.

Plus, if we can confirm there's another kind of life almost identical to our own, the likelihood of which is so small, then we can almost guarantee there MUST be other kinds of life out there.
 
2012-04-27 12:13:33 PM
Only 22 light years away... I'll load up the car.
 
2012-04-27 12:16:32 PM

GAT_00: Around a red dwarf? Yeah, it's tidally locked.


I'm no astrophysicist, so I need to ask... from what does 'in orbit around a red dwarf' necessarily imply 'tidally locked'?
 
2012-04-27 12:16:51 PM
FTA:
Astronomers have discovered their "holy grail" - a planet capable of supporting life outside our solar system.

www.squidmobile.com

Oh, naughty, naughty Zoot!
 
2012-04-27 12:21:46 PM

deffuse: Shouldn't that be the second?


Have you seen the Politics tab?
 
2012-04-27 12:25:15 PM
FTA: Red dwarf stars are the most common stars in the neighbourhood of the sun

i105.photobucket.com

What Red Dwarf stars might look like.
 
2012-04-27 12:26:04 PM

Cagey B: Capable of supporting Earth-like life, perhaps. I'm tired of the assumption that any form of life that occurs in the universe will look anything like what it does here.


Me too. What if there's some alien scientists in another galaxy checking out our system saying "Hey everyone, that 7th planet from the system's sun is in a habitable zone!"
 
2012-04-27 12:26:38 PM

gameshowhost: GAT_00: Around a red dwarf? Yeah, it's tidally locked.

I'm no astrophysicist, so I need to ask... from what does 'in orbit around a red dwarf' necessarily imply 'tidally locked'?


I'm guessing here, but maybe because the habitable zone around a red dwarf is so close to the star that any rocky planet would necessarily be so deep in the gravity well that it would have to be tidally locked.
 
2012-04-27 12:32:44 PM

deffuse: Shouldn't that be the second?


so you really didnt get the headline
lol
 
2012-04-27 12:50:05 PM

Cagey B: Capable of supporting Earth-like life, perhaps. I'm tired of the assumption that any form of life that occurs in the universe will look anything like what it does here.


well, earth does have a lot of weird looking stuff.
 
2012-04-27 01:00:51 PM

FloydA: FTA: Red dwarf stars are the most common stars in the neighbourhood of the sun


Quagaars discovered?
 
2012-04-27 01:02:16 PM

Jubeebee: gameshowhost: GAT_00: Around a red dwarf? Yeah, it's tidally locked.

I'm no astrophysicist, so I need to ask... from what does 'in orbit around a red dwarf' necessarily imply 'tidally locked'?

I'm guessing here, but maybe because the habitable zone around a red dwarf is so close to the star that any rocky planet would necessarily be so deep in the gravity well that it would have to be tidally locked.


Ya, some Googling confirms that such w/ liquid water are highly likely to be tidally locked... not 'necessarily implies' but close enough. IT'S LEGIT TO ME
 
2012-04-27 01:03:19 PM
I've been praying that there's intelligent life somewhere up in space.
 
2012-04-27 01:08:55 PM

4.5 times earth mass?
Bring in the Hoffmanites.

www.thugdome.com
 
2012-04-27 01:09:31 PM
Awright, I'm packing Finland up in my bag and we are MOVING.
 
2012-04-27 01:11:12 PM
FTA: as 20 years ago scientists were still arguing about the existence of planets beyond our solar system.

Really? I'm having a hard time believing that any credible scientist 20 years ago thought that other suns wouldn't have bodies of rock or gas orbiting them.
 
2012-04-27 01:13:12 PM

I_Am_Weasel: I've been praying that there's intelligent life somewhere up in space.


subspecies.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-04-27 01:16:20 PM
Sweet! Another planet to rape.
 
2012-04-27 01:16:37 PM

I_Am_Weasel: I've been praying that there's intelligent life somewhere up in space.


Cuz there's bugger all down here on Earth.
 
2012-04-27 01:18:55 PM
3 more questions need to be answered now.

1a) Does it have a magnetic field?
1b) How fast is it rotating?


2a) What is the atmosphere composed of?
2b) What kind of pressure are we looking at on the surface?

3) Is water available?

/science is fun
 
2012-04-27 01:19:19 PM
From personnel experience I find that the better you are at finding the sweet spot the more likely you are to get into the hitable zone.

/jet lagged and on sinus meds sorry
 
2012-04-27 01:19:20 PM
Yeah, it's all fine and dandy until you realize this is the native life on that planet.
 
2012-04-27 01:30:13 PM
Class M?
 
2012-04-27 01:41:35 PM

Cheron: From personnel experience I find that the better you are at finding the sweet spot the more likely you are to get into the hitable zone.


If you work in HR, you should really stay away from that kind of stuff...
 
2012-04-27 01:44:00 PM
many of you are way way smarter than me, but if a bunch of these meteorites are flying around there is a chance that there is life somewhere in the universe, or the chance that life could start somewhere if one these land on the right planet.

Am I right in thinking this?

/love thinking about this stuff
 
2012-04-27 01:45:40 PM

Cagey B: Capable of supporting Earth-like life, perhaps. I'm tired of the assumption that any form of life that occurs in the universe will look anything like what it does here.


It's easy to day there could be alternative biochemistry involved, but when you start looking into the details of how those biochemistries would function you start running into problems where the chemical bonds formed by silicon are too strong for it to make a good alternative to carbon, and ammonia makes a crappy substitute for water due to weak hydrogen bonds and a low surface tension. Plus you have the fact that hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon are among the most common elements in the universe, so it isn't an accident that they are used for biological processes.

We'll see what happens when we look more closely at moons like Titan in the outer solar system where methane-based life might work, but it's possible that the basic chemistry just doesn't work out on forms of life that are too far removed from our own. I'd love to see some really exotic life, but reading about some of the problems with alternative biochemistry gives me some cause to think it just isn't as easy getting life started with those building blocks.
 
2012-04-27 01:47:33 PM
I won't believe this until I hear confirmation from BadAstronomer
 
2012-04-27 01:48:22 PM

Jekylman: I_Am_Weasel: I've been praying that there's intelligent life somewhere up in space.


I'm guessing you haven't seen The Meaning of Life.
 
2012-04-27 01:51:26 PM

busy chillin': many of you are way way smarter than me, but if a bunch of these meteorites are flying around there is a chance that there is life somewhere in the universe, or the chance that life could start somewhere if one these land on the right planet.

Am I right in thinking this?

/love thinking about this stuff


better yet....the asteroid that hit the earth that kill off the T-rex put a lot of earth material (which had life in it) into space. That stuff could be landing on habitable planets right now seeding life.
 
2012-04-27 01:52:05 PM

gameshowhost: Jubeebee: gameshowhost: GAT_00: Around a red dwarf? Yeah, it's tidally locked.

I'm no astrophysicist, so I need to ask... from what does 'in orbit around a red dwarf' necessarily imply 'tidally locked'?

I'm guessing here, but maybe because the habitable zone around a red dwarf is so close to the star that any rocky planet would necessarily be so deep in the gravity well that it would have to be tidally locked.

Ya, some Googling confirms that such w/ liquid water are highly likely to be tidally locked... not 'necessarily implies' but close enough. IT'S LEGIT TO ME


Yeah, that's it. That takes time too, so if it's a young red dwarf, it still may be rotating. But basically when a planet is close to the sun it tends to rotate slower. There's a fair bit of math behind that, but for example, you know Venus and Mercury rotate exceptionally slowly, so their days are nearly as long, or longer in Mercury's case, than their year. That's an effect due to proximity to the sun. Red dwarfs are much cooler, so a habitable zone is very close to the sun. However, red dwarfs don't mass much less, so it's likely to be tidally locked.
 
2012-04-27 01:54:35 PM
All they need to do to be sure is to scan their spectrum for bacon.
 
2012-04-27 01:55:43 PM

Cheron: From personnel experience I find that the better you are at finding the sweet spot the more likely you are to get into the hitable zone.

/jet lagged and on sinus meds sorry


iseewhatyoudidthere.jpg
 
2012-04-27 02:00:22 PM

GAT_00: gameshowhost: Jubeebee: gameshowhost: GAT_00: Around a red dwarf? Yeah, it's tidally locked.

I'm no astrophysicist, so I need to ask... from what does 'in orbit around a red dwarf' necessarily imply 'tidally locked'?

I'm guessing here, but maybe because the habitable zone around a red dwarf is so close to the star that any rocky planet would necessarily be so deep in the gravity well that it would have to be tidally locked.

Ya, some Googling confirms that such w/ liquid water are highly likely to be tidally locked... not 'necessarily implies' but close enough. IT'S LEGIT TO ME

Yeah, that's it. That takes time too, so if it's a young red dwarf, it still may be rotating. But basically when a planet is close to the sun it tends to rotate slower. There's a fair bit of math behind that, but for example, you know Venus and Mercury rotate exceptionally slowly, so their days are nearly as long, or longer in Mercury's case, than their year. That's an effect due to proximity to the sun. Red dwarfs are much cooler, so a habitable zone is very close to the sun. However, red dwarfs don't mass much less, so it's likely to be tidally locked.


I dig.

RoyBatty: Class M?


GTFO, replicant. -_o
 
2012-04-27 02:05:09 PM
DOOLITTLE
Well... now what? What do, you have
for us now. Boiler?

BOILER
(checking his readouts)
Not much. Nothing at all in this
sector.

DOOLITTLE
Find me something, I don't care
where it is.

BOILER
Well, I show a 95% probability of
sentient life in the Horsehead
Nebula...

DOOLITTLE
fark that shiat.

BOILER
Well, it is kind of a long shot...

DOOLITTLE
It's a goddamn wild goose chase.
Remember when Commander Powell found
that 99 plus probability of sentient
life in the Magellanic Cloud?

BOILER
Well, there's the possibility of...

DOOLITTLE
Remember what we found? Fourteen
light years for a farking mindless
vegetable that looked like a limp
balloon and went squawk and let a
fart when you touched it. Remember?

BOILER
All right, then...

DOOLITTLE
So don't give me any of that
sentient life crap. Find me
something I can blow up.
 
2012-04-27 02:10:43 PM

GAT_00: gameshowhost: Jubeebee: gameshowhost: GAT_00: Around a red dwarf? Yeah, it's tidally locked.

I'm no astrophysicist, so I need to ask... from what does 'in orbit around a red dwarf' necessarily imply 'tidally locked'?

I'm guessing here, but maybe because the habitable zone around a red dwarf is so close to the star that any rocky planet would necessarily be so deep in the gravity well that it would have to be tidally locked.

Ya, some Googling confirms that such w/ liquid water are highly likely to be tidally locked... not 'necessarily implies' but close enough. IT'S LEGIT TO ME

Yeah, that's it. That takes time too, so if it's a young red dwarf, it still may be rotating. But basically when a planet is close to the sun it tends to rotate slower. There's a fair bit of math behind that, but for example, you know Venus and Mercury rotate exceptionally slowly, so their days are nearly as long, or longer in Mercury's case, than their year. That's an effect due to proximity to the sun. Red dwarfs are much cooler, so a habitable zone is very close to the sun. However, red dwarfs don't mass much less, so it's likely to be tidally locked.


venus' day is longer than its year. think you have them transposed.
 
2012-04-27 02:11:41 PM

Diogenes: deffuse: Shouldn't that be the second?

LOL. Good one.


Well, subby did say intelligent life.
 
2012-04-27 02:13:53 PM

SpikeStrip: venus' day is longer than its year. think you have them transposed.


I may. I'm having trouble giving a fark today.
 
2012-04-27 02:15:48 PM
I think that, if we are to boost our space exploration programs worldwide, we're going to need a farking huge incentive. For example, migration would be one (see Firefly), another one would be either finding, or inventing, a space enemy that wants to blow us up (and who gets more money than defense?).
 
2012-04-27 02:19:09 PM

Mad_Radhu: Cagey B: Capable of supporting Earth-like life, perhaps. I'm tired of the assumption that any form of life that occurs in the universe will look anything like what it does here.

It's easy to day there could be alternative biochemistry involved, but when you start looking into the details of how those biochemistries would function you start running into problems where the chemical bonds formed by silicon are too strong for it to make a good alternative to carbon, and ammonia makes a crappy substitute for water due to weak hydrogen bonds and a low surface tension. Plus you have the fact that hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon are among the most common elements in the universe, so it isn't an accident that they are used for biological processes.

We'll see what happens when we look more closely at moons like Titan in the outer solar system where methane-based life might work, but it's possible that the basic chemistry just doesn't work out on forms of life that are too far removed from our own. I'd love to see some really exotic life, but reading about some of the problems with alternative biochemistry gives me some cause to think it just isn't as easy getting life started with those building blocks.


Additionaly given the same conditions on the planet(I.E. gravity, atmospheric pressure, carbon based life blah blah blah). I wouldn't think life from another planet would be all that much different in appearance than life on earth.
 
2012-04-27 02:21:09 PM

Mad_Radhu: We'll see what happens when we look more closely at moons like Titan in the outer solar system where methane-based life might work, but it's possible that the basic chemistry just doesn't work out on forms of life that are too far removed from our own. I'd love to see some really exotic life, but reading about some of the problems with alternative biochemistry gives me some cause to think it just isn't as easy getting life started with those building blocks.


Yes, but... I think that a lot of the confusion comes from people meaning different things when they say "similar to us". People like yourself mean having essentially the same basic chemistry, i..e carbon-based; and from that a good likelihood of sugars, proteins, and other basic building blocks; but not making any assumptions about anything more specific than that.

But for many people, what they mean by "similar to us" is expecting alien life to have essentially the same body plan that we are familiar with from mammals and reptiles here on Earth, i.e. like the population of a George Lucas-designed cantina. And when those people say that aliens won't be similar to us, they simply mean unlikely to resemble any animal we have seen, not that their body chemistry isn't funneled by same fundamental constraints as ours. Often, they may not be thinking about the chemistry at all.
 
2012-04-27 02:28:07 PM

I alone am best: Mad_Radhu: Cagey B: Capable of supporting Earth-like life, perhaps. I'm tired of the assumption that any form of life that occurs in the universe will look anything like what it does here.

It's easy to day there could be alternative biochemistry involved, but when you start looking into the details of how those biochemistries would function you start running into problems where the chemical bonds formed by silicon are too strong for it to make a good alternative to carbon, and ammonia makes a crappy substitute for water due to weak hydrogen bonds and a low surface tension. Plus you have the fact that hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon are among the most common elements in the universe, so it isn't an accident that they are used for biological processes.

We'll see what happens when we look more closely at moons like Titan in the outer solar system where methane-based life might work, but it's possible that the basic chemistry just doesn't work out on forms of life that are too far removed from our own. I'd love to see some really exotic life, but reading about some of the problems with alternative biochemistry gives me some cause to think it just isn't as easy getting life started with those building blocks.

Additionaly given the same conditions on the planet(I.E. gravity, atmospheric pressure, carbon based life blah blah blah). I wouldn't think life from another planet would be all that much different in appearance than life on earth.


arealiensreal.org
 
2012-04-27 02:30:14 PM

CygnusDarius: I alone am best: Mad_Radhu: Cagey B: Capable of supporting Earth-like life, perhaps. I'm tired of the assumption that any form of life that occurs in the universe will look anything like what it does here.

It's easy to day there could be alternative biochemistry involved, but when you start looking into the details of how those biochemistries would function you start running into problems where the chemical bonds formed by silicon are too strong for it to make a good alternative to carbon, and ammonia makes a crappy substitute for water due to weak hydrogen bonds and a low surface tension. Plus you have the fact that hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon are among the most common elements in the universe, so it isn't an accident that they are used for biological processes.

We'll see what happens when we look more closely at moons like Titan in the outer solar system where methane-based life might work, but it's possible that the basic chemistry just doesn't work out on forms of life that are too far removed from our own. I'd love to see some really exotic life, but reading about some of the problems with alternative biochemistry gives me some cause to think it just isn't as easy getting life started with those building blocks.

Additionaly given the same conditions on the planet(I.E. gravity, atmospheric pressure, carbon based life blah blah blah). I wouldn't think life from another planet would be all that much different in appearance than life on earth.

[arealiensreal.org image 283x343]


Captain's log, star date..... aw screw it. I got lucky last night with a chick that had three boobs!
 
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