If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(BusinessWeek)   Feed me a stray cat   (businessweek.com) divider line 53
    More: Interesting, stray cat, heating and cooling, UTX, EBITDA, berg Businessweek, time studies, equity, workstations  
•       •       •

3470 clicks; posted to Business » on 27 Apr 2012 at 11:58 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



53 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-04-27 12:07:26 PM
TRY GETTING A RESERVATION AT DORSIA NOW YOU FARKING STUPID BASTARD!!!!!
 
2012-04-27 12:07:56 PM
Ah, there we go. Bullshiat justification for the job-killing likes of Bain Capital. I knew it was only a matter of time before these started popping up like flies on shiat.
 
2012-04-27 12:28:17 PM
Justification? Have you ever been inside a warehouse? Most are men just standing around waiting, they are prime to be streamlined.
 
2012-04-27 12:31:37 PM

steamingpile: they are prime to be streamlined.


Much like yourself, I expect.
 
2012-04-27 12:38:41 PM
The dust, black and sticky, consists mostly of tread particles from solid-rubber forklift wheels. It lies a quarter-inch thick on the concrete.

Okay... Where in the seeking of efficiency does A MAJOR FIRE HAZARD rank?

Streamlining and improving efficency are one thing, but what Bain Capital did to Dunkin' Donuts was to replace in store talent with centralized manufacturing and dispenseries. The same model at Domino's would be to replace everything with frozen cheese pizzas that could be thawed before adding toppings.

shiat, I probably shouldn't post that last line, it's like a Rule 34 of private equity.
 
2012-04-27 12:46:51 PM
"Efficiency" has given private equity partners a reputation as hatchet men

No, I'm pretty sure it's "load this new company we just bought with as much debt as they can carry and then keep all the money for ourselves while they go under" that's accomplished that well-deserved impression.
 
2012-04-27 12:47:41 PM
Cold, soul-crushing efficiency. Welcome to the future, where you earn less, work more and can hope for nothing.
 
2012-04-27 12:56:46 PM
I'm as libby lib as they come, but I don't see a problem with making things more efficient.

What I have a HUGE problem with, and what the article totally glossed over was, "What do you do with the workers you had to cut loose when you created efficiency?"

Japanese society has old age pensions and they support arts and academics. They people who are cut have some where to go, some thing to do. They find support for their own small business so they can spend their lives doing something they love doing.

Here we show someone the door if they are too expensive, or we get a machine to do their job, or "create efficiency"

If we want our companies to follow this model, then we have to get our society to follow this model as well.

Japanese tax rates are PROGRESSIVE. 40% for those earning more than 18 million yen ($233,000) 33% on 9 million yen (110,000).

If you want to make money by making things more efficient it doesn't help your society to create unemployment and poverty with your process.

Our noble investors from the article just want to have the benefit of efficiency without worrying about the societal costs.

/Japan's unemployment peaked at 5.5% in 2009
// and they are recovering from a Katrina x10 way better than we have.
///fark you GOP, and Rmoney.
 
2012-04-27 12:59:34 PM
I could make a comment on this forum that would, literally, blow your mind. It would be insightful, humorous and candid without appearing in the least way obnoxious or ridiculous. It would rank amongst such utterances as those that left the lips of Socrates, Pryor, Lincoln or Churchill and totally fark up your mind for the rest of the farking year. But, alas, my time cannot be spent educating the likes of buffoons such as you as I have a life to lead and I just want ... to fit in.

Listen, you'll have to excuse me. I have a lunch meeting with Cliff Huxtable at the Four Seasons in 20 minutes.
 
2012-04-27 01:05:41 PM

historycat: I'm as libby lib as they come, but I don't see a problem with making things more efficient.

What I have a HUGE problem with, and what the article totally glossed over was, "What do you do with the workers you had to cut loose when you created efficiency?"


That was mostly the crux of my original comment, though maybe not stated so plainly.
Efficiency is good, it's just that there are so many other things sacrificed in the name of efficiency that the costs don't outweigh the benefits. Laying off 75 workers in Yuma and consolidating your warehouse elsewhere might be good for your bottom line, but it adds to the unemployment roles, the fuel costs of trucking from your more centralized location, and limits your ability to expand in the future.
The future, that's really all this is about. "Efficiency" is becoming just another term for when the propertied class wants their money immediately, nevermind a thriving business or sustainable business plan for later on down the line.
 
2012-04-27 01:14:48 PM

Sergeant Grumbles: historycat: I'm as libby lib as they come, but I don't see a problem with making things more efficient.

What I have a HUGE problem with, and what the article totally glossed over was, "What do you do with the workers you had to cut loose when you created efficiency?"

That was mostly the crux of my original comment, though maybe not stated so plainly.
Efficiency is good, it's just that there are so many other things sacrificed in the name of efficiency that the costs don't outweigh the benefits. Laying off 75 workers in Yuma and consolidating your warehouse elsewhere might be good for your bottom line, but it adds to the unemployment roles, the fuel costs of trucking from your more centralized location, and limits your ability to expand in the future.
The future, that's really all this is about. "Efficiency" is becoming just another term for when the propertied class wants their money immediately, nevermind a thriving business or sustainable business plan for later on down the line.



Oh, I totally agree with you, as soon as the term "vulture" capitalism was thrown around I also knew the Fox News / Liberty Univerversity team was going into high gear to find a rationalization.

I just want someone to ask Rmoney why, if he's making business more efficient, he doesn't support programs to assist those who did nothing wrong outside of being hired by the wrong company.

The GOP is the epitome of "I got mine, and that's someone else's problem" Which was totally summed up in their response to the Occupy protestors when they asked why didn't they go get jobs.
 
2012-04-27 01:16:36 PM

majestic: Cold, soul-crushing efficiency. Welcome to the future, where you earn less, work more and can hope for nothing.


Efficiency is a corporate-generated dream world built to keep us under control in order to change a human being into this.

www.biblewheel.com
 
2012-04-27 01:25:27 PM

wildcardjack: but what Bain Capital did to Dunkin' Donuts was to replace in store talent with centralized manufacturing and dispenseries


Did you just call a donut shop worker "Talent"?
 
2012-04-27 01:36:00 PM

Kurmudgeon: steamingpile: they are prime to be streamlined.

Much like yourself, I expect.


Most of you have never and will never run a business so paying money to people to just stand around means nothing to you but when you run a business and see people standing around its like money flying away.
 
2012-04-27 01:37:33 PM

historycat: I'm as libby lib as they come, but I don't see a problem with making things more efficient.

What I have a HUGE problem with, and what the article totally glossed over was, "What do you do with the workers you had to cut loose when you created efficiency?"

Japanese society has old age pensions and they support arts and academics. They people who are cut have some where to go, some thing to do. They find support for their own small business so they can spend their lives doing something they love doing.

Here we show someone the door if they are too expensive, or we get a machine to do their job, or "create efficiency"

If we want our companies to follow this model, then we have to get our society to follow this model as well.

Japanese tax rates are PROGRESSIVE. 40% for those earning more than 18 million yen ($233,000) 33% on 9 million yen (110,000).

If you want to make money by making things more efficient it doesn't help your society to create unemployment and poverty with your process.

Our noble investors from the article just want to have the benefit of efficiency without worrying about the societal costs.

/Japan's unemployment peaked at 5.5% in 2009
// and they are recovering from a Katrina x10 way better than we have.
///fark you GOP, and Rmoney.


You do realize japans economy is in the shiatter right don't you? Besides japan has something called honor and that left americans decades ago.
 
2012-04-27 01:48:23 PM

imontheinternet: majestic: Cold, soul-crushing efficiency. Welcome to the future, where you earn less, work more and can hope for nothing.

Efficiency is a corporate-generated dream world built to keep us under control in order to change a human being into this.

[www.biblewheel.com image 540x330]


It doesn't take efficiency to keep people under control and de-humanize them. Ever seen the DMV?
 
2012-04-27 01:55:52 PM

steamingpile: Most of you have never and will never run a business so paying money to people to just stand around means nothing to you but when you run a business and see people standing around its like money flying away.



You sound like one of those asshole bosses who drives their workers into fits of machine-gun-toting rampages.
Human beings are not machines. They cannot move & work 10 hours a day without stopping for a breather now & then*

*unless they're Foxconn employees.
 
2012-04-27 01:58:53 PM
images.wikia.com

Really? I'm the first?
 
2012-04-27 02:00:30 PM
bestbusinesscardever.com
 
2012-04-27 03:01:27 PM
Everything in that article sounded pretty reasonable. The fact is, we probably shouldn't be doing much traditional manufacturing in the United States. Blue collar jobs will be lost, but that's the way of things and can't be avoided. We should, though, have much better government provided job retraining programs for the unskilled workers who are no longer useful to our economy.
 
2012-04-27 03:13:20 PM

tricycleracer: [bestbusinesscardever.com image 482x313]


No watermark. What, did you go to Brown or something?
 
2012-04-27 03:14:42 PM

Actual Farking: Everything in that article sounded pretty reasonable. The fact is, we probably shouldn't be doing much traditional manufacturing in the United States. Blue collar jobs will be lost, but that's the way of things and can't be avoided. We should, though, have much better government provided job retraining programs for the unskilled workers who are no longer useful to our economy.


And UI to keep them "in the black" until the next paycheck rolls in. And food stamps to make sure their dependents don't want for food. And public health insurance (with premia, to placate objectivist morons who want to be obsessively sure that everyone has lesion-free skin in the game) so that unemployment is not a "hope I don't get a chronic condition this year" risk.

// probably a few other things I missed
 
2012-04-27 03:21:52 PM

Dr Dreidel: Actual Farking: Everything in that article sounded pretty reasonable. The fact is, we probably shouldn't be doing much traditional manufacturing in the United States. Blue collar jobs will be lost, but that's the way of things and can't be avoided. We should, though, have much better government provided job retraining programs for the unskilled workers who are no longer useful to our economy.

And UI to keep them "in the black" until the next paycheck rolls in. And food stamps to make sure their dependents don't want for food. And public health insurance (with premia, to placate objectivist morons who want to be obsessively sure that everyone has lesion-free skin in the game) so that unemployment is not a "hope I don't get a chronic condition this year" risk.

// probably a few other things I missed


I wouldn't disagree with any of that stuff. I just think too many government subsidies and protectionist trade policies designed to protect the american manufacturing sector are just inefficiently slowing an inevitable outcome.
 
2012-04-27 03:29:49 PM

steamingpile: Kurmudgeon: steamingpile: t

Most of you have never and will never run a business so paying money to people to just stand around means nothing to you but when you run a business and see people standing around its like money flying away.


Actually I have and I do. Unlike the current model of "manager/owner", I actually do expect my employees to relax when they can because I expect them to bust their asses when they need to.
 
2012-04-27 03:35:27 PM

steamingpile: You do realize japans economy is in the shiatter right don't you? Besides japan has something called honor and that left americans decades ago.


Link

Citation please? Their economy grew 25% by since 2005.
 
2012-04-27 03:43:00 PM

historycat: steamingpile: You do realize japans economy is in the shiatter right don't you? Besides japan has something called honor and that left americans decades ago.

Link

Citation please? Their economy grew 25% by since 2005.


They still have 0 or negative interest rates.
 
2012-04-27 03:53:59 PM

wildcardjack: The dust, black and sticky, consists mostly of tread particles from solid-rubber forklift wheels. It lies a quarter-inch thick on the concrete.

Okay... Where in the seeking of efficiency does A MAJOR FIRE HAZARD rank?

Streamlining and improving efficency are one thing, but what Bain Capital did to Dunkin' Donuts was to replace in store talent with centralized manufacturing and dispenseries. The same model at Domino's would be to replace everything with frozen cheese pizzas that could be thawed before adding toppings.

shiat, I probably shouldn't post that last line, it's like a Rule 34 of private equity.


What do you think those "Artisan" pizzas that Dominos mysteriously refuses to let you alter any of the toppings on are
 
2012-04-27 04:08:13 PM

bhcompy: historycat: steamingpile: You do realize japans economy is in the shiatter right don't you? Besides japan has something called honor and that left americans decades ago.

Link

Citation please? Their economy grew 25% by since 2005.

They still have 0 or negative interest rates.


Interest rates are not the only sign of a healthy economy. Their economy functions differently than ours, which is what I was talking about above. Your paradigm needs to fit in more factors.
 
2012-04-27 04:15:54 PM

historycat: bhcompy: historycat: steamingpile: You do realize japans economy is in the shiatter right don't you? Besides japan has something called honor and that left americans decades ago.

Link

Citation please? Their economy grew 25% by since 2005.

They still have 0 or negative interest rates.

Interest rates are not the only sign of a healthy economy. Their economy functions differently than ours, which is what I was talking about above. Your paradigm needs to fit in more factors.


(2 hours ago) The Bank of Japan said Friday it will expand its balance sheet 5 trillion yen ($62 billion) to 70 trillion yen through purchases of government bonds, exchange-traded funds and Japan real estate investment trusts as the country struggles with years of deflation.

Pretty sure deflation is bad.

"Although Japan's economic activity has remained more or less flat, it has become increasingly evident that the economy is shifting toward a pick-up phase as positive developments have become widespread," the statement said.

Translation: Our economy is flat, but it's looking good in the future as long as we get over the current hump by dumping $5trillion more into the economy
 
2012-04-27 05:10:01 PM

historycat: steamingpile: You do realize japans economy is in the shiatter right don't you? Besides japan has something called honor and that left americans decades ago.

Link

Citation please? Their economy grew 25% by since 2005.


Gotta be honest. Anyone who doesn't know how bad Japan's economy has been for over a decade may want to avoid speaking on matters of economics.
 
2012-04-27 05:58:56 PM

egomann: wildcardjack: but what Bain Capital did to Dunkin' Donuts was to replace in store talent with centralized manufacturing and dispenseries

Did you just call a donut shop worker "Talent"?

Can you make an above-average donut? Dunkin' Donuts built a reputation on having a quality product - which, yes, calls for talented (OK, say "competent", if you feel strongly about it) employees. Bain took over and started selling decidedly average product under a brand name associated with high quality, gambling that enough people would be willing to eat garbage if it was just marketed as food., and pocketing the difference. This is known as "adding value" in the 21st century US.
 
2012-04-27 06:34:46 PM
Well, this TPS system explains what corporate is trying (and failing miserably) to do with inventory...
 
2012-04-27 07:00:52 PM

meat0918: Well, this TPS system explains what corporate is trying (and failing miserably) to do with inventory...


Actually, a TPS would show that really well. That's kinda why Transaction Processing Systems exist. They show what's really happening, not just what's forecast.
 
2012-04-27 07:03:54 PM
That's a very fine chardonnay you're drinking. I want you to clean your vagina.
 
2012-04-27 07:11:39 PM

schattenteufel: steamingpile: Most of you have never and will never run a business so paying money to people to just stand around means nothing to you but when you run a business and see people standing around its like money flying away.


You sound like one of those asshole bosses who drives their workers into fits of machine-gun-toting rampages.
Human beings are not machines. They cannot move & work 10 hours a day without stopping for a breather now & then*

*unless they're Foxconn employees.


Actually my employees love me, I never assign more than they can handle and let them off early almost every Friday and work half or so on 3-4 day weekends. Everyone knows nobody is working hard in those days anyway, the problem with warehouse workers is that a lot of them are there because they have no option or don't care to build a skill set. I ran into very few that worked hard and those that did got moved into the office for different work.
 
2012-04-27 07:14:21 PM

Gonz: meat0918: Well, this TPS system explains what corporate is trying (and failing miserably) to do with inventory...

Actually, a TPS would show that really well. That's kinda why Transaction Processing Systems exist. They show what's really happening, not just what's forecast.


What's really happening is we are so busy we can't keep parts on the shelves to build what we build, and we have 3 month lead times from our suppliers for some of these parts.

Things are looking up though. It was 6 month lead times on some parts 2 years ago.

Now if I could just get the salesmen to stop selling things that don't exist yet and then acting the fool when we tell them what they sold doesn't exist yet (but is usually doable), and will cost the customer an extra chunk of change to implement, and then having to eat the software development costs, making my numbers look bad; all the while having the salesmen complain to my boss that our department and engineering is lying to the salesmen about stuff they sell not existing quite yet.
 
2012-04-27 07:18:16 PM

bhcompy: historycat: bhcompy: historycat: steamingpile: You do realize japans economy is in the shiatter right don't you? Besides japan has something called honor and that left americans decades ago.

Link

Citation please? Their economy grew 25% by since 2005.

They still have 0 or negative interest rates.

Interest rates are not the only sign of a healthy economy. Their economy functions differently than ours, which is what I was talking about above. Your paradigm needs to fit in more factors.

(2 hours ago) The Bank of Japan said Friday it will expand its balance sheet 5 trillion yen ($62 billion) to 70 trillion yen through purchases of government bonds, exchange-traded funds and Japan real estate investment trusts as the country struggles with years of deflation.

Pretty sure deflation is bad.

"Although Japan's economic activity has remained more or less flat, it has become increasingly evident that the economy is shifting toward a pick-up phase as positive developments have become widespread," the statement said.

Translation: Our economy is flat, but it's looking good in the future as long as we get over the current hump by dumping $5trillion more into the economy


Japan has had shiat growth for a while, the only reason they recovered from the tsunami so quickly is because the entire world pitched in and gave them aid. But let him believe their economy is great when every other indicator says otherwise.
 
2012-04-27 07:24:59 PM

meat0918: Gonz: meat0918: Well, this TPS system explains what corporate is trying (and failing miserably) to do with inventory...

Actually, a TPS would show that really well. That's kinda why Transaction Processing Systems exist. They show what's really happening, not just what's forecast.

What's really happening is we are so busy we can't keep parts on the shelves to build what we build, and we have 3 month lead times from our suppliers for some of these parts.

Things are looking up though. It was 6 month lead times on some parts 2 years ago.

Now if I could just get the salesmen to stop selling things that don't exist yet and then acting the fool when we tell them what they sold doesn't exist yet (but is usually doable), and will cost the customer an extra chunk of change to implement, and then having to eat the software development costs, making my numbers look bad; all the while having the salesmen complain to my boss that our department and engineering is lying to the salesmen about stuff they sell not existing quite yet.


Holy fark you sound like me most days, I got one of our old sales managers fired because he kept promising deadlines he knew was impossible even after I warned him a dozen times that it makes us look bad. I wrote up a spreadsheet telling him accurate lead times for completion of our most frequent jobs and the farker still lied, so when the boss came to ask him wtf happened when a large client pulled out of an order he blamed me, I simply pulled out my folder of all the spreadsheets with the sales force signatures along with his and even printed out email exchange.

The boss let him go that night, farker still blames it on everyone else and tried to steal one of our clients before we informed him he couldn't because of the non compete.
 
2012-04-27 07:38:40 PM

historycat: I'm as libby lib as they come, but I don't see a problem with making things more efficient.


Efficiency leads to fragility. If something is as efficient as possible, a minor change will cause it to break. Some purposeful redundancy is a good thing.
 
2012-04-27 08:27:27 PM

steamingpile: meat0918: Gonz: meat0918:
I wrote up a spreadsheet telling him .


FU.
 
2012-04-27 08:31:48 PM

Magorn: wildcardjack: Yada

Streamlining and improving efficency are one thing, but what Bain Capital did to Dunkin' Donuts was to replace in store talent with centralized manufacturing and dispenseries. The same model at Domino's would be to replace everything with frozen cheese pizzas that could be thawed before adding toppings.

shiat, I probably shouldn't post that last line, it's like a Rule 34 of private equity.

What do you think those "Artisan" pizzas that Dominos mysteriously refuses to let you alter any of the toppings on are


Double shiat. I bet I had a suspicion about those in the back of my mind. But it's not a complete business revamp. They still have people throwing together pizzas, putting them in the oven. A full on Bainiation would be to replace the prep line with a freezer rack, order taking in centralized to a call center in Bangladesh, and giving the drivers... Wait a second, that last item is where I'm going to make my money.

/Snowcrash had a point about the pizza
 
2012-04-27 09:16:07 PM

historycat: What I have a HUGE problem with, and what the article totally glossed over was, "What do you do with the workers you had to cut loose when you created efficiency?"


What do you do with them when a competitor emerges that decides to implement the efficiencies that you won't and puts you out of business? Perhaps you'd then decide that the government must step in and declare that any competitor must operate its business in exactly the same way as yours?

It's a sad fact that some people will lose jobs. If you want economic growth, greater productivity is how it's achieved, and making more with less is always going to result in fewer people needed to produce a given quantity of goods. Perhaps government can help cushion the blow a bit, but not to the extent of forever supporting people who lost a job.
 
2012-04-27 09:24:29 PM

steamingpile: the problem with warehouse workers is that a lot of them are there because they have no option or don't care to build a skill set. I ran into very few that worked hard and those that did got moved into the office for different work.


i49.tinypic.com
 
2012-04-27 11:38:28 PM

majestic: steamingpile: meat0918: Gonz: meat0918:
I wrote up a spreadsheet telling him .

FU.


Awww are you someone who got fired for being incompetent or did a simple MS document fark you over in one of you numerous jobs?

jjorsett: steamingpile: the problem with warehouse workers is that a lot of them are there because they have no option or don't care to build a skill set. I ran into very few that worked hard and those that did got moved into the office for different work.

[i49.tinypic.com image 480x360]


LOL, sometimes it happens..........rarely though two kinds of warehouse workers, college kids making cash and 40 year olds trying to make money for weed, thats about it.
 
2012-04-28 07:41:47 AM

Sergeant Grumbles: Ah, there we go. Bullshiat justification for the job-killing likes of Bain Capital. I knew it was only a matter of time before these started popping up like flies on shiat.


You think that inefficiency is good for the economy and (in the long run) creates jobs? Please explain.

/better yet: don't
 
2012-04-28 07:45:52 AM

majestic: Cold, soul-crushing efficiency. Welcome to the future, where you earn less, work more and can hope for nothing.


Actually, efficiency is what's given us the highest standard of living and the most leisure time that the planet has ever seen. There's a reason that a Cambodian rice farmer lives in a hut and a US rice farmer lives in a house. Hint: one uses a tractor and one uses a water buffalo.

Feel free to start a business and run it at less than optimum efficiency. Heck, you could hire people to just stand around and do nothing all day. Give them full benefits and time and a half for overtime.
 
2012-04-28 07:57:44 AM

historycat: I'm as libby lib as they come, but I don't see a problem with making things more efficient.

What I have a HUGE problem with, and what the article totally glossed over was, "What do you do with the workers you had to cut loose when you created efficiency?"


Efficiency will give the owners and the company's customers more money. That money will be spent, creating jobs.

or

What did they do with all the people who used to carry things after the wheel was invented.
 
2012-04-28 11:36:26 AM

Actual Farking: We should, though, have much better government provided job retraining programs for the unskilled workers who are no longer useful to our economy.


Let me say it, since I say it every time someone says 'retraining'.

RETRAINING TO DO FARKING WHAT?

What is it, short of MDs (and that's pretty arguable) is it that we are short of? What job title is it that I can't go and find 5000 of? Computer programmers? If you're willing to accept someone over 29 who might not want to work 90-hour-weeks, there are tens of thousands available. Nurses? Really, I know plenty who only get fill-in shifts.

Now, get this. Half of the US workforce have 2-digit IQs. Always have. Always will. Harsh to admit, but true.

What do you propose retraining them to do, that they're in any way capable of, that we don't have farktons of already?

This is what Germany, Japan, and many other countries have realized in defending domestic manufacturing. There really are millions of middling-average workers. It may not be 'optimally efficient' to protect their jobs. But, it really helps society as a whole work.
 
2012-04-28 12:40:46 PM

DrPainMD: That money will be spent, creating jobs.


Just one more tax cut, right? Then, the flood gates will open and we'll be drowning in jobs.
 
2012-04-28 10:26:14 PM
i306.photobucket.com
 
Displayed 50 of 53 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report