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(Yahoo)   It turns out that when you join the military, there are limits on both your speech and your personal freedom to make choices. Who knew?   (finance.yahoo.com) divider line 295
    More: Followup, personal freedoms, Facebook, Gary Kreep, United States Justice Foundation, Timonium, commissioned officers, Marine Corps, sergeants  
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11367 clicks; posted to Main » on 25 Apr 2012 at 11:18 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-04-26 12:16:03 AM  
You are really defending this obvious idiot? Either he didnt read the code of conduct, didnt understand it, both or willfully and knowingly violated it multiple times and dipshiatingly publically.

Wow. The Marines have more Uuproblems than I thohTught. Semper Why?

// marine grandfather was no oboma fan but would cockpunch this disgrace out of principle
 
2012-04-26 12:16:21 AM  

9beers: "Screw Obama and I will not follow all orders from him."

That's a pretty weak reason for taking a soldiers career away. Some extra duty, restrictions or maybe an Article 15 would have been more appropriate.


Okie_Gunslinger: I agree some sort of reprimand is in order but discharging him for a flippant remark seems needless. My guess is that they wanted to make an example of him.


Or maybe because the guy was warned - as stated in the linked article - before any action was taken against him for his breaking of the rules for all service personnel. The gentleman in question continued with this actions and was then disciplined for them.

If you're told not to do something and then continued to do that something, you're removed from your job. End of story. How many warnings are you willing to give someone who is DELIBERATELY disobeying a command from his CO? Since that sort of thing destroys the chain of command and undermines the entire unit, command was left with no further options and had to remove the offender.
 
2012-04-26 12:16:23 AM  
This guy was enlisted. He's not allowed to decide if an order is legal or not. Only officers can do that.
 
2012-04-26 12:16:34 AM  
garapanegarapan.files.wordpress.com
douggilmer.files.wordpress.com
www.fototime.com
 
2012-04-26 12:19:48 AM  

foo monkey: This guy was enlisted. He's not allowed to decide if an order is legal or not. Only officers can do that.


Nope, not true. If you are an enlisted private and some colonel walks up to you and tells you to go into some village and start mowing down civilians, you can refuse it as unlawful. Another interesting military fact I learned in Basic training: If you are enlisted, even a private, but are a combat MOS and you are with an officer who is a non combat MOS, you are in charge, even if he/she's a general. I mean, good luck ever finding yourself in that scenario, but it's true. I wouldn't have a clue how to google that to back it up, but it was in one of the many boring classroom lessons on military law you go through.
 
2012-04-26 12:21:11 AM  
clarification: the private/general scenario. If you are in a combat situation like a firefight etc...
 
2012-04-26 12:22:16 AM  

Elmo Jones: Your heart belongs to Jesus, but your ass belongs to ME!

/that is all


Meg. That guy stood on stage during a USO event, in uniform, badmouthing the President and his socialism. Wassamatta, does it impede our slide into fascism?
 
2012-04-26 12:23:11 AM  

HipShot: Gecko Gingrich: Who knew?

Every service member who bothers to read the rules of conduct that they must adhere to while serving.

This, failmitter.


I'm pretty sure thats the joke, morons.
 
2012-04-26 12:23:53 AM  

Mixolydian Master: foo monkey: This guy was enlisted. He's not allowed to decide if an order is legal or not. Only officers can do that.

Nope, not true. If you are an enlisted private and some colonel walks up to you and tells you to go into some village and start mowing down civilians, you can refuse it as unlawful. Another interesting military fact I learned in Basic training: If you are enlisted, even a private, but are a combat MOS and you are with an officer who is a non combat MOS, you are in charge, even if he/she's a general. I mean, good luck ever finding yourself in that scenario, but it's true. I wouldn't have a clue how to google that to back it up, but it was in one of the many boring classroom lessons on military law you go through.


You cannot back that up, it is not a true statement. That officer cannot give you orders if they are not in your chain of command.
 
2012-04-26 12:23:55 AM  
From TFA: The Marines acted after saying Stein stated March 1 on a Facebook page used by Marine meteorologists, "Screw Obama and I will not follow all orders from him."

What did he think Obama was going to order him to do, issue a METAR that confirmed global climate change?
 
2012-04-26 12:25:55 AM  

Mixolydian Master: If you are enlisted, even a private, but are a combat MOS and you are with an officer who is a non combat MOS, you are in charge, even if he/she's a general.


Wait, what? That's not true at all.
 
2012-04-26 12:26:08 AM  

Mixolydian Master: Another interesting military fact I learned in Basic training: If you are enlisted, even a private, but are a combat MOS and you are with an officer who is a non combat MOS, you are in charge, even if he/she's a general./


What does MOS mean?
 
2012-04-26 12:27:39 AM  

redhook: Mixolydian Master: foo monkey: This guy was enlisted. He's not allowed to decide if an order is legal or not. Only officers can do that.

Nope, not true. If you are an enlisted private and some colonel walks up to you and tells you to go into some village and start mowing down civilians, you can refuse it as unlawful. Another interesting military fact I learned in Basic training: If you are enlisted, even a private, but are a combat MOS and you are with an officer who is a non combat MOS, you are in charge, even if he/she's a general. I mean, good luck ever finding yourself in that scenario, but it's true. I wouldn't have a clue how to google that to back it up, but it was in one of the many boring classroom lessons on military law you go through.

You cannot back that up, it is not a true statement. That officer cannot give you orders if they are not in your chain of command.


It's true. Clergy, lawyers, and doctors can't command combat troops. Not without the proper training.
 
2012-04-26 12:27:41 AM  

redhook: Mixolydian Master: foo monkey: This guy was enlisted. He's not allowed to decide if an order is legal or not. Only officers can do that.

Nope, not true. If you are an enlisted private and some colonel walks up to you and tells you to go into some village and start mowing down civilians, you can refuse it as unlawful. Another interesting military fact I learned in Basic training: If you are enlisted, even a private, but are a combat MOS and you are with an officer who is a non combat MOS, you are in charge, even if he/she's a general. I mean, good luck ever finding yourself in that scenario, but it's true. I wouldn't have a clue how to google that to back it up, but it was in one of the many boring classroom lessons on military law you go through.

You cannot back that up, it is not a true statement. That officer cannot give you orders if they are not in your chain of command.


Dude, what?1 I was in the Army for 5 years. I worked in Landstuhl, Germany hospital. There were many many many many many officers that were not in my chain of command. If I didn't do what they said, you would find yourself in the front leaning rest position. All officers are over the enlisted, even separate branches. Scenario: A private goes to another military post to pick up some supplies. A Lt Colonel gives him an order. He tells him to fark off cause he's not in his chain of command. You think he'd say "my bad, carry on."

Someone misinformed you
 
2012-04-26 12:28:24 AM  

Gecko Gingrich: Who knew?

Every service member who bothers to read the rules of conduct that they must adhere to while serving.


So, nobody.
 
2012-04-26 12:28:29 AM  
According to my father (active duty for 22 years), this applied to military dependents, too. Hell, I was 19 before I was allowed to have my own opinion about anything; and when it didn't agree with his opinion, I was kicked out of the house. I wasn't living there anymore, so it wasn't that bad, but when I was growing up, his opinion was the only opinion. And they wonder why I rarely talk to them and refused to join the military after high school.
 
2012-04-26 12:29:08 AM  

Mixolydian Master: foo monkey: This guy was enlisted. He's not allowed to decide if an order is legal or not. Only officers can do that.

Nope, not true. If you are an enlisted private and some colonel walks up to you and tells you to go into some village and start mowing down civilians, you can refuse it as unlawful. Another interesting military fact I learned in Basic training: If you are enlisted, even a private, but are a combat MOS and you are with an officer who is a non combat MOS, you are in charge, even if he/she's a general. I mean, good luck ever finding yourself in that scenario, but it's true. I wouldn't have a clue how to google that to back it up, but it was in one of the many boring classroom lessons on military law you go through.


To be clear here though, this asstards idea of what is legal or not is pretty dubious. It has to be clearly and obviously illegal not an "i think" judgement call. Things like the Geneva convention are pretty clear.
 
2012-04-26 12:31:18 AM  
That only applies to the phony soldiers.
 
2012-04-26 12:31:39 AM  

9beers: Mixolydian Master: If you are enlisted, even a private, but are a combat MOS and you are with an officer who is a non combat MOS, you are in charge, even if he/she's a general.

Wait, what? That's not true at all.


I swear to god we were taught that in basic training. The rational was that the combnat trained enlisted soldier had much better training to survive a combat situation than some army colonel who was a dentist, so in duress, the rank goes to the more combat ready soldier. I remember we all got a real farking kick out of that and made a million jokes about what we would make them do during that brief moment we would be in charge.
 
2012-04-26 12:37:32 AM  

thatboyoverthere: 9beers: During a hearing, a military prosecutor submitted screen grabs of Stein's postings on one Facebook page he created called Armed Forces Tea Party, which the prosecutor said included the image of Obama on a "Jackass" movie poster. Stein also superimposed Obama's image on a poster for "The Incredibles" movie that he changed to "The Horribles," military prosecutor Capt. John Torresala said.

I'm changing my opinion, screw this asshole, he got what he deserved. I originally thought this was all over a single post.

Guys......9beers just admit he's wrong. I'm scared. Someone hold me.


Holy shiat. Could Xmas Alt try to do a heel turn?
 
2012-04-26 12:38:36 AM  

9beers: "Screw Obama and I will not follow all orders from him."

That's a pretty weak reason for taking a soldiers career away. Some extra duty, restrictions or maybe an Article 15 would have been more appropriate.



This article left out alot of details leading up to this event.

That was 1 excerpt. He repeatedly posted inflammatory political opinions, even started an Fb group about Tea party politics. He was warned by military lawyers to knock it off several times over a period of several months before they finally brought him up on charges.

His claim that 15 words ended his career is deliberate BS to garner sympathy and attention. His courtmartial is the result of a refusal by him to heed repeated warnings to cease an action that is clearly prohibited by the UCMJ.

And for the record I hate Obama. I am a vet myself. Served under Clinton primarily and kept my dislike for him to myself during that service.
 
2012-04-26 12:39:56 AM  

9beers: "Screw Obama and I will not follow all orders from him."

That's a pretty weak reason for taking a soldiers career away. Some extra duty, restrictions or maybe an Article 15 would have been more appropriate.


Don't let the GOPtard writeups fool you. As is buried way down the article, the guy had been reprimanded more than once already, and didn't listen. This wasn't an isolated incident.
 
2012-04-26 12:39:59 AM  

Mixolydian Master: I swear to god we were taught that in basic training. The rational was that the combnat trained enlisted soldier had much better training to survive a combat situation than some army colonel who was a dentist, so in duress, the rank goes to the more combat ready soldier. I remember we all got a real farking kick out of that and made a million jokes about what we would make them do during that brief moment we would be in charge.


If I had found myself in the middle of a firefight and a PFC started barking orders at me, I'd listen to him because he's the guy with experience, not because it's regulation. At the same time, when I crewed a helicopter, senior officers listened to me when I told them what to do, not because they had to, because it made sense to.
 
2012-04-26 12:42:01 AM  

theMightyRegeya: Elmo Jones: Your heart belongs to Jesus, but your ass belongs to ME!

/that is all

Meg. That guy stood on stage during a USO event, in uniform, badmouthing the President and his socialism. Wassamatta, does it impede our slide into fascism?


Retired. Apologized.
 
2012-04-26 12:42:33 AM  

ThePastafarian: Holy shiat. Could Xmas Alt try to do a heel turn?


Get it right, dude.

i41.tinypic.com
 
2012-04-26 12:45:07 AM  

Mixolydian Master: redhook: Mixolydian Master: foo monkey: This guy was enlisted. He's not allowed to decide if an order is legal or not. Only officers can do that.

Nope, not true. If you are an enlisted private and some colonel walks up to you and tells you to go into some village and start mowing down civilians, you can refuse it as unlawful. Another interesting military fact I learned in Basic training: If you are enlisted, even a private, but are a combat MOS and you are with an officer who is a non combat MOS, you are in charge, even if he/she's a general. I mean, good luck ever finding yourself in that scenario, but it's true. I wouldn't have a clue how to google that to back it up, but it was in one of the many boring classroom lessons on military law you go through.

You cannot back that up, it is not a true statement. That officer cannot give you orders if they are not in your chain of command.

Dude, what?1 I was in the Army for 5 years. I worked in Landstuhl, Germany hospital. There were many many many many many officers that were not in my chain of command. If I didn't do what they said, you would find yourself in the front leaning rest position. All officers are over the enlisted, even separate branches. Scenario: A private goes to another military post to pick up some supplies. A Lt Colonel gives him an order. He tells him to fark off cause he's not in his chain of command. You think he'd say "my bad, carry on."

Someone misinformed you


If a private goes to another post he falls under that posts chain of command while there. And disrespecting a superior commissioned officer is a violation of Article 89 of the UCMJ. Article 91 comes close to backing you up but still no cigar.

http://usmilitary.about.com/od/punitivearticles/a/mcm91.htm

"(2) willfully disobeys the lawful order of a warrant officer, noncommissioned officer, or petty officer;"
 
2012-04-26 12:49:43 AM  
Orders given by officers have the additional constraint that it must the junior's superior officer who gives the order Article 90(2)

http://usmilitary.about.com/od/punitivearticles/a/mcm90.htm
 
2012-04-26 12:51:16 AM  
I still don't understand what the limits to speech were, he posted his rants didn't he?
 
2012-04-26 12:52:28 AM  
Didn't read that fine print.
 
2012-04-26 12:52:55 AM  

redhook: Mixolydian Master: redhook: Mixolydian Master: foo monkey: This guy was enlisted. He's not allowed to decide if an order is legal or not. Only officers can do that.

Nope, not true. If you are an enlisted private and some colonel walks up to you and tells you to go into some village and start mowing down civilians, you can refuse it as unlawful. Another interesting military fact I learned in Basic training: If you are enlisted, even a private, but are a combat MOS and you are with an officer who is a non combat MOS, you are in charge, even if he/she's a general. I mean, good luck ever finding yourself in that scenario, but it's true. I wouldn't have a clue how to google that to back it up, but it was in one of the many boring classroom lessons on military law you go through.

You cannot back that up, it is not a true statement. That officer cannot give you orders if they are not in your chain of command.

Dude, what?1 I was in the Army for 5 years. I worked in Landstuhl, Germany hospital. There were many many many many many officers that were not in my chain of command. If I didn't do what they said, you would find yourself in the front leaning rest position. All officers are over the enlisted, even separate branches. Scenario: A private goes to another military post to pick up some supplies. A Lt Colonel gives him an order. He tells him to fark off cause he's not in his chain of command. You think he'd say "my bad, carry on."

Someone misinformed you

If a private goes to another post he falls under that posts chain of command while there. And disrespecting a superior commissioned officer is a violation of Article 89 of the UCMJ. Article 91 comes close to backing you up but still no cigar.

http://usmilitary.about.com/od/punitivearticles/a/mcm91.htm

"(2) willfully disobeys the lawful order of a warrant officer, noncommissioned officer, or petty officer;"


Let's reverse that scenario then. A Brigadier General from another post comes to my post where a private who is obviously not in his chain of command tells him to kick rocks when told something. The general just has to suck it up? It would be an interesting military social experiment as long as I'm not the unfortunate private.
 
2012-04-26 12:52:57 AM  

Zizzowop: I still don't understand what the limits to speech were, he posted his rants didn't he?


He disrespected a superior (the Commander in Chief).
 
2012-04-26 12:55:23 AM  

blacksharpiemarker: NOT NEWS: Soldiers with a brain realizes that blindly taking orders doesn't always mean serving in the best interests of his country, is punished to serve as an example to others who might like to get bright ideas. OBEY.


NEWS: Soldiers do not get to decide what is in the best interests of their country. They are just required to OBEY.

Oh wait, that's not news. Every farking moron on the planet knows that. Well, except you, of course.
 
2012-04-26 12:55:28 AM  
I'm not a fan of Bush, but let's say he was a Bush hater on active duty taking the same stupid actions about Bush in his blog -- I'd say him kick him out just the same. Basically, don't pull stupid shiat on active duty.
 
2012-04-26 12:56:52 AM  
What about other commissioned officers, like a NOAA Commissioned Corps Commander (O-5) or Captain (O-6).
Would a Navy enlisted guy salute them in a port if they ran into each other outdoors on the docks?

Always wondered how it worked with NOAA and the PHS having commissioned officers of the US with military rank.
 
2012-04-26 12:57:52 AM  

9beers: "Screw Obama and I will not follow all orders from him."

That's a pretty weak reason for taking a soldiers career away. Some extra duty, restrictions or maybe an Article 15 would have been more appropriate.


He had already been warned. He persisted in the actions. How long do you let this happen before you fire the guy?
 
2012-04-26 12:58:17 AM  
Don't people who sign up for the military read the contract?

You and your body become the property of the government, and they can do whatever they want with it. You sign away all your rights as a civilian.
 
2012-04-26 12:59:20 AM  
Anybody higher ranking that you can tell you what to do whenever they want as long as it's a lawful order. The reason they don't is because most officers aren't out there power tripping. The few that might want to are smart enough to realize that there's always somebody who outranks them.

I was in charge of a detail one time putting up tents for an event. I was a SSG in charge of a bunch of privates who got assigned to a post detail. My directions were that all the tents had to be up before the detail was dismissed. Being a bunch of lazy asses, they were screwing around, having been told by somebody that the detail would end at a certain time.

When that time came, they all started complaining and telling me that they had to go. Of course I refused and kept them working. About an hour later, a SFC comes and tells me that he's taking his soldiers back because they have other duties to take care of. I explained that the detail wasn't finished and that they couldn't be released. He pulled rank and took them anyways.

I called the officer of the day who called the battalion commander who called somebody else and within an hour, I had my detail back. They stayed until the detail was done and I never saw that SFC again.

Never pull rank because there's always somebody out there to put you in your place.
 
2012-04-26 12:59:50 AM  

9beers: "Screw Obama and I will not follow all orders from him."

That's a pretty weak reason for taking a soldiers career away. Some extra duty, restrictions or maybe an Article 15 would have been more appropriate.


content7.flixster.com

Just give him a few lashes and let him move on...
 
2012-04-26 01:00:09 AM  

Mixolydian Master: redhook: Mixolydian Master: redhook: Mixolydian Master: foo monkey: This guy was enlisted. He's not allowed to decide if an order is legal or not. Only officers can do that.

Nope, not true. If you are an enlisted private and some colonel walks up to you and tells you to go into some village and start mowing down civilians, you can refuse it as unlawful. Another interesting military fact I learned in Basic training: If you are enlisted, even a private, but are a combat MOS and you are with an officer who is a non combat MOS, you are in charge, even if he/she's a general. I mean, good luck ever finding yourself in that scenario, but it's true. I wouldn't have a clue how to google that to back it up, but it was in one of the many boring classroom lessons on military law you go through.

You cannot back that up, it is not a true statement. That officer cannot give you orders if they are not in your chain of command.

Dude, what?1 I was in the Army for 5 years. I worked in Landstuhl, Germany hospital. There were many many many many many officers that were not in my chain of command. If I didn't do what they said, you would find yourself in the front leaning rest position. All officers are over the enlisted, even separate branches. Scenario: A private goes to another military post to pick up some supplies. A Lt Colonel gives him an order. He tells him to fark off cause he's not in his chain of command. You think he'd say "my bad, carry on."

Someone misinformed you

If a private goes to another post he falls under that posts chain of command while there. And disrespecting a superior commissioned officer is a violation of Article 89 of the UCMJ. Article 91 comes close to backing you up but still no cigar.

http://usmilitary.about.com/od/punitivearticles/a/mcm91.htm

"(2) willfully disobeys the lawful order of a warrant officer, noncommissioned officer, or petty officer;"

Let's reverse that scenario then. A Brigadier General from another post comes to my post where a pri ...


Still covered.

http://usmilitary.about.com/od/punitivearticles/a/mcm90_2.htm

(ii) Authority of issuing officer. The commissioned officer issuing the order must have authority to give such an order. Authorization may be based on law, regulation, or custom of the service.

I'm sure I don't need to explain to you how orders are relayed according to military custom. They go down the chain of command, i.e. from your direct superior officer (your boss) to the next in command. I dunno how things were when you were in but bypassing the chain can get you court-martialed. At the very least it'll get you in all kinds of other trouble.
 
2012-04-26 01:00:15 AM  

9beers: "Screw Obama and I will not follow all orders from him."

That's a pretty weak reason for taking a soldiers career away. Some extra duty, restrictions or maybe an Article 15 would have been more appropriate.


Bzzzt.
Nope: That kind of shiat is extremely prejudicial to good order.
The NCO was ordered to stop.
Repeatedly.

/You can't expect to take a career-limiting dump like that in uniform in public without attracting negative attention.
 
2012-04-26 01:01:40 AM  

404 page not found: rikkidoxx: You do not diss those of a rank higher than you and you do not diss the commander in chief no matter who he or she is.

Don't you libtards ever get tired of censoring protected political free speech? I bet you even supported LT Watada, didn't you? DIDN'T YOU?


Nope. Watada should be in jail, too.
 
2012-04-26 01:01:47 AM  

dantanner: He actually said he would not obey the orders of the Commander in Chief. But he took an oath to protect and defend the Constitution.


The United States Armed Forces oath of enlistment explicitly reads: "...and that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States..."
 
2012-04-26 01:03:24 AM  

foo monkey: This guy was enlisted. He's not allowed to decide if an order is legal or not. Only officers can do that.


Uh... as an enlisted man, I don't recall being trained on "legal" orders.

What I DO recall being trained on was LAWFUL orders. We were under no obligation to follow UNLAWFUL orders. We were expected to be able to discern the difference despite our lack of law degrees or commissions.

So I don't know where you get the idea that only commissioned officers can decide the legality of an order, but please tell me more about how the military works. I must not have been paying attention.
 
2012-04-26 01:04:54 AM  

Ronnie_Zman: dantanner: He actually said he would not obey the orders of the Commander in Chief. But he took an oath to protect and defend the Constitution.

The United States Armed Forces oath of enlistment explicitly reads: "...and that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States..."


But what if the President can't prove he's a natural-born citizen of the United States of America?
 
2012-04-26 01:06:20 AM  

redhook: Mixolydian Master: redhook: Mixolydian Master: redhook: Mixolydian Master: foo monkey: This guy was enlisted. He's not allowed to decide if an order is legal or not. Only officers can do that.

Nope, not true. If you are an enlisted private and some colonel walks up to you and tells you to go into some village and start mowing down civilians, you can refuse it as unlawful. Another interesting military fact I learned in Basic training: If you are enlisted, even a private, but are a combat MOS and you are with an officer who is a non combat MOS, you are in charge, even if he/she's a general. I mean, good luck ever finding yourself in that scenario, but it's true. I wouldn't have a clue how to google that to back it up, but it was in one of the many boring classroom lessons on military law you go through.

You cannot back that up, it is not a true statement. That officer cannot give you orders if they are not in your chain of command.

Dude, what?1 I was in the Army for 5 years. I worked in Landstuhl, Germany hospital. There were many many many many many officers that were not in my chain of command. If I didn't do what they said, you would find yourself in the front leaning rest position. All officers are over the enlisted, even separate branches. Scenario: A private goes to another military post to pick up some supplies. A Lt Colonel gives him an order. He tells him to fark off cause he's not in his chain of command. You think he'd say "my bad, carry on."

Someone misinformed you

If a private goes to another post he falls under that posts chain of command while there. And disrespecting a superior commissioned officer is a violation of Article 89 of the UCMJ. Article 91 comes close to backing you up but still no cigar.

http://usmilitary.about.com/od/punitivearticles/a/mcm91.htm

"(2) willfully disobeys the lawful order of a warrant officer, noncommissioned officer, or petty officer;"

I'm sure I don't need to explain to you how orders are relayed according to military custom. They go down the chain of command, i.e. from your direct superior officer (your boss) to the next in command. I dunno how things were when you were in but bypassing the chain can get you court-martialed. At the very least it'll get you in all kinds of other trouble..


Like most things in life there is the letter of the law, and the spirit of the law. A colonel outside of my chain of command, you listen to when spoken to. You get huffy, he'll demand to know who your superior is. He'll have a talk with them about my insubordination, and you can guarantee I'll be in a world of shiat. If you see something that looks like this

t1.gstatic.com

on someone's shoulders. You don't read them the riot act when they tell you something, cause they 'aint in your chain of command'.
 
2012-04-26 01:07:27 AM  

holdeestrufs: What I DO recall being trained on was LAWFUL orders. We were under no obligation to follow UNLAWFUL orders. We were expected to be able to discern the difference despite our lack of law degrees or commissions.


So what unlawful orders has Obama forced upon the military? Dude was just a partisan hack and an idiot.
 
2012-04-26 01:10:01 AM  
This is exactly how it should be in the military.
 
2012-04-26 01:11:07 AM  

Mixolydian Master: foo monkey: This guy was enlisted. He's not allowed to decide if an order is legal or not. Only officers can do that.

Nope, not true. If you are an enlisted private and some colonel walks up to you and tells you to go into some village and start mowing down civilians, you can refuse it as unlawful. Another interesting military fact I learned in Basic training: If you are enlisted, even a private, but are a combat MOS and you are with an officer who is a non combat MOS, you are in charge, even if he/she's a general. I mean, good luck ever finding yourself in that scenario, but it's true. I wouldn't have a clue how to google that to back it up, but it was in one of the many boring classroom lessons on military law you go through.


They call that "situational authority." It's what allows the infantry corporal to tell the captain journalist to "go over there so you don't get shot." And that is only going to apply in combat. If you tried that in the mess hall, you'd get laughed at.
 
2012-04-26 01:13:02 AM  
*raises right hand*

/Again.
 
2012-04-26 01:13:05 AM  
UCMJ Art. 134
"Though not specifically mentioned in this chapter, all disorders and neglects to the prejudice of good order and discipline in the armed forces, all conduct of a nature to bring discredit upon the armed forces, and crimes and offenses not capital, of which persons subject to this chapter may be guilty, shall be taken cognizance of by a general, special, or summary court-martial, according to the nature and degree of the offense, and shall be punished at the discretion of that court."

TLDR: "Anything we do not like is against the law."
 
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