If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Comics Alliance)   Six more Alan Moore projects DC can exploit   (comicsalliance.com) divider line 51
    More: Amusing, security guards, J. Michael Straczynski, stand-up comedy, Commissioner Gordon, swans, Judd Winick, comics, screens  
•       •       •

3850 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 25 Apr 2012 at 12:20 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



51 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-04-25 12:21:53 PM
Hurm.
 
2012-04-25 12:35:04 PM
I'd be interested in V2. Evey has a lot of work to do.
 
2012-04-25 12:49:00 PM
Little do you realize, that article was actually paid placement. DC is working on all of those titles, but they're willing to nix the ones that the fanboys actually think might be a good idea, since fanboys don't buy anything.
 
2012-04-25 12:51:31 PM
First off, Top Ten continued publication without Moore and got shiatty and League of Extraordinary Gentlemen is continuing WITH Moore.

So those two don't really fit. That being said they've been majorly cribbing his shiat for Green Lantern [Blackest Night and etc] and Swamp Thing.
 
2012-04-25 12:54:29 PM
Before Watchmen is worth it just to see people lose their shiat. The fact that other people were able to use some of those examples of Moore's work to create interesting stories, or Moore using other authors characters to create some of those examples, seems lost to the author of the article.
 
2012-04-25 12:58:27 PM
Wake me up when they start talking about "The Lost Girls".
 
2012-04-25 12:59:29 PM

dr.zaeus: Wake me up when they start talking about "The Lost Girls".


Properly cast, that would make a good Skinemax movie.
 
2012-04-25 01:03:53 PM
If Alan Moore took a shiat in a paper bag and left it on the doorstep of DC Comics, Geoff Johns would piss on it, smear it on an art board, and print it.
 
2012-04-25 01:07:19 PM

Fano: dr.zaeus: Wake me up when they start talking about "The Lost Girls".

Properly cast, that would make a good Skinemax movie.


properly cast, it would get a lot of people arrested
 
2012-04-25 01:07:24 PM

FirstNationalBastard: If Alan Moore took a shiat in a paper bag and left it on the doorstep of DC Comics, Geoff Johns would piss on it, smear it on an art board, and print it.


I'm sure Moore took many highly profitable shiats while at DC. What did DC do? Flush them away. What a waste.
 
2012-04-25 01:21:33 PM

SpoilerAlert: or Moore using other authors characters to create some of those examples


There's a huge difference between blowing the dust off a bunch of old IP that's been languishing in the basement, revitalizing it and giving it new life, and taking something that's already popular and just making more of it.

They're both obvious cash-ins, but the former case requires an actual spark of creativity and inventiveness. I'm not really much of an Alan Moore fan (For every LoEG we get a Promethea), and I think "Watchmen" is incredibly overrated. But I also think that the Watchmen story is complete in-and-of-itself. Everything that needed to be known about those characters is already known. Hell, most of the story is driven by flashbacks. So "Watchmen" already covered everything that "Before Watchmen" could reasonably cover.
 
2012-04-25 01:29:36 PM

dr.zaeus: Wake me up when they start talking about "The Lost Girls".


media.tumblr.com
 
2012-04-25 01:31:30 PM
That was very blah.

And is it just more, or does Moore look more and more (pun intended) like Rasputin every year?

www.worsleyschool.net

/he could say he's a relative, and claim to have the same 15" dong like his great grandfather.
 
2012-04-25 01:54:04 PM

t3knomanser: SpoilerAlert: or Moore using other authors characters to create some of those examples

There's a huge difference between blowing the dust off a bunch of old IP that's been languishing in the basement, revitalizing it and giving it new life, and taking something that's already popular and just making more of it.

They're both obvious cash-ins, but the former case requires an actual spark of creativity and inventiveness. I'm not really much of an Alan Moore fan (For every LoEG we get a Promethea), and I think "Watchmen" is incredibly overrated. But I also think that the Watchmen story is complete in-and-of-itself. Everything that needed to be known about those characters is already known. Hell, most of the story is driven by flashbacks. So "Watchmen" already covered everything that "Before Watchmen" could reasonably cover.


Watchmen was brought into the public eye by the movie, but it's an old IP that has otherwise been gathering dust. Swamp Thing was revitalized in less time, same with dozens of other IPs.

Watchmen as a story can still be viewed as complete with the addition of Before Watchmen. Prequels, spin-off, side stories, etc can be considered additional material that should not effect the completeness of the original plot.

Even if there's nothing left to be known about the characters, you can use already developed characters and use them to tell a story. If it ends up being just a mindless comic, it will either fail, or succeed despite this by people who probably thought Watchmen were a bunch of bad-ass superheros.

I don't like the Star Wars prequels, but they don't effect my enjoyment of the original trilogy so I ignore that they exist.
 
2012-04-25 02:01:30 PM

SpoilerAlert: Watchmen was brought into the public eye by the movie, but it's an old IP that has otherwise been gathering dus


It entered pop-culture due to the movie, but the comic book has done a steady long-tail trade and is still widely read. It's hardly moldering, forgotten in some archive somewhere. Or, to put it another way: if it's popular enough to be turned into a movie, it's pretty hard to argue that it's a forgotten property that's gathering dust.

SpoilerAlert: I don't like the Star Wars prequels, but they don't effect my enjoyment of the original trilogy so I ignore that they exist.


But like the Star Wars prequels- this is an incredible waste of time and money that could have been invested into something that wasn't an obvious attempt to cash in on a popular brand. Call me daft, but I like to see actual creative endeavors from time to time.
 
2012-04-25 02:21:07 PM

t3knomanser: It entered pop-culture due to the movie, but the comic book has done a steady long-tail trade and is still widely read. It's hardly moldering, forgotten in some archive somewhere. Or, to put it another way: if it's popular enough to be turned into a movie, it's pretty hard to argue that it's a forgotten property that's gathering dust


Eh, I still think 25 years for a before exploiting the license isn't exactly a case of jumping the gun to start doing new things with it. In a couple of years if they start taking The Sandman characters and having them do slapstick comedy or something, maybe I'd feel otherwise.

t3knomanser: But like the Star Wars prequels- this is an incredible waste of time and money that could have been invested into something that wasn't an obvious attempt to cash in on a popular brand. Call me daft, but I like to see actual creative endeavors from time to time


That's assuming with the time and money the same people would be making an actual original creative creative endeavor instead of just using a different IP, along with the presumption that there's no way they could do something good with the material. If you like actual creative endeavors, by all means, support them. But if they weren't making this, it's not like that money would've gone towards a bunch of new IPs.
 
2012-04-25 02:21:53 PM

PonceAlyosha: League of Extraordinary Gentlemen


Having a CAR CHASE in VENICE was inspired screenwriting.
 
2012-04-25 02:47:28 PM

t3knomanser: SpoilerAlert: Watchmen was brought into the public eye by the movie, but it's an old IP that has otherwise been gathering dus

It entered pop-culture due to the movie, but the comic book has done a steady long-tail trade and is still widely read. It's hardly moldering, forgotten in some archive somewhere. Or, to put it another way: if it's popular enough to be turned into a movie, it's pretty hard to argue that it's a forgotten property that's gathering dust.



Interesting. So would you say that DC's decision to keep Watchmen in print is a legitimate business move since it's "still widely read" and Moore should put on his big boy pants and quit whining about the contract that he signed back in the day?

That came out a little snarkier than I intended. Rough day and all.
 
2012-04-25 03:20:31 PM
Seriously. Comics Alliance can just SHUT UP about poor Alan Moore being exploited.

He made Watchmen by using characters created by Steve Ditko, Stan Lee, and Jack Kirby (among others) and slightly tweaking them. They were all Charlton Comics and early Marvel Comics characters with different names and costumes. Everyone involved admitted as much.

He made Lost Girls and The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen by using characters created by Bram Stoker, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Lewis Carroll, Mark Twain, and a dozen other writers.

So for Comics Alliance (and Alan Moore) to whine about the Watchmen being written by someone other than Alan Moore is just hypocritical and shameless. All Alan Moore ever does is write other people's characters.

Does he tell good stories? Hell yes. But in the comics world, the whole POINT is to write for characters created by someone else most of the time.... And Watchmen is no different.

Furthermore, where would we be if we decided only the creator was allowed to write comic characters? Where would we be if the only Batman stories ever written were by Bob Kane? The only Spider-Man stories by Stan Lee?

I read comics because I want to read good stories. If the guys writing Watchmen write good stories, I'll be there to read them. If the stories suck, I'll wait to see if someone else does better. Either way, this is not "raping" Alan Moore, because he already did plenty of raping and pillaging to get where he is.

/I won't even go into how stupid he was about his contract.
 
2012-04-25 04:01:40 PM
Never read the book, but saw V for Vendetta (the movie) again recently. I'd forgotten how brilliant that was.
 
2012-04-25 04:20:19 PM
I always liked that band.
 
2012-04-25 04:21:53 PM
honestly i want to see an adaptation of all star superman.

that was, without a doubt, one of the best comics DC has ever done.

and moore wasn't involved at all.
 
2012-04-25 04:27:31 PM

ZeroCorpse: Seriously. Comics Alliance can just SHUT UP about poor Alan Moore being exploited.

He made Watchmen by using characters created by Steve Ditko, Stan Lee, and Jack Kirby (among others) and slightly tweaking them. They were all Charlton Comics and early Marvel Comics characters with different names and costumes. Everyone involved admitted as much.

He made Lost Girls and The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen by using characters created by Bram Stoker, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Lewis Carroll, Mark Twain, and a dozen other writers.

So for Comics Alliance (and Alan Moore) to whine about the Watchmen being written by someone other than Alan Moore is just hypocritical and shameless. All Alan Moore ever does is write other people's characters.

Does he tell good stories? Hell yes. But in the comics world, the whole POINT is to write for characters created by someone else most of the time.... And Watchmen is no different.

Furthermore, where would we be if we decided only the creator was allowed to write comic characters? Where would we be if the only Batman stories ever written were by Bob Kane? The only Spider-Man stories by Stan Lee?

I read comics because I want to read good stories. If the guys writing Watchmen write good stories, I'll be there to read them. If the stories suck, I'll wait to see if someone else does better. Either way, this is not "raping" Alan Moore, because he already did plenty of raping and pillaging to get where he is.

/I won't even go into how stupid he was about his contract.


I totally agree with this and I have a hard time feeling any sympathy for Moore. I mean not only was Moore himself made famous thanks do the stories he told about other people's characters but Watchmen was created in the 1980s. If Moore didn't realize he was selling these characters to DC and at that point they could (and would) do anything they want with them then he is an idiot. I mean this isn't Siegel and Shuster during the depression selling their characters for a steak dinner, I am sure Moore was paid handsomly for the Watchmen stores he wrote and shouldn't have ever expected they would be put in some kind of hypothetical display case where no one would ever touch them again.
 
2012-04-25 05:01:33 PM

lamecomedian: So would you say that DC's decision to keep Watchmen in print is a legitimate business move since it's "still widely read" and Moore should put on his big boy pants and quit whining about the contract that he signed back in the day?


Yes.
 
2012-04-25 05:05:59 PM

Wookie Milson: I always liked that band.


Silly rabbit, you're thinking of the Alan Rickman project.
 
2012-04-25 05:09:15 PM

SpoilerAlert: t3knomanser: It entered pop-culture due to the movie, but the comic book has done a steady long-tail trade and is still widely read. It's hardly moldering, forgotten in some archive somewhere. Or, to put it another way: if it's popular enough to be turned into a movie, it's pretty hard to argue that it's a forgotten property that's gathering dust

Eh, I still think 25 years for a before exploiting the license isn't exactly a case of jumping the gun to start doing new things with it. In a couple of years if they start taking The Sandman characters and having them do slapstick comedy or something, maybe I'd feel otherwise.

t3knomanser: But like the Star Wars prequels- this is an incredible waste of time and money that could have been invested into something that wasn't an obvious attempt to cash in on a popular brand. Call me daft, but I like to see actual creative endeavors from time to time

That's assuming with the time and money the same people would be making an actual original creative creative endeavor instead of just using a different IP, along with the presumption that there's no way they could do something good with the material. If you like actual creative endeavors, by all means, support them. But if they weren't making this, it's not like that money would've gone towards a bunch of new IPs.


No that would be awsome. Death and Delerium meets the three stooges.
 
2012-04-25 05:18:40 PM
All i know is that the last couple of LXG installments have been....well.....just terrible.
 
2012-04-25 05:39:25 PM

Slaves2Darkness: No that would be awsome. Death and Delerium meets the three stooges.


That already happened.

Hebalo: All i know is that the last couple of LXG installments have been....well.....just terrible.


Really? I liked the second volume the best, with the Martians, but I have really enjoyed the rest of the series. Except Volume 3, I get it you, listened to Gilbert and Sullivan. God.
 
2012-04-25 05:42:15 PM

t3knomanser: SpoilerAlert: or Moore using other authors characters to create some of those examples

There's a huge difference between blowing the dust off a bunch of old IP that's been languishing in the basement, revitalizing it and giving it new life, and taking something that's already popular and just making more of it.

They're both obvious cash-ins, but the former case requires an actual spark of creativity and inventiveness. I'm not really much of an Alan Moore fan (For every LoEG we get a Promethea), and I think "Watchmen" is incredibly overrated. But I also think that the Watchmen story is complete in-and-of-itself. Everything that needed to be known about those characters is already known. Hell, most of the story is driven by flashbacks. So "Watchmen" already covered everything that "Before Watchmen" could reasonably cover.


You, sirrah, are dead to me.

The characters in the Watchmen are comics archetypes, and the story is deliberately contorted to explore how comics treat time and space. Take the book "Fearful Symmetry": That part of the story is told that way deliberately to allow the pages, layout, and even the panels to be symmetrical. The whole character of Dr. Manhattan was to emphasize the fact that comics can be constructed as meticulously as a time-piece.

I mean, it's a goddamned pity that people are so distracted by the story that they ignore the message that the artists (Moore, Gibbons - for some reason people forget about Gibbons) have printed on the page in gigantic bold letters.

That's incidentally why the story in the film is better, because it can dispense with the contortions of being a metaphor for comic. Unfortunately that purely narrative translation also means that so none of the other elements of the comic make sense despite sometimes being an exact match for a panel in the comic.

That's why the Watchmen is the foremost piece of comics art, because it manages to both be about comics, and a particular story. Moore is a genius for managing to fit a narrative mask over the other elements. And he's right to complain about how his works are devalued by their surface details being co-opted to make crappy knock-offs with none of the artistic merit inherent in the original.

It's not that he came up with the characters, or that the concepts he explored were even original, but that he managed to fit the two together to make a statement about the power of the comics medium that shows as much (if not more) than it tells.
 
2012-04-25 05:44:24 PM

PonceAlyosha: Slaves2Darkness: No that would be awsome. Death and Delerium meets the three stooges.

That already happened.

Hebalo: All i know is that the last couple of LXG installments have been....well.....just terrible.

Really? I liked the second volume the best, with the Martians, but I have really enjoyed the rest of the series. Except Volume 3, I get it you, listened to Gilbert and Sullivan. God.


martians were fine. It's the crappy "Century" volumes. Just terrible.
 
2012-04-25 05:47:43 PM

lamecomedian: t3knomanser: SpoilerAlert: Watchmen was brought into the public eye by the movie, but it's an old IP that has otherwise been gathering dus

It entered pop-culture due to the movie, but the comic book has done a steady long-tail trade and is still widely read. It's hardly moldering, forgotten in some archive somewhere. Or, to put it another way: if it's popular enough to be turned into a movie, it's pretty hard to argue that it's a forgotten property that's gathering dust.



Interesting. So would you say that DC's decision to keep Watchmen in print is a legitimate business move since it's "still widely read" and Moore should put on his big boy pants and quit whining about the contract that he signed back in the day?

That came out a little snarkier than I intended. Rough day and all.


I love reading comics but until the movie came out. I never heard of Watchmen. After the movie, I have been wanting to read it. So that can say that the movie helped the Watchmen comic grow in popularity.
 
2012-04-25 06:16:42 PM

ZeroCorpse: Seriously. Comics Alliance can just SHUT UP about poor Alan Moore being exploited...


FINALLY A VOICE OF REASON!

Moore signed the contract and he cashed the checks, so he needs to STFU. biatching about other people using "your characters" (HAH!), while making money off other people's creations is hyper-hypocritical.
"WAHH! Don't buy 'Before Watchmen'! Buy the porno I wrote using the properties of Grimm, Barrie and Carrol instead!"

It's amazing that nobody outside of DC's offices has actually READ the finished product, yet have already decided that it sucks.
 
2012-04-25 06:24:57 PM

Fano: dr.zaeus: Wake me up when they start talking about "The Lost Girls".

Properly cast, that would make a good Skinemax movie.


blog.zap2it.com

?


PonceAlyosha: Hebalo: All i know is that the last couple of LXG installments have been....well.....just terrible.

Really? I liked the second volume the best, with the Martians, but I have really enjoyed the rest of the series. Except Volume 3, I get it you, listened to Gilbert and Sullivan. God.


First two were great. Second two, not so much, imo. Let's hope the 80s version is better.

actualplay.roleplayingpublicradio.com
 
2012-04-25 06:32:06 PM

PonceAlyosha: Hebalo: All i know is that the last couple of LXG installments have been....well.....just terrible.

Really? I liked the second volume the best, with the Martians, but I have really enjoyed the rest of the series. Except Volume 3, I get it you, listened to Gilbert and Sullivan. God.



Brecht's 'Threepenny Opera', not Gilbert and Sullivan. But yeah, LOEG has been pretty shiat since the awesomeness of Hyde and Nemo was replaced by the most tedious ménage à trois imaginable.

I love Alan Moore and I get it that he might have a few personal issues he's working through, but I hope that the next League is based around something more interesting than Alan, Mina and Orlando's relationship (and if it includes yet another scene where Ian Sinclair turns up to basically tell the characters how to progress the plot, like a badly run game of D&D, I will book a train ticket to Northampton and kick him in the nuts for wasting mine and Kev O'Neil's time).

FTA - thoroughly explored through, oh, about twenty-three years of stories about how these particular events affected Batman, Commissioner Gordon, Barbara Gordon, and pretty much everyone else involved except those two freaky little twins who drag the Commissioner into the funhouse.


I'm pretty sure the freaky twins turned up again during Batman & Son.
 
2012-04-25 06:45:53 PM

fusillade762:
First two were great. Second two, not so much, imo. Let's hope the 80s version is better.

[actualplay.roleplayingpublicradio.com image 584x330]


The 80's version looks awesome, except BA Baracas is about six inches too tall and Doc Brown is about three inches too short.

/Yes, it matters.
 
2012-04-25 07:47:47 PM

lamecomedian: Interesting. So would you say that DC's decision to keep Watchmen in print is a legitimate business move since it's "still widely read" and Moore should put on his big boy pants and quit whining about the contract that he signed back in the day?


www.jamesjoyce.co.uk
 
2012-04-25 09:07:07 PM
While not the big Hollywood adaptation, "For The Man Who Has Everything" has been done by the DCAU Justice League.
Part I
Link

Part II
Link
Pointless trivia time, it's the ONLY adaptation of his work that Alan Moore actually likes. And it is indeed epic.
 
2012-04-25 09:12:28 PM
I forgot how much I enjoyed those last Alan Moore Superman issues. I think I pretty much gave up comic books for good soon after.

Where did you go 1986 with your promises of a bright and shiny future and romeo void?

where? and how did i get so farkin' old?!?!?!?
 
2012-04-25 09:42:45 PM

Homertron: While not the big Hollywood adaptation, "For The Man Who Has Everything" has been done by the DCAU Justice League.
Part I
Link

Part II
Link
Pointless trivia time, it's the ONLY adaptation of his work that Alan Moore actually likes. And it is indeed epic.


Superman was never interesting to me until the DCAU, both S:AS and JL. And that episode demonstrates part of what Superman is all about. Power and responsibility.
 
2012-04-25 09:56:17 PM

Fano: Homertron: While not the big Hollywood adaptation, "For The Man Who Has Everything" has been done by the DCAU Justice League.
Part I
Link

Part II
Link
Pointless trivia time, it's the ONLY adaptation of his work that Alan Moore actually likes. And it is indeed epic.

Superman was never interesting to me until the DCAU, both S:AS and JL. And that episode demonstrates part of what Superman is all about. Power and responsibility.


He's even interesting on Young Justice. Hell, I've come to really appreciate Superboy on that show, too, and I was never a fan of any incarnation of Superboy.

But then, Young Justice is one of the best animated superhero shows ever made. It's just fantastic in terms of plot, voice acting, story arcs, mysteries, reveals, and making DC characters from Earth 16 more interesting than their Earth 1 / Earth 2 counterparts.

If only Marvel would treat Spider-Man the way DC treats their characters. What they've done with Ultimate Spider-Man on TV is a crime. I can only hope that when he turns up in Avengers: Earth's Mightiest Heroes, that he'll be a little more true to the character and less awful than the USM version.
 
2012-04-25 11:33:08 PM

ZeroCorpse: Fano: Homertron: While not the big Hollywood adaptation, "For The Man Who Has Everything" has been done by the DCAU Justice League.
Part I
Link

Part II
Link
Pointless trivia time, it's the ONLY adaptation of his work that Alan Moore actually likes. And it is indeed epic.

Superman was never interesting to me until the DCAU, both S:AS and JL. And that episode demonstrates part of what Superman is all about. Power and responsibility.

He's even interesting on Young Justice. Hell, I've come to really appreciate Superboy on that show, too, and I was never a fan of any incarnation of Superboy.

But then, Young Justice is one of the best animated superhero shows ever made. It's just fantastic in terms of plot, voice acting, story arcs, mysteries, reveals, and making DC characters from Earth 16 more interesting than their Earth 1 / Earth 2 counterparts.

If only Marvel would treat Spider-Man the way DC treats their characters. What they've done with Ultimate Spider-Man on TV is a crime. I can only hope that when he turns up in Avengers: Earth's Mightiest Heroes, that he'll be a little more true to the character and less awful than the USM version.


Please gods no. I specifically love that cartoon because it's actually about the Avengers and not the Marvel Superfriends that Bendis concocted.
 
2012-04-26 01:44:27 AM
I've read Watchman and The Killing Joke, what other works by Moore would you recommend?
 
2012-04-26 08:15:24 AM

Hebalo: PonceAlyosha: Slaves2Darkness: No that would be awsome. Death and Delerium meets the three stooges.

That already happened.

Hebalo: All i know is that the last couple of LXG installments have been....well.....just terrible.

Really? I liked the second volume the best, with the Martians, but I have really enjoyed the rest of the series. Except Volume 3, I get it you, listened to Gilbert and Sullivan. God.

martians were fine. It's the crappy "Century" volumes. Just terrible.


I never read the Century series, but I did read The Black Dossier. I live in Canada and I had to order it through Amazon USA since some of the characters were still under copyright in Canada so it wasn't allowed to be sold here. I was pretty bored with it and wasn't able to finish it. It really seemed like Moore trying to show off what he could do rather than write a cool LoEG story. It's like "wow Alan Moore, you can write a fake Shakespeare story or a fake Jack Kerouac story, good for you".

Also after reading the article I think it would be hilarious if someone would write a comic story staring Mina, Hyde, Quartermain, Nemo and the invisible man. Like the article said they are all public domain characters so I am guessing as long as they didn't violate any of his trademarks (like by calling them the league) he couldn't do anything to stop it. I think DC should do it just to see how pissed of Alan Moore would get, and I would buy a copy of the story just for that reason.
 
2012-04-26 10:17:25 AM

Hebalo: All i know is that the last couple of LXG installments have been....well.....just terrible.


for some reason i keep buying them
 
2012-04-26 10:18:08 AM

4NSpy: I've read Watchman and The Killing Joke, what other works by Moore would you recommend?


From Hell, V for Vendetta, League of Extraordinary Gentlemen 1 & 2
 
2012-04-26 10:44:23 AM

moothemagiccow: Hebalo: All i know is that the last couple of LXG installments have been....well.....just terrible.

for some reason i keep buying them


I know. No idea why. Keep hoping it'll get better, I guess.
 
2012-04-26 11:09:47 AM
Can't Alan Moore just eat a few more hearts and get over it?

/All Star Superman mostly made me laugh. I did like the pet sun eater.
 
2012-04-26 11:55:37 AM

Son of Streak: ZeroCorpse: Fano: Homertron: While not the big Hollywood adaptation, "For The Man Who Has Everything" has been done by the DCAU Justice League.
Part I
Link

Part II
Link
Pointless trivia time, it's the ONLY adaptation of his work that Alan Moore actually likes. And it is indeed epic.

Superman was never interesting to me until the DCAU, both S:AS and JL. And that episode demonstrates part of what Superman is all about. Power and responsibility.

He's even interesting on Young Justice. Hell, I've come to really appreciate Superboy on that show, too, and I was never a fan of any incarnation of Superboy.

But then, Young Justice is one of the best animated superhero shows ever made. It's just fantastic in terms of plot, voice acting, story arcs, mysteries, reveals, and making DC characters from Earth 16 more interesting than their Earth 1 / Earth 2 counterparts.

If only Marvel would treat Spider-Man the way DC treats their characters. What they've done with Ultimate Spider-Man on TV is a crime. I can only hope that when he turns up in Avengers: Earth's Mightiest Heroes, that he'll be a little more true to the character and less awful than the USM version.

Please gods no. I specifically love that cartoon because it's actually about the Avengers and not the Marvel Superfriends that Bendis concocted.


Here's a still from an upcoming episode:

i.imgur.com

So yes, he's there, along with the rest of the Marvel Universe.
 
2012-04-26 11:57:53 AM
One thing that confuses me about that picture: In A:EMH Pym is Ant Man/Giant Man. We see Ant Man in the pic... And we also see Yellowjacket.

Maybe Lang is Yellowjacket? I don't know. This really doesn't make sense.
 
2012-04-26 09:33:39 PM

ZeroCorpse: Son of Streak: ZeroCorpse: Fano: Homertron: While not the big Hollywood adaptation, "For The Man Who Has Everything" has been done by the DCAU Justice League.
Part I
Link

Part II
Link
Pointless trivia time, it's the ONLY adaptation of his work that Alan Moore actually likes. And it is indeed epic.

Superman was never interesting to me until the DCAU, both S:AS and JL. And that episode demonstrates part of what Superman is all about. Power and responsibility.

He's even interesting on Young Justice. Hell, I've come to really appreciate Superboy on that show, too, and I was never a fan of any incarnation of Superboy.

But then, Young Justice is one of the best animated superhero shows ever made. It's just fantastic in terms of plot, voice acting, story arcs, mysteries, reveals, and making DC characters from Earth 16 more interesting than their Earth 1 / Earth 2 counterparts.

If only Marvel would treat Spider-Man the way DC treats their characters. What they've done with Ultimate Spider-Man on TV is a crime. I can only hope that when he turns up in Avengers: Earth's Mightiest Heroes, that he'll be a little more true to the character and less awful than the USM version.

Please gods no. I specifically love that cartoon because it's actually about the Avengers and not the Marvel Superfriends that Bendis concocted.

Here's a still from an upcoming episode:

[i.imgur.com image 640x360]

So yes, he's there, along with the rest of the Marvel Universe.


Well that's just farkin' lovely. Now I'm all stabbity.
 
Displayed 50 of 51 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report