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(WRCB)   Side effect of all those foreclosed and abandoned homes? Millions and millions of hungry, blood-sucking parasites. And along with bankers, there are a lot of mosquitoes, too   (wrcbtv.com) divider line 51
    More: Scary, West Nile virus, side effects, cultural center  
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5834 clicks; posted to Main » on 25 Apr 2012 at 11:24 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-04-25 11:26:07 AM  
This seems like a problem that could be solved with a couple hundred dollars of Clorox.

And some DEET for the mosquitoes.
 
2012-04-25 11:26:52 AM  
AverageAmericanGuy: This seems like a problem that could be solved with a couple hundred dollars of CloroxZyklon B.

And some DEET for the mosquitoes.


FTFY
 
2012-04-25 11:27:31 AM  
It's pretty surreal to go golfing in the Atlanta area and just see neighborhoods full of empty homes or empty lots with a "future home of the ___________ family" sign and just a bunch of PVC pipe sticking up in an empty lot.
 
2012-04-25 11:29:12 AM  
Don't homeowners get fined over stuff like this?
 
2012-04-25 11:29:25 AM  
Well it's a good thing we keep building new houses to sell.
 
2012-04-25 11:30:53 AM  
affordablehousinginstitute.org

Maybe a mosquito version?
 
2012-04-25 11:31:01 AM  
Deploy the peacocks!
 
2012-04-25 11:31:18 AM  
At least the copper theives are making out.
 
2012-04-25 11:31:30 AM  
Build bat houses.
 
2012-04-25 11:33:02 AM  
What a country!
 
2012-04-25 11:33:56 AM  

Lone Stranger: [affordablehousinginstitute.org image 238x210]

Maybe a mosquito version?


Or convert the wal-marts into them.
 
2012-04-25 11:34:59 AM  

The Beatings Will Continue Until Morale Improves: At least the copper theives are making out.


Well, it is spring time.
 
2012-04-25 11:35:02 AM  

wellreadneck: Don't homeowners get fined over stuff like this?


Only when it's a person, not a bank. Corporations are only people when it comes time for free speech.
 
2012-04-25 11:37:07 AM  

Rootus: wellreadneck: Don't homeowners get fined over stuff like this?

Only when it's a person, not a bank. Corporations are only people when it comes time for free speech.


or donations.
 
2012-04-25 11:39:12 AM  
This is the result, when a Congress forces lending to those who can't repay it, then force government "fronts" to buy back that which they know to be worthless, at greatly inflated prices, making their campaign contributors wealthy. But by all means, don't vote out the incumbents.

\mortgage "crisis", nutshell
 
2012-04-25 11:39:28 AM  
Please drain your pools.
 
2012-04-25 11:43:06 AM  

StaleCoffee: Well it's a good thing we keep building new houses to sell.


Build Mortimer, build!
 
2012-04-25 11:44:25 AM  
Cheap & easy solution: regular old dish soap in the water,breaks the surface tension,larvae fall to the bottom & drown.
 
2012-04-25 11:45:44 AM  
And remember to spay or neuter your mosquitos.
 
2012-04-25 11:48:18 AM  
My neighbor in Georgia had this problem. Didn't want to take care of his pool and let it turn into a breeding ground. You couldn't go in my backyard for more than 5 minutes without getting eaten alive.

I bought a bucket of pool chlorine shock treatment tabs, climed on my roof, and chucked them over the fence into his pool.
 
2012-04-25 11:51:06 AM  

Frantic Freddie: Cheap & easy solution: regular old dish soap in the water,breaks the surface tension,larvae fall to the bottom & drown.


Like when they built the Panama canal, except they used oil.
 
2012-04-25 11:52:39 AM  
Suzanne, and her friends at the NAR really disapprove of this headline.
 
2012-04-25 11:53:36 AM  

Rootus: Only when it's a person, not a bank. Corporations are only people when it comes time for free speech.


Is it me or you just said that in Mitt Romney's voice?

/you skiped the "my firend" bit
 
2012-04-25 11:54:08 AM  

AverageAmericanGuy: This seems like a problem that could be solved with a couple hundred dollars of Clorox.

And some DEET for the mosquitoes.


And five seconds of "I give a rat's ass" by the actual owners of the properties. However, the banks & lenders didn't actually plan on owning these properties, or at least they didn't care what happened to them, so there are larger issues that just mosquitoes.

Local governments can't collect property taxes, enforce local laws related to property, and so on, because establishing clear title is near-impossible on quite a few of these places thanks to the huge mess that's been caused. This is just another consequence of having lots and lots of abandoned properties. I, personally, can't wait to see the vermin population explosion - not just mosquitoes, but rats, mice, bats, and so on - in states that depended on homeowners to manage those populations through habitation & ordinance.
 
2012-04-25 11:55:05 AM  

killiemary: And remember to spay or neuter your mosquitos.


I know just the man for the job....

jaymckinnon.com
 
2012-04-25 11:55:27 AM  

Rootus: wellreadneck: Don't homeowners get fined over stuff like this?

Only when it's a person, not a bank. Corporations are only people when it comes time for free speech.


In quite a few cases, corporations have told local goverments to suck it - "you can't prove we even own the house, so you'll have to take the time & money to pursue me through legal means." It's become a real mess for local governments.
 
2012-04-25 11:59:28 AM  

FormlessOne: And five seconds of "I give a rat's ass" by the actual owners of the properties. However, the banks & lenders didn't actually plan on owning these properties, or at least they didn't care what happened to them, so there are larger issues that just mosquitoes. Local governments can't collect property taxes, enforce local laws related to property, and so on, because establishing clear title is near-impossible on quite a few of these places thanks to the huge mess that's been caused. This is just another consequence of having lots and lots of abandoned properties. I, personally, can't wait to see the vermin population explosion - not just mosquitoes, but rats, mice, bats, and so on - in states that depended on homeowners to manage those populations through habitation & ordinance.


Bats are vermin?
 
GBB
2012-04-25 12:05:22 PM  

Mr. Breeze: My neighbor in Georgia had this problem. Didn't want to take care of his pool and let it turn into a breeding ground. You couldn't go in my backyard for more than 5 minutes without getting eaten alive.

I bought a bucket of pool chlorine shock treatment tabs, climed on my roof, and chucked them over the fence into his pool.


Ingenious.
t2.gstatic.com
So what did you do when that didn't work??

Chlorine doesn't kill mosquitoes.
 
2012-04-25 12:13:03 PM  

Bo Giggity: This is the result, when a Congress forces lending to those who can't repay it, then force government "fronts" to buy back that which they know to be worthless, at greatly inflated prices, making their campaign contributors wealthy. But by all means, don't vote out the incumbents.

\mortgage "crisis", nutshell


Troll like typing detected.
 
2012-04-25 12:13:27 PM  

FormlessOne: AverageAmericanGuy: This seems like a problem that could be solved with a couple hundred dollars of Clorox.

And some DEET for the mosquitoes.

And five seconds of "I give a rat's ass" by the actual owners of the properties. However, the banks & lenders didn't actually plan on owning these properties, or at least they didn't care what happened to them, so there are larger issues that just mosquitoes.

Local governments can't collect property taxes, enforce local laws related to property, and so on, because establishing clear title is near-impossible on quite a few of these places thanks to the huge mess that's been caused. This is just another consequence of having lots and lots of abandoned properties. I, personally, can't wait to see the vermin population explosion - not just mosquitoes, but rats, mice, bats, and so on - in states that depended on homeowners to manage those populations through habitation & ordinance.


My neighbor's house got used as a meth lab. It's a shiatty house on a shiatty piece of property to begin with. As the story goes, his wife got the place when they divorced. She sold it for cheap to some real estate agent in another state. He came and asked us what we were doing on his land, and we laughed and showed him to the actual piece of land he bought. He left all sad and depressed looking. He owed a guy some money and so gave him that piece of land. Now the title/deed/whatever is in limbo because apparently you can't give it away unless the new owner is willing to pay for the meth lab to be cleaned up which would cost more than the property of the land and shiatty house combined.

Meanwhile, two years ago, someone broke in and once in a while I see a deer or family of racoons hanging out in the open doorway.
 
2012-04-25 12:39:56 PM  

Hrist: FormlessOne: AverageAmericanGuy: This seems like a problem that could be solved with a couple hundred dollars of Clorox.

And some DEET for the mosquitoes.

And five seconds of "I give a rat's ass" by the actual owners of the properties. However, the banks & lenders didn't actually plan on owning these properties, or at least they didn't care what happened to them, so there are larger issues that just mosquitoes.

Local governments can't collect property taxes, enforce local laws related to property, and so on, because establishing clear title is near-impossible on quite a few of these places thanks to the huge mess that's been caused. This is just another consequence of having lots and lots of abandoned properties. I, personally, can't wait to see the vermin population explosion - not just mosquitoes, but rats, mice, bats, and so on - in states that depended on homeowners to manage those populations through habitation & ordinance.

My neighbor's house got used as a meth lab. It's a shiatty house on a shiatty piece of property to begin with. As the story goes, his wife got the place when they divorced. She sold it for cheap to some real estate agent in another state. He came and asked us what we were doing on his land, and we laughed and showed him to the actual piece of land he bought. He left all sad and depressed looking. He owed a guy some money and so gave him that piece of land. Now the title/deed/whatever is in limbo because apparently you can't give it away unless the new owner is willing to pay for the meth lab to be cleaned up which would cost more than the property of the land and shiatty house combined.

Meanwhile, two years ago, someone broke in and once in a while I see a deer or family of racoons hanging out in the open doorway.


I'm not advocating anything, of course, but I've heard that fire will clean up a property like that real quick.
 
2012-04-25 12:42:46 PM  
I really don't understand how it's in the banks interest to totally destroy their investment.

Taking ownership, and then renting it straight back to the occupants for a dollar a month would make them far more in the long run. These entire suburbs of ruins aren't helping anyone, monetarily or ethically.
 
2012-04-25 12:45:21 PM  

AverageAmericanGuy: This seems like a problem that could be solved with a couple hundred dollars of Clorox.


Chlorine gets used up fairly quick when tossed in a pool. It also gets expensive. Our local muni tosses fish into abandoned swimming pools and it takes care of the problem for longer and much cheaper.
 
2012-04-25 12:48:29 PM  

StaleCoffee: Well it's a good thing we keep building new houses to sell.


Around here there are very few resale houses available on the market right now. At least 4 out of 5 houses that I find on Redfin are already pending. New construction homes are selling as fast as they can build them.

/my house will be finished in 7 weeks, yay!
 
2012-04-25 12:50:41 PM  
Evil Mackerel

Frantic Freddie: Cheap & easy solution: regular old dish soap in the water,breaks the surface tension,larvae fall to the bottom & drown.

Like when they built the Panama canal, except they used oil


Works a little differently,oil creates a film they can't penetrate,but the end result of drowning the little bastards is the same. Also soap is biodegradable & if animals drink the water it's less likely to poison them.
 
2012-04-25 01:01:44 PM  
And see, this pisses me off. My boyfriend and I are responsible adults who could, if the right place came along, move into a house and maintain it, pay rent, take care of the upkeep, whatever was needed. But this option seems to have completely disappeared in the modern market--you either pay $200k+ for a McMansion, or pay through the nose for a tiny apartment. There are half a dozen houses in my immediate neighborhood that aren't in too bad shape that I would happily pay rent on and do the maintenance, but that will never happen.
 
2012-04-25 01:14:24 PM  

BrynnMacFlynn: And see, this pisses me off. My boyfriend and I are responsible adults who could, if the right place came along, move into a house and maintain it, pay rent, take care of the upkeep, whatever was needed. But this option seems to have completely disappeared in the modern market--you either pay $200k+ for a McMansion, or pay through the nose for a tiny apartment. There are half a dozen houses in my immediate neighborhood that aren't in too bad shape that I would happily pay rent on and do the maintenance, but that will never happen.


Banks aren't in the business of rentals, they're making too much money to care about the peanuts you are willing to pay to rent a nice home that's just sitting there going to waste. Unfortunately, there's no incentive to adjust mortgages with lower rates or even sell the homes at this point, the banks would rather sit on them, package them all in one big deal, then sell them to some broker. It's insane, that millions are homeless or barely scraping by when so many homes are going to waste, but hey, we can't disrupt this wonderful economic system of capitalism!
 
2012-04-25 01:17:30 PM  
upload.wikimedia.org
Burn it
 
2012-04-25 01:26:36 PM  

Bo Giggity: This is the result, when a Congress forces lending to those who can't repay it, then force government "fronts" to buy back that which they know to be worthless, at greatly inflated prices, making their campaign contributors wealthy. But by all means, don't vote out the incumbents.

\mortgage "crisis", nutshell


Actually, they weren't forced to lend to sub-prime borrowers. The problem was regulation removed the checks in place to prevent sub-prime mortgages from being issued and the bankers saw a way to make money off credit default swaps and packaging crap loans with attractive loans and dumping them, screwing up 401ks and such in the process, not to mention all the insurance claims the banks were paid out when they bet the sub-prime loans would fail and then the insurance cos. went out of business. They won, we lost.

I take my car to a transmission shop and the mechanic tells me I don't need such and such part that costs $1,000, all I need is a flush for $80. Great, I can afford that! Car runs great for a year, but then it won't shift out of second. I take it to a new garage and they tell me that first mechanic was full of crap, i should have had the $1,000 job done, and now I'm stuck with a car worth $2,000 that needs a $5,000 transmission job. This is what happened with sub-prime lending. The banks pushed everyone into 3-7 year ARMs, sure they could afford the house, they were told, and in a few years the house will be worth double what they bought it for, and to boot, they'll be able to easily refinance into a 30 year with all the pay increases over the years. What does the borrower know? The borrow isn't the banker, they're not experts in finance, and historically, banks have never lent out risky loans on mortgages, well, that was until they found a way to make more money off their failures. I'm sure there are some irresponsible people who knowingly gabled and lost. But, for every one of those there are probably 20 who trusted the banks to not loan out money unless they could afford to repay it (as they were told they could afford it), people who just aren't knowledgeable about finance (face it, there are some dumb people out there who were/are taken advantage of), or people like the many who had wage freezes/drops/fired/laid off/etc who were stuck once the bankers and their schemes collapsed and F'd the market/jobs. The best part of it all is the fact that many of those with ARMs who have good credit aren't even able to refi to a 30 year because their underwater. At the very least the banks should offer to refi even if they're under, as long as they're still making their payments, but they don't because they're too busy spending money on bonuses and retention payments.

It's criminal, and in 20 years everyone will be amazed we all allowed it to go on with nary a shake of the stick.
 
2012-04-25 01:33:30 PM  

BrynnMacFlynn: you either pay $200k+ for a McMansion


What wonderful, magical place do you live in????
 
2012-04-25 01:39:05 PM  
Wow, in before the DDT retards.
 
2012-04-25 02:06:23 PM  

GBB: Mr. Breeze: My neighbor in Georgia had this problem. Didn't want to take care of his pool and let it turn into a breeding ground. You couldn't go in my backyard for more than 5 minutes without getting eaten alive.

I bought a bucket of pool chlorine shock treatment tabs, climed on my roof, and chucked them over the fence into his pool.

Ingenious.
[t2.gstatic.com image 225x225]
So what did you do when that didn't work??

Chlorine doesn't kill mosquitoes.


Apparently it does dingus, because it worked.
 
2012-04-25 02:18:04 PM  

Doink_Boink: I take my car to a transmission shop and the mechanic tells me I don't need such and such part that costs $1,000, all I need is a flush for $80. Great, I can afford that! Car runs great for a year, but then it won't shift out of second. I take it to a new garage and they tell me that first mechanic was full of crap, i should have had the $1,000 job done, and now I'm stuck with a car worth $2,000 that needs a $5,000 transmission job. This is what happened with sub-prime lending.


This is an excellent analogy and I'm stealing it.
 
2012-04-25 02:22:37 PM  

Bungles: I really don't understand how it's in the banks interest to totally destroy their investment.

Taking ownership, and then renting it straight back to the occupants for a dollar a month would make them far more in the long run. These entire suburbs of ruins aren't helping anyone, monetarily or ethically.


This is something I can't grasp. I know BoA is starting a program to rent foreclosed houses back to their owners, or something along those lines. The vast majority of foreclosures are sitting vacant and not a single bank is doing anything.

The banks don't even need to be ethical! They're losing money by letting the lots sit and rot. The empty homes fall into disrepair and drag the prices of the area further down. Find a way to put a warm body in there, give em an affordable rate and start to recoup the loss!
 
2012-04-25 03:00:49 PM  
Can't any of the towns use "eminent domain" on these abandoned properties and start razing them? I'm pretty sure they used it to build a lot of these houses so why not use it for public health as well, considering the banks are playing the "you can't prove we own it" card?
 
2012-04-25 04:06:08 PM  

Bo Giggity: This is the result, when a Congress forces lending to those who can't repay it, then force government "fronts" to buy back that which they know to be worthless, at greatly inflated prices, making their campaign contributors wealthy. But by all means, don't vote out the incumbents.

\mortgage "crisis", nutshell


Hmm...troll, or have you drunk too deeply from the fountain of derp?
 
2012-04-25 04:34:38 PM  

Dinjiin: AverageAmericanGuy: This seems like a problem that could be solved with a couple hundred dollars of Clorox.

Chlorine gets used up fairly quick when tossed in a pool. It also gets expensive. Our local muni tosses fish into abandoned swimming pools and it takes care of the problem for longer and much cheaper.


The species of fish most widely used to control mosquitoes is, oddly enough, the mosquito fish, Gambusia affinis. As least some municipal governments are paying attention....
 
2012-04-25 04:46:20 PM  
Not a repeat from 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008,...
 
2012-04-25 08:39:41 PM  
They grow progressives in backyard pools?
 
2012-04-25 09:22:23 PM  

canyoneer: Bats are vermin?


2.bp.blogspot.com
 
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