If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Some Guy)   Thanks for using Google Drive, and thanks for letting us use your pictures, video, and other files for our promotional materials ad infinitum. [A.K.A. - Google gets to use any material you sync or upload with Google Drive. Enjoy]   (jeremygibbs.com) divider line 160
    More: Followup, Google Docs, Google, Google products, upload, cloud storage  
•       •       •

4416 clicks; posted to Geek » on 25 Apr 2012 at 6:26 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



160 Comments   (+0 »)
   

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-04-25 10:47:05 AM

Carth: Pertifly: I wanted to look at Google Drive yesterday so like a moran I clicked through it. I have tons of homework saved in Google Docs, well now that all says "Google Drive" and it looks like the only way to get out of Google Drive is to delete my entire Google account. This would be a problem for me. Is that really the only way?

Transfer everything you want to a new owner then share it with yourself on a nondrive google account.


Which would be brilliant...except these are terms from google's unified privacy policy and apply to ALL their services, not just drive.

And if you are just now hearing about this, you deserve to have your most private files read out loud at the superbowl for not bothering to read the terms of service and then getting outraged.
 
2012-04-25 10:49:03 AM

dittybopper: How often do you need to back up personal data?

Again, it's not like a business where it will cost you thousands or millions of dollars for every day of data lost, or every day you can't access it. Personal backups can be sporadic and still be OK. For example, you'd probably want to back up your tax data after you've filed your taxes. So you write those out to the hard drive, and stick it in the safe. Whenever you do something "important", which for most of us is fairly rarely, you back that up, and stick it in the safe.

Now, I've been in the IT business for well over 2 decades now, and when I look at it, honestly, there is almost no personal electronic data that I have at home that is *VITAL* that I retain no matter what. Any thing I have that is that important gets printed out and put in the safe, so there is a hard copy of it available even in situations where it would be impossible to access the data electronically. The rest of it is relatively inconsequential. Sure, it would suck if we lost the photos of the littlebopper growing up, but that wouldn't be the end of the World.

It's a different philosophy for personal data than for business data.


Way back in 2006 my hard drive died. I had been somewhat good about doing a comprehensive backup of all documents, pictures and e-mails every few months, but I ended up losing several months of data. Why the lost data didn't monetarily cost me anything, there were some files that I was upset over having lost.

Today I use Time Machine to constantly backup to an external hard drive as well as Backblaze to backup offsite. While I could go on with life if I lost all of my data, I have about 40 GB of photos that I'd prefer not lose and about 10 years of documents from previous jobs that I still refer to from time to time.

I think I'm pretty well covered with a system that is basically 100% automated at a minimum cost (Backblaze is $60/year). And while I concede that it's highly unlikely I'll ever need to use the Backblaze backup (my house would have to burn down), for $60 a month I view it as low cost disaster insurance.

At minimum everyone should use Time Machine or a similar program with an external hard drive. There is nothing all uncommon about hard drives crashing.
 
2012-04-25 10:50:45 AM

Lusiphur: Carth: Pertifly: I wanted to look at Google Drive yesterday so like a moran I clicked through it. I have tons of homework saved in Google Docs, well now that all says "Google Drive" and it looks like the only way to get out of Google Drive is to delete my entire Google account. This would be a problem for me. Is that really the only way?

Transfer everything you want to a new owner then share it with yourself on a nondrive google account.

Which would be brilliant...except these are terms from google's unified privacy policy and apply to ALL their services, not just drive.

And if you are just now hearing about this, you deserve to have your most private files read out loud at the superbowl for not bothering to read the terms of service and then getting outraged.


I pay for a business account so I never read the standard user privacy policy.
 
2012-04-25 10:54:35 AM
My wife and I have a shiat-ton of fairly cool shots from all around the world stored on our Zenfolio account. Anyone can grab them anytime they want, I don't care.

That said... the ones that include my teenage daughter are kept in the password-protected albums. Just because, you know, it's the goddamn internet.
 
2012-04-25 10:55:20 AM

thornhill: A Leaf in Fall: I am not as concerned about the backup of my files as I am the ability to update files and have them immediately available for my business partner to use on a different device at any given time. The primary concern with Drive at this point is that we are developing some intellectual property.

Exactly.

It seems like people don't get the purpose of these services -- they're much more about file sharing than data backup.

For example, I use Dropbox at my company to collaborate on files with vendors outside of the company network.


... why? Don't you have an IT guy that can open a port on your router? I would never, ever use these services to transfer business files.
 
2012-04-25 11:05:56 AM
I don't need no stinking clouds.

www.kitguru.net
 
2012-04-25 11:07:30 AM

Shazam999: thornhill: A Leaf in Fall: I am not as concerned about the backup of my files as I am the ability to update files and have them immediately available for my business partner to use on a different device at any given time. The primary concern with Drive at this point is that we are developing some intellectual property.

Exactly.

It seems like people don't get the purpose of these services -- they're much more about file sharing than data backup.

For example, I use Dropbox at my company to collaborate on files with vendors outside of the company network.

... why? Don't you have an IT guy that can open a port on your router? I would never, ever use these services to transfer business files.


The files aren't sensitive and going through IT is a major pain in the ass.
 
2012-04-25 11:10:23 AM
I just split it: SkyDrive for more "standard" stuff from my computer and Dropbox for more eccentric files and group projects.

I believe both Dropbox and SkyDrive say, "what you upload is yours; we just give a place to put it."

Gotta wonder if that kind of license language makes Google liable for any pirated content on there. Either way, they're unusually late to the party.
 
2012-04-25 11:10:53 AM

redpanda2: For those who jump on the outrage bandwagon without reading the quoted section in full.

Your Content in our Services

Some of our Services allow you to submit content. You retain ownership of any intellectual property rights that you hold in that content. In short, what belongs to you stays yours.

When you upload or otherwise submit content to our Services, you give Google (and those we work with) a worldwide license to use, host, store, reproduce, modify, create derivative works (such as those resulting from translations, adaptations or other changes we make so that your content works better with our Services), communicate, publish, publicly perform, publicly display and distribute such content. The rights you grant in this license are for the limited purpose of operating, promoting, and improving our Services, and to develop new ones. This license continues even if you stop using our Services (for example, for a business listing you have added to Google Maps). Some Services may offer you ways to access and remove content that has been provided to that Service. Also, in some of our Services, there are terms or settings that narrow the scope of our use of the content submitted in those Services. Make sure you have the necessary rights to grant us this license for any content that you submit to our Services.

You can find more information about how Google uses and stores content in the privacy policy or additional terms for particular Services. If you submit feedback or suggestions about our Services, we may use your feedback or suggestions without obligation to you.

This is a general TOS that covers ALL google products. The idea that someone at Google is going to pluck out the screenplay you store in Drive and copy/publish/modify it is absurd.


OK. Now you go and find me the narrowed terms or available settings for Drive. I challenge you and I hope you actually can find them, but I don't think they exist. All I can find are their umbrella terms and I don't feel like signing up just to see if there are any settings to limit their use of my data in Drive.

I think it is foolish to put any sensitive data in the cloud without some kind of assurance against it being leaked. Your own encryption is probably the best bet - TrueCrypt/RealCrypt is free, strong and cross-platform.
 
2012-04-25 11:12:14 AM

thornhill: going through IT is a major pain in the ass.


It shouldn't be, unless one of two cases is true:

A: You've got an obstructionist in IT, or
B: What you are asking for goes against good IT practice, or local policy.

In the real world, you won't be able to tell the difference between the two. To you, both cases will appear identical.
 
2012-04-25 11:18:34 AM

thisone: what the heck ya'll are backing up for personal data that's so special as to require a waterproof fireproof backup.


Rough drafts, pictures, etc.

I got a 2TB drive but I'll never need that amount of space (it was on sale for 50% off.) I also use Dropbox and my own website server to backup really important stuff. There are things I'd just absolutely die if I lost. Some of my stories I've put years of work into.
 
2012-04-25 11:21:41 AM

Guuberre: You know, for the princely sum of $130, you can buy a 2 TB external HDD (USB 3.0). That's pretty sufficient for my backup purposes.


Came here to say this. And:

onhuge.com
 
2012-04-25 11:23:18 AM

jaylectricity: I hate this whole cloud thing.

I was thinking the other day...if you lease a car, are you allowed to repair it yourself or are you technically working on something you don't own?


Why would you repair it yourself? If you're leasing a car it's covered by manufacturer's warranty. You'd be expected to take it to the dealer for any service it needs.
 
2012-04-25 11:26:57 AM
A lot of freaking out over nothing. Here's the terms quoted and obvious reason why they're there:

You give Google (and those we work with) a worldwide license to

1) use, generic term, just means that they can touch it
2) host, Duh, you put it on their servers
3) store, See #2
4) reproduce, Needed for general hosting functions such as mirroring
5) modify, See #4 and #6
6) create derivative works (such as those resulting from translations, adaptations or other changes we make so that your content works better with our Services), Explains itself
7) communicate, Needed in order to let anyone, even yourself, view it
8) publish, Needed for when you share anything with anyone
9) publicly perform, See #8
10) publicly display and See #8
11) distribute such content. See #7 and #8

The rights you grant in this license are for the limited purpose of operating, promoting, and improving our Services, and to develop new ones.
Yes, promotion is there but as others have pointed out no one should care if they show your or your friends data in an ad that you already shared with said friends

This license continues even if you stop using our Services.
The fact that you stopped using the service doesn't mean that your shared data suddenly stops being shared. This clause doesn't cover when you unshare your data, delete it, or remove your account.

Calm down.
 
2012-04-25 11:30:16 AM
Anyone ever try Crashplan?

everyone in my family has a mac and some sort of time machine backup, but if there's a fire at one of their houses they're screwed. Crashplan lets you basically p2p encrypted backups with friends, so there could be some redundancy.
 
2012-04-25 11:31:12 AM
osxdaily.com

1) Get 2TB drive for ~$140
2) Enable Time Machine
3) Quit worrying (as much)

After having used multiple backup solutions over the years, Time Machine is far and away the best I have ever used. Turn it on, forget about it.

And yes, you can do full system restores from it.
 
2012-04-25 11:31:30 AM
If you store your stuff on ANY public service like skydrive or drop box without encrypting it, you're an idiot. Hell, if you store your stuff ANYWHERE without encrypting it, you don't even know what you don't know.


End of thread.
 
2012-04-25 11:33:30 AM
I don't know...this sounds way too over the top.

What if they are introducing the product with a controversial element to the terms, then everyone will be talking about the controversy/it's in the news everywhere/free promotion of the product (the Kardashian effect, if you will).

Then they later remove the controversial part of the terms and everyone wants to sign up?

I'm only thinking this because if just a quiet announcement of a new cloud-based storage service may just be a slight blurb in the news/dud potential.
 
2012-04-25 11:38:04 AM

dittybopper: thornhill: going through IT is a major pain in the ass.

It shouldn't be, unless one of two cases is true:

A: You've got an obstructionist in IT, or
B: What you are asking for goes against good IT practice, or local policy.

In the real world, you won't be able to tell the difference between the two. To you, both cases will appear identical.


Not quite. This is a classic case of IT having a blanket policy that treats all files as state secrets to prevent someone from doing something idiotic. They're basically trying to make the system as fool proof as possible.

I cannot blame them for doing that, but it also unnecessarily slows down productivity. Rather than have to get into a conversation with IT for every file I want to easily share, I'm responsible enough to make the judgement call about whether the data being shared is sensitive, would it matter if it was somehow leaked. And I do know better than IT what is sensitive and what isn't.
 
2012-04-25 11:38:57 AM

Hand Banana: Let's see, buy a cheap external hard drive and have instant and secure access to all of your files anywhere, or pay for some stupid "cloud" service and put up with long upload and download times as well as letting who the hell knows access/steal/lose your files. ]

Tough choice.


Yeah, portable hard drives are a perfect way to store information. Until you drop it, someone spills something on it, your house burns down with it inside... etc.

It's also really, really fun to pack up the cables and carry a giant brick around with you to access all that data from anywhere!

DropBox actually does pretty well handling upload/download in the background ... it's handy for getting things between my various computers and even sharing to others through the public folder.

That said, I'd use a cloud data service as backup or for transferring specific files I work with between multiple computers... but probably wouldn't bank on it for anything I wanted kept private. Unless I encrypted it first myself I guess...
 
2012-04-25 11:48:16 AM
Telos:DropBox actually does pretty well handling upload/download in the background ... it's handy for getting things between my various computers and even sharing to others through the public folder.

That said, I'd use a cloud data service as backup or for transferring specific files I work with between multiple computers... but probably wouldn't bank on it for anything I wanted kept private. Unless I encrypted it first myself I guess...

Yeah, DropBox is pretty slick. I also like that it has iOS client software. That came in very handy during my recent custody dispute. I would put various PDFs on my DropBox folder, and either share it with my attorney (she had access to that folder), or show it to her on my iPad.

Worked pretty well. Kept me from having to fax things to her office. (Yes, I said "fax". Attorneys still use fax machines all the time. This was amazing to me, but it apparently not uncommon, even though the last time I checked the calendar the year was 2012.)
 
2012-04-25 11:55:38 AM

illegal.tender: Telos:DropBox actually does pretty well handling upload/download in the background ... it's handy for getting things between my various computers and even sharing to others through the public folder.

That said, I'd use a cloud data service as backup or for transferring specific files I work with between multiple computers... but probably wouldn't bank on it for anything I wanted kept private. Unless I encrypted it first myself I guess...

Yeah, DropBox is pretty slick. I also like that it has iOS client software. That came in very handy during my recent custody dispute. I would put various PDFs on my DropBox folder, and either share it with my attorney (she had access to that folder), or show it to her on my iPad.

Worked pretty well. Kept me from having to fax things to her office. (Yes, I said "fax". Attorneys still use fax machines all the time. This was amazing to me, but it apparently not uncommon, even though the last time I checked the calendar the year was 2012.)



Heh, that's nothing... my company works with a vendor for certain printer repairs. They still demand we fax them requests for service. Yes, an IT service company that demands faxes.

I mean, I expect lawyers to be behind the times... not the guy repairing my computers.
 
2012-04-25 11:59:24 AM

RatOmeter: OK. Now you go and find me the narrowed terms or available settings for Drive. I challenge you and I hope you actually can find them, but I don't think they exist. All I can find are their umbrella terms and I don't feel like signing up just to see if there are any settings to limit their use of my data in Drive.


You mean when the default sharing setting for any document you create or upload is "Private - Only the people listed below can access"? That sounds like an instance of the available settings they're talking about. Although I admit I'd feel better about this if they had a narrowed set of terms for Drive.
 
2012-04-25 12:00:30 PM

serial_crusher: A Tsunami wipes out your neighborhood, but you happen to be at work when the evacuation starts so you don't have time to grab the backup. The authorities won't let you back home because the nearby nuclear reactor could melt down any second. How are you going to access your data now, huh huh huh?


What's funny is that this scenario could actually apply to me.
 
2012-04-25 12:01:21 PM

serial_crusher: miscreant: Doctor Jan Itor: It sounds like the data isn't actually encrypted, otherwise how would they have any access to it? You could just create a TrueCrypt partition file and put that in the cloud.

You could, but kind of a pain in the ass to have to sync a huge TrueCrypt partition every time you change a 1KB document inside it.

They should be smart enough to only transfer the modified blocks, but a quick google search tells me that Dropbox has some problems with that.
Of course you don't need to put all your sensitive 1KB files in a giant TrueCrypt partition when there are plenty of other encryption schemes that would just encrypt the contents of a single file. Or hell, a 1.1KB TrueCrypt partition would hold that thing just fine.

Also, Carbonite allows you to configure their client to do the encryption with a key that only you keep. Standard paranoia rules apply as to whether or not a backdoor in the client is secretly sending that key to the NSA anyhow, though.


I prefer Crashplan to Carbonite or Mozy myself. Even has a your own key option, backup to local folders, backup to other PCs you have, and online. Online backup is nice just in case everything hits the fan.
 
2012-04-25 12:02:37 PM

thornhill: It seems like people don't get the purpose of these services -- they're much more about file sharing than data backup.


Phrased another way, it seems like the providers of these services don't get the needs of the users -- they're much more interested in data back up than file sharing.
 
2012-04-25 12:25:53 PM
Between this and twitter's court ruling (twitter owns all of your tweets BTW), it's a wonder that anyone would post anything online at all.

This means Google owns that copy of your financial information that was on your computer as well.
 
2012-04-25 12:34:34 PM
miscreant:

Doctor Jan Itor: It sounds like the data isn't actually encrypted, otherwise how would they have any access to it? You could just create a TrueCrypt partition file and put that in the cloud.

You could, but kind of a pain in the ass to have to sync a huge TrueCrypt partition every time you change a 1KB document inside it.


I've never tried it, but rsync would probably handle that just fine. It has a pretty slick diff copy function. and Truecrypt files aren't completely rehashed every time you change something in them. In fact, that's how I handle GB+ database files on my brother's company server. Every night a machine here in my office goes in over SSH to his production server and rsyncs it to a machine here. Quick, secure, no muss no fuss.

This thread is giving me an idea for a nifty net appliance. Gut an pair of old low-power laptops, put them each in a simple box with a power cord and a network cable jack. Set them up with a stripped version of Linux and pair the SSH keys so each box could only talk to it's twin. Give one box to a trusted party (say a family member) and you put one on your network, and you each get automated offsite backup.
 
2012-04-25 12:40:57 PM

Expolaris: Ahem.

https://pogoplug.com/

Pogoplug. I've been using it for a while. I have the pogo plug classic drive. I plug in a few externals into the little gizmo and it puts up my own cloud storage server. I can stream movies from it, i stream music to my iPhone on it, it's been a wonderful addition to my network.

You can also just run the server program from your computer if that's your cup of tea, but i'd rather keep my server separate. I used to run the program when all i had was a netbook and a terabyte external, i would stream movies into the computer labs at my grad school while i worked all night.

also not mine but the way the thing looks, i high recommend it to those who want their cloud storage with their external in one package.

[farm8.staticflickr.com image 480x640]


Irritating that nowhere on their site do they list the capacity of the drives. Every other link you click takes you to a credit card entry form. If you click on the link to get info about their client software, it starts downloading the program immediately. I feel like I'm being harassed by a pushy salesman.
 
2012-04-25 12:45:20 PM

poot_rootbeer: thornhill: It seems like people don't get the purpose of these services -- they're much more about file sharing than data backup.

Phrased another way, it seems like the providers of these services don't get the needs of the users -- they're much more interested in data back up than file sharing.


No.

There are online backup services already out there, such as Backblaze and Carbonite.

You could certainly use services like Dropbox for online backup, but it's purposely optimized for filing sharing (it automatically updates changes to files rather than doing everything on a schedule, folders and individual files can be shared with anyone, etc).
 
2012-04-25 12:55:38 PM

thornhill: And I do know better than IT what is sensitive and what isn't.


Maybe you actually do. Then again, maybe you don't. There are plenty of people who think they know X better than the IT department. Sometimes they are even correct.

Problem is, as you indirectly pointed out, not every knows what data is sensitive or not. I don't know how many times I've sat in a meeting where certain data was requested and I had to say "Hey, do you *REALLY* need it, or are you just asking for it because you want it?" I then point out the potential costs if they lose the data. I mean, when you have personal information on tens of thousands of people, and if it gets compromised, you have to pay for things like credit monitoring of every one of them you can contact for something like 3 years. Just sending the letters alone is a significant cost*. That adds up, and that's not to mention the bad publicity.

Of course, if they can justify it, then that's OK, provided they take the necessary precautions. Obviously a payroll department is going to need SSN's, for example.


*Bulk presorted machinable first class mail is around $0.22 a piece, and as low as $0.13 for non-profits. If you have to send 50,000 letters, that's $6,500 to $11,00 in initial mail costs alone.
 
2012-04-25 01:02:35 PM
truecrypt + use 20 character passwords and only upload encrypted containers to skydrive and google drive. If I have a data failure, I can download the files and unencrypt locally. If they wont let you upload an encrypted file, just change the extension to .jpg and change it back when you download it.
 
2012-04-25 01:12:59 PM
Google actually demands a "a worldwide license to use, host, store, reproduce, modify, create derivative works (such as those resulting from translations, adaptations or other changes we make so that your content works better with our Services), communicate, publish, publicly perform, publicly display and distribute" your stuff, but Microsoft is somehow "evil" for not claiming anything of the sort and clearly stating that they don't have a right to your stuff.

While fanboys were busy extolling the virtues of Google and Apple and slamming Microsoft, the world quietly changed around them. Microsoft, oddly enough, is the good guy these days.
 
2012-04-25 01:17:40 PM

MindStalker: Pertifly: I wanted to look at Google Drive yesterday so like a moran I clicked through it. I have tons of homework saved in Google Docs, well now that all says "Google Drive" and it looks like the only way to get out of Google Drive is to delete my entire Google account. This would be a problem for me. Is that really the only way?

Your Google Docs were already under these same terms of service. These terms of service are universal across all Google products. They may in the future add a specific term of service for Google Drive to clear up misconception about their use of your files, but for now Google Drive falls under the universal Google terms of service, which is what is being quoted in the article and everyone is upset about.


Yep. Google made it clear, early on, that they essentially have unlimited rights to do whatever they want with whatever you give them. This isn't new - what's new is realizing that whole "Don't Be Evil" crap went out the window pretty damned quick, when Google realized they had to cash in on what they had. I'm always amused when yet another person discovers that Google has claimed unlimited rights to anything & everything you've ever handed over to a Google app, and acts horrified about it.
 
2012-04-25 01:18:14 PM

dittybopper: thornhill: And I do know better than IT what is sensitive and what isn't.

Maybe you actually do. Then again, maybe you don't. There are plenty of people who think they know X better than the IT department. Sometimes they are even correct.

Problem is, as you indirectly pointed out, not every knows what data is sensitive or not. I don't know how many times I've sat in a meeting where certain data was requested and I had to say "Hey, do you *REALLY* need it, or are you just asking for it because you want it?" I then point out the potential costs if they lose the data. I mean, when you have personal information on tens of thousands of people, and if it gets compromised, you have to pay for things like credit monitoring of every one of them you can contact for something like 3 years. Just sending the letters alone is a significant cost*. That adds up, and that's not to mention the bad publicity.

Of course, if they can justify it, then that's OK, provided they take the necessary precautions. Obviously a payroll department is going to need SSN's, for example.


*Bulk presorted machinable first class mail is around $0.22 a piece, and as low as $0.13 for non-profits. If you have to send 50,000 letters, that's $6,500 to $11,00 in initial mail costs alone.


I am willing to assume the personal responsibility of recognizing when my data needs to be secure or not.
 
2012-04-25 01:22:41 PM

thornhill: I cannot blame them for doing that, but it also unnecessarily slows down productivity. Rather than have to get into a conversation with IT for every file I want to easily share, I'm responsible enough to make the judgement call about whether the data being shared is sensitive, would it matter if it was somehow leaked. And I do know better than IT what is sensitive and what isn't.


Oh yeah, nobody's ever lost any important data because they felt they had the right to treat it any way they wanted.
 
2012-04-25 01:22:54 PM

thornhill: dittybopper: thornhill: going through IT is a major pain in the ass.

It shouldn't be, unless one of two cases is true:

A: You've got an obstructionist in IT, or
B: What you are asking for goes against good IT practice, or local policy.

In the real world, you won't be able to tell the difference between the two. To you, both cases will appear identical.

Not quite. This is a classic case of IT having a blanket policy that treats all files as state secrets to prevent someone from doing something idiotic. They're basically trying to make the system as fool proof as possible.

I cannot blame them for doing that, but it also unnecessarily slows down productivity. Rather than have to get into a conversation with IT for every file I want to easily share, I'm responsible enough to make the judgement call about whether the data being shared is sensitive, would it matter if it was somehow leaked. And I do know better than IT what is sensitive and what isn't.


Well, I guess your IT department sucks. It's not their duty at all to determine what's sensitive or not. They should just set you up with some sort of file sharing mechanism and leave it at that.
 
2012-04-25 01:29:12 PM

Splinshints: That said, what sort of idiots would work on a leased car themselves aside from necessary maintenance? Typically a lease runs shorter than or equal to the warranty period. Would you do your own repairs on a car you bought if it was still under warranty?


Yeah, I guess I hadn't thought of it that way. I've never leased a car.
 
2012-04-25 01:38:53 PM

DieAchtung: If you store your stuff on ANY public service like skydrive or drop box without encrypting it, you're an idiot. Hell, if you store your stuff ANYWHERE without encrypting it, you don't even know what you don't know.


End of thread.


I use Dropbox for save game backups (Skyrim, Mass Effect, Diablo 2). If someone gets access to that, I don't care.
 
2012-04-25 01:39:13 PM
Just for completeness, I guess I should mention that http://one.ubuntu.com is a free 5GB cloud that works great under Debian... You just right-click folders you want synced and it's fast and unubtrusive. I can't speak for the Mac or Windows clients.

I don't use it for tons of stuff though, just timesheets, invoices and occasional documents going between my laptop and desktop.
 
2012-04-25 01:45:35 PM

finnished: thornhill: I cannot blame them for doing that, but it also unnecessarily slows down productivity. Rather than have to get into a conversation with IT for every file I want to easily share, I'm responsible enough to make the judgement call about whether the data being shared is sensitive, would it matter if it was somehow leaked. And I do know better than IT what is sensitive and what isn't.

Oh yeah, nobody's ever lost any important data because they felt they had the right to treat it any way they wanted.


As I said before, I'm willing to assume personal responsibility for my data. I don't need a data nanny.

And I deal with PCI issues all the time, so I'm quite aware of what needs to be secure.
 
2012-04-25 01:51:56 PM
Google has been sucking more and more since it went public.

Damnit, Google, stop showing me pages that don't have my search terms on them! That's why I started using you in the first place. The + character doesn't work as described and putting single works in quotes brings up problems too.
 
2012-04-25 01:54:13 PM

way south: But in practice I'm not comfortable with keeping my information on someone elses drive. Not without some guarantee that they wont read, send, Fark with or otherwise exploit that data for their own benefit.


You aren't alone, I know I feel the same way. I thought about just using a strong encryption method and setting manual backups instead of automatic whole-disk. But then incremental backups don't work.

It also stinks now that Cox and Comcast, probably others, have bandwidth limits. If I upload everything on my backup drive I will burn an entire month and get throttled the next month.

I got a WD USB 3.0 drive and it's incredibly fast, I love it.
 
2012-04-25 02:04:50 PM
I have the same cheap windows box I use for my TV also be my raid 10 network backup. Shove your cloud where the sun don`t shine.

root88: Damnit, Google, stop showing me pages that don't have my search terms on them! That's why I started using you in the first place.


I`m also looking for a search engine that finds what I am searching for. Google was it but then they changed what it was and now it is weird and scary and DOESN`T FIND WHAT I AM LOOKING FOR ANYMORE!
 
2012-04-25 02:07:06 PM

pdieten: jaylectricity: I hate this whole cloud thing.

I was thinking the other day...if you lease a car, are you allowed to repair it yourself or are you technically working on something you don't own?

Why would you repair it yourself? If you're leasing a car it's covered by manufacturer's warranty. You'd be expected to take it to the dealer for any service it needs.


For free. That`s the important bit.

free repairs on leased items...
 
2012-04-25 03:01:27 PM
I just noticed that my Android device has Google Drive appearing in my "Updates" section of Google Play. So anybody who hits the multiple update button will install it without even being aware of it.
 
2012-04-25 03:32:14 PM

dready zim: I`m also looking for a search engine that finds what I am searching for. Google was it but then they changed what it was and now it is weird and scary and DOESN`T FIND WHAT I AM LOOKING FOR ANYMORE!


Try this: Link

It's basically Google, but without Google remembering what you've searched for before.

I tried it, but realized I actually like that Google knows a little bit about me.
 
2012-04-25 04:09:00 PM
I rent an apartment in town and have my house. There are giant gun safes at either. I frequently move drives back and forth. I don't bother with encrypting most things though I do use TrueImage (Is there a space?) and those backups that I make are manually encrypted. The rest, incremental, are not. I don't have much to hide really. LOL Everything I need hidden is hidden in my head. Life is good when it is that simple though, I suppose, it isn't the easiest of places to be.
 
2012-04-25 04:58:40 PM
I thought "all data should be open and free" ? Or does that only count for the music and movies you download not your stuff?
 
2012-04-25 05:14:42 PM
That's why I use SugarSync:

Your Files are not accessible by third parties unless you elect to make them available to others through the Service. We respect the privacy and confidentiality of your Files, so we agree never to disclose your Files to anyone unless you instruct us to do so or a court orders us to disclose them, as provided in our Privacy Policy.
 
Displayed 50 of 160 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | » | Last | Show all



This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report