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(Ledger-Enquirer)   Sheriff opens special housing unit in his jail just for military veterans to ensure that they get the PTSD and other mental health treatment that they desperately need. Tag is for Sheriff and Veterans   (ledger-enquirer.com ) divider line 146
    More: Hero, PTSD, New Horizons, mental health counseling, veterans, mental healths  
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9762 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Apr 2012 at 5:08 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-04-24 03:54:49 PM  
Oh, sure, it *SOUNDS* like a good thing, until you find out this is the guy the sheriff put in charge of it:

images3.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2012-04-24 04:29:45 PM  

dittybopper: Oh, sure, it *SOUNDS* like a good thing, until you find out this is the guy the sheriff put in charge of it:

[images3.wikia.nocookie.net image 191x201]


"Shave him dry, he can take it!"
 
2012-04-24 04:51:39 PM  
So a vet's best hope to get desperately needed treatment is to go to jail? God bless America!
 
2012-04-24 04:59:34 PM  

nekom: So a vet's best hope to get desperately needed treatment is to go to jail? God bless America!


Same with regular folks and health care.
 
2012-04-24 05:04:08 PM  
Hm. While on the surface, this does sound like a good idea & I can see the value in keeping the veterans together and getting them the help they need. However....

FTFA: Veterans who live in the dormitory will have access to a variety of community services, such as a PTSD treatment program and a special Veterans Court.

A special court? That seems unfair.
 
2012-04-24 05:07:09 PM  
How about opening up more treatment centers for these people before they end up in jail? Or better yet, how about we focus on treating PTSD while they're still in the farking military?

Oh, right. We don't actually give a shiat beyond putting yellow ribbon magnets on shiat.
 
2012-04-24 05:10:03 PM  

Di Atribe: Hm. While on the surface, this does sound like a good idea & I can see the value in keeping the veterans together and getting them the help they need. However....

FTFA: Veterans who live in the dormitory will have access to a variety of community services, such as a PTSD treatment program and a special Veterans Court.

A special court? That seems unfair.


It mostly just for basketball.
 
2012-04-24 05:13:26 PM  

nekom: So a vet's best hope to get desperately needed treatment is to go to jail? God bless America!


I don't care, as long as they're getting the desperately needed treatment, ffs.
 
2012-04-24 05:15:51 PM  
A prison actually attempting to address the root causes of what might have lead to someone committing a crime in the first place instead of just locking them in time out for a few years?

Perish the thought.


/PTSD treatment should be available for anyone who needs it, not just Soldiers
 
2012-04-24 05:15:59 PM  
But if you aren't a veteran and are a crazy bum you go to regular jail.

/veteran
// almost a crazy bum
 
2012-04-24 05:16:07 PM  
The words, "closing", "stable-door", and, "after horse has bolted," spring to mind. Can't imagine why.
 
2012-04-24 05:16:57 PM  

Cagey B: How about opening up more treatment centers for these people before they end up in jail? Or better yet, how about we focus on treating PTSD while they're still in the farking military?

Oh, right. We don't actually give a shiat beyond putting yellow ribbon magnets on shiat.


Next you're going to suggest we make sure people have access to basic health services so they stop clogging up the ER or quit giving out handicap stickers to fat people so folks without legs can park up close to the bank instead of across the lot.
 
2012-04-24 05:17:22 PM  
That's great and all, but how about any prisoners who need mental health services? Screw them... like normal?
 
2012-04-24 05:19:55 PM  
Somebody clicked the wrong tag. You obviously meant img1.fark.net or img1.fark.net
 
2012-04-24 05:20:23 PM  
I am sure there are lots of people with mental health issues in jail. Shouldn't they all be equal before the law?

If veterans need special therapy there are VA hospitals they could work with.
 
2012-04-24 05:22:01 PM  

2wolves: nekom: So a vet's best hope to get desperately needed treatment is to go to jail? God bless America!

Same with regular folks and health care.


Except that with regular folks, good luck with getting that jail house health care. The rumors that excellent or even adequate health care is routinely available for prisoners is not fact based.
 
2012-04-24 05:22:07 PM  
NkThrasher: /PTSD treatment should be available for anyone who needs it, not just Soldiers

Problem is that seeking mental health in many professions, from Police Officers, to Healthcare Workers, to Military, is viewed as a stigmata and weakness. There ARE services out there for these people, but the thing is, it can be a career killer to use them - especially for military.
 
2012-04-24 05:24:25 PM  

Gyrfalcon: nekom: So a vet's best hope to get desperately needed treatment is to go to jail? God bless America!

I don't care, as long as they're getting the desperately needed treatment, ffs.


its the only place left at this point.. cuz socialisms...
 
2012-04-24 05:25:41 PM  

BronyMedic: Problem is that seeking mental health in many professions, from Police Officers, to Healthcare Workers, to Military, is viewed as a stigmata and weakness. There ARE services out there for these people, but the thing is, it can be a career killer to use them - especially for military.


I'm well aware of the stigma that can come with seeking mental health as a Service Member.

But that is completely unrelated to the fact that PTSD treatment should be available for anyone who needs it, not just to those that society deems as 'special'.


/Former Soldier
 
2012-04-24 05:25:52 PM  

BronyMedic: NkThrasher: /PTSD treatment should be available for anyone who needs it, not just Soldiers

Problem is that seeking mental health in many professions, from Police Officers, to Healthcare Workers, to Military, is viewed as a stigmata and weakness. There ARE services out there for these people, but the thing is, it can be a career killer to use them - especially for military.


It's not just the stigma associated with seeking treatment; it's the fact that treatment is so goddamn expensive! Even with healthcare you're still looking at $250-$350 a month for proper treatment of PTSD symptoms. Most people, LEO, military, librarian or office jockey can't afford it.
 
2012-04-24 05:25:55 PM  
That'll teach them for serving our country.
 
2012-04-24 05:26:22 PM  
I can see vets getting special treatment in that case, they are nuts to begin with is because the majority of Americans thought it was a great idea to invade a country for no reason and then we sent them over there to do it.
 
2012-04-24 05:27:57 PM  

BronyMedic: NkThrasher: /PTSD treatment should be available for anyone who needs it, not just Soldiers

Problem is that seeking mental health in many professions, from Police Officers, to Healthcare Workers, to Military, is viewed as a stigmata and weakness. There ARE services out there for these people, but the thing is, it can be a career killer to use them - especially for military.


Indeed. I work with an Iraq vet and his dad (who also works here) and fiance are concerned that he needs PTSD treatment, but he refuses to submit to it. It's not like it isn't available to him, he just refuses to acknowledge the problem. If it takes jail time to get them to do compulsory treatment, I'm for it.
 
2012-04-24 05:29:17 PM  

CapeFearCadaver: BronyMedic: NkThrasher: /PTSD treatment should be available for anyone who needs it, not just Soldiers

Problem is that seeking mental health in many professions, from Police Officers, to Healthcare Workers, to Military, is viewed as a stigmata and weakness. There ARE services out there for these people, but the thing is, it can be a career killer to use them - especially for military.

It's not just the stigma associated with seeking treatment; it's the fact that treatment is so goddamn expensive! Even with healthcare you're still looking at $250-$350 a month for proper treatment of PTSD symptoms. Most people, LEO, military, librarian or office jockey can't afford it.


I am pretty sure the military can.
 
2012-04-24 05:29:21 PM  

StaleCoffee: Cagey B: How about opening up more treatment centers for these people before they end up in jail? Or better yet, how about we focus on treating PTSD while they're still in the farking military?

Oh, right. We don't actually give a shiat beyond putting yellow ribbon magnets on shiat.

Next you're going to suggest we make sure people have access to basic health services so they stop clogging up the ER or quit giving out handicap stickers to fat people so folks without legs can park up close to the bank instead of across the lot.


I have this image in my head of a herd of quadruple-amputees running on all four stumps towards a bank entrance. There's a cowboy there, and he starts lassoing the ones at the head of the pack to divert the stampede into a liquor store. Meanwhile, there is a full orchestra playing Copland's "Hoe Down." YEEE HAW!!!

trustedadvisor.com
 
2012-04-24 05:30:50 PM  
So if you're a veteran you deserve to get better treatment than the other criminals?
 
2012-04-24 05:32:23 PM  

BronyMedic: NkThrasher: /PTSD treatment should be available for anyone who needs it, not just Soldiers

Problem is that seeking mental health in many professions, from Police Officers, to Healthcare Workers, to Military, is viewed as a stigmata and weakness. There ARE services out there for these people, but the thing is, it can be a career killer to use them - especially for military.


THIS.

The biggest reason a lot of vets don't want to seek treatment of any kind, even just someone to talk to, is NOT a fear of "I'll look weak if I do". It's actually a much more realistic fear of "what opportunities will I get passed over for if I have this on my record?". It may not be anything even remotely serious or debilitating. But if having to check "yes" on the "Have you ever been seen by a mental health professional?" sort of questions on some job apps is enough to get your app shuffled to the bottom of the stack, it's not wroth seeking help.
 
2012-04-24 05:34:24 PM  

Di Atribe: Hm. While on the surface, this does sound like a good idea & I can see the value in keeping the veterans together and getting them the help they need. However....

FTFA: Veterans who live in the dormitory will have access to a variety of community services, such as a PTSD treatment program and a special Veterans Court.

A special court? That seems unfair.


Yeah, it does. We do like to go overboard in our tribute-paying to anyone claiming the "hero" title but that's because we know we are suck insufferable pricks to one another under normal circumstances. No offense to veterans. Maybe if we did what was right by everyone all the time - including basics for service people and their families - we wouldn't need this maudlin laurel wreath stuff.
 
2012-04-24 05:34:47 PM  
Stress????

That's a rich man's "disease"
 
2012-04-24 05:35:23 PM  
As an Army Paralegal/Ex Combat Engineer who thinks some vets have done great things, yet bad crimes... this is probably the best way to deal with an awful situation. I felt incredibly guilty helping punish soldiers... often ones I personally have worked with. The JAG Corps can really strip away a lot of help some people can have. This may very well be the last chance that people we (Army Lawyers and Paralegals) too often treat as lesser vessels.
 
2012-04-24 05:36:55 PM  
Treatment for PTSD, whether acquired as an adult on the field of battle or as a child in an abusive home, shouldn't be seen as a special benefit one earns with veteran status. It should be provided as a standard of care for ANYONE who needs it.

Veterans have earned special benefits, but basic mental health treatment shouldn't be considered a perk.
 
TWX
2012-04-24 05:37:09 PM  

cgraves67:
Indeed. I work with an Iraq vet and his dad (who also works here) and fiance are concerned that he needs PTSD treatment, but he refuses to submit to it. It's not like it isn't available to him, he just refuses to acknowledge the problem. If it takes jail time to get them to do compulsory treatment, I'm for it.


Get him a membership at the local VFW. He might be more amenable to talking about it with other soldiers over a beer.
 
2012-04-24 05:38:09 PM  

NkThrasher: But that is completely unrelated to the fact that PTSD treatment should be available for anyone who needs it, not just to those that society deems as 'special'.


All of this. There are people who serve this country without ever signing up for the military.


Tornado of Zoo Animals: That'll teach them for serving our country.


I was really hoping for a visualization of your login in your profile & am now terribly disappointed. You could maybe work on that for me? Please?
 
2012-04-24 05:38:20 PM  

taurusowner: BronyMedic: NkThrasher: /PTSD treatment should be available for anyone who needs it, not just Soldiers

Problem is that seeking mental health in many professions, from Police Officers, to Healthcare Workers, to Military, is viewed as a stigmata and weakness. There ARE services out there for these people, but the thing is, it can be a career killer to use them - especially for military.

THIS.

The biggest reason a lot of vets don't want to seek treatment of any kind, even just someone to talk to, is NOT a fear of "I'll look weak if I do". It's actually a much more realistic fear of "what opportunities will I get passed over for if I have this on my record?". It may not be anything even remotely serious or debilitating. But if having to check "yes" on the "Have you ever been seen by a mental health professional?" sort of questions on some job apps is enough to get your app shuffled to the bottom of the stack, it's not wroth seeking help.


I know for security clearances now the way bolded is phrased came with a separate sheet which stated PTSD was not considered relevant. I can't remember the exact wording on the forms now as it has been a little over three years since I reapplied for mine.
 
2012-04-24 05:41:12 PM  

TWX: cgraves67:
Indeed. I work with an Iraq vet and his dad (who also works here) and fiance are concerned that he needs PTSD treatment, but he refuses to submit to it. It's not like it isn't available to him, he just refuses to acknowledge the problem. If it takes jail time to get them to do compulsory treatment, I'm for it.

Get him a membership at the local VFW. He might be more amenable to talking about it with other soldiers over a beer.


Check out this site.
http://www.vetcenter.va.gov/
 
2012-04-24 05:41:43 PM  

The Southern Dandy: Treatment for PTSD, whether acquired as an adult on the field of battle or as a child in an abusive home, shouldn't be seen as a special benefit one earns with veteran status. It should be provided as a standard of care for ANYONE who needs it.

Veterans have earned special benefits, but basic mental health treatment shouldn't be considered a perk.


Unfortunately, if it ever becomes standard, a mental illness, whose treatment and diagnosis can be very subjective, will be a center for people milking to outright defrauding the system.
 
2012-04-24 05:42:06 PM  

tetsoushima: StaleCoffee: Cagey B: How about opening up more treatment centers for these people before they end up in jail? Or better yet, how about we focus on treating PTSD while they're still in the farking military?

Oh, right. We don't actually give a shiat beyond putting yellow ribbon magnets on shiat.

Next you're going to suggest we make sure people have access to basic health services so they stop clogging up the ER or quit giving out handicap stickers to fat people so folks without legs can park up close to the bank instead of across the lot.

I have this image in my head of a herd of quadruple-amputees running on all four stumps towards a bank entrance. There's a cowboy there, and he starts lassoing the ones at the head of the pack to divert the stampede into a liquor store. Meanwhile, there is a full orchestra playing Copland's "Hoe Down." YEEE HAW!!!

[trustedadvisor.com image 380x316]


I lol'd.
 
2012-04-24 05:42:25 PM  

Gyrfalcon: nekom: So a vet's best hope to get desperately needed treatment is to go to jail? God bless America!

I don't care, as long as they're getting the desperately needed treatment, ffs.


I'm not saying it's at all a bad thing, don't get me wrong. I'm just saying maybe this sort of treatment should be available to ALL soldiers, not just ones that wind up in a particular county jail.
 
2012-04-24 05:42:38 PM  

Jacobin: 2wolves: nekom: So a vet's best hope to get desperately needed treatment is to go to jail? God bless America!

Same with regular folks and health care.

Except that with regular folks, good luck with getting that jail house health care. The rumors that excellent or even adequate health care is routinely available for prisoners is not fact based.


Very few things that are said about prison life on Fark are fact based.
 
2012-04-24 05:42:50 PM  

StaleCoffee: Cagey B: How about opening up more treatment centers for these people before they end up in jail? Or better yet, how about we focus on treating PTSD while they're still in the farking military?

Oh, right. We don't actually give a shiat beyond putting yellow ribbon magnets on shiat.

Next you're going to suggest we make sure people have access to basic health services so they stop clogging up the ER or quit giving out handicap stickers to fat people so folks without legs can park up close to the bank instead of across the lot.


Its almost as if you have no idea what the fark you are talking about.
 
2012-04-24 05:43:28 PM  
Why isn't this normal for all people who pass through the criminal justice system?

Rehab instead of punishment.
 
2012-04-24 05:44:28 PM  

taurusowner: BronyMedic: NkThrasher: /PTSD treatment should be available for anyone who needs it, not just Soldiers

Problem is that seeking mental health in many professions, from Police Officers, to Healthcare Workers, to Military, is viewed as a stigmata and weakness. There ARE services out there for these people, but the thing is, it can be a career killer to use them - especially for military.

THIS.

The biggest reason a lot of vets don't want to seek treatment of any kind, even just someone to talk to, is NOT a fear of "I'll look weak if I do". It's actually a much more realistic fear of "what opportunities will I get passed over for if I have this on my record?". It may not be anything even remotely serious or debilitating. But if having to check "yes" on the "Have you ever been seen by a mental health professional?" sort of questions on some job apps is enough to get your app shuffled to the bottom of the stack, it's not wroth seeking help.


What the heck are you talking about.
 
2012-04-24 05:45:44 PM  
Good on him. Sure, proper health care for all veterans and proper mental care for all PTSD sufferers would be better (hell, it should be common sense), but this one guy can't exactly walk up to the White House and single-handedly rewrite all of the laws, can he? Not without being called a commie socialist class warrior by the True Patriots of the Tea Party, anyway.
 
2012-04-24 05:46:01 PM  

The Southern Dandy: Treatment for PTSD, whether acquired as an adult on the field of battle or as a child in an abusive home, shouldn't be seen as a special benefit one earns with veteran status. It should be provided as a standard of care for ANYONE who needs it.

Veterans have earned special benefits, but basic mental health treatment shouldn't be considered a perk.


This in vast amounts.
 
2012-04-24 05:47:01 PM  
Vegemite: I am pretty sure the military can.

In the military, all someone has to do is go to their NCO and say they need help. Or their unit medic. Or their healthcare clinic. However, that "help" will get you a label, that can be a career killer, and "ran out" of the ranks, as it were. That's a major reason why there is a core of silence around it.

CapeFearCadaver: Most people, LEO, military, librarian or office jockey can't afford it.

It's called EAP outside the military. If you work for a major healthcare employer, or even for anyone who gives you health insurance, they have some form of it. It's not just for alcoholism, or drug issues like many people think. The problem with it is that if you need to ask for time off, you're going to have to give them a reason why, and if anything is found in EAP, they can still fark with your career.

Police, Fire, and EMS gets what is known as a Critical Incident Stress Management debriefing. All in all, it's a farking joke of a drum circle where you talk about your feelings immediately after a bad call. They give you a card to know the signs of suicidal ideations to give your family, and send you back to the frey.
 
2012-04-24 05:47:58 PM  

nekom: Gyrfalcon: nekom: So a vet's best hope to get desperately needed treatment is to go to jail? God bless America!

I don't care, as long as they're getting the desperately needed treatment, ffs.

I'm not saying it's at all a bad thing, don't get me wrong. I'm just saying maybe this sort of treatment should be available to ALL soldiers, not just ones that wind up in a particular county jail.


It is available. See the following post:

cgraves67: Indeed. I work with an Iraq vet and his dad (who also works here) and fiance are concerned that he needs PTSD treatment, but he refuses to submit to it. It's not like it isn't available to him, he just refuses to acknowledge the problem. If it takes jail time to get them to do compulsory treatment, I'm for it.


The kicker is that the veteran needs to seek help first. The VA does a great job in treating PTSD in veterans who seek treatment.
 
2012-04-24 05:50:10 PM  

TWX: cgraves67:
Indeed. I work with an Iraq vet and his dad (who also works here) and fiance are concerned that he needs PTSD treatment, but he refuses to submit to it. It's not like it isn't available to him, he just refuses to acknowledge the problem. If it takes jail time to get them to do compulsory treatment, I'm for it.

Get him a membership at the local VFW. He might be more amenable to talking about it with other soldiers over a beer.


This is sorta my theory on why we see much more of it with Viet Nam and Sandbox vets. The guys that fought in WW1 and WW2 and Korea saw some pretty farked up stuff and went through hell. BUT... when it was over, they all had a long trip back home, not being shot at, surrounded by the guys they went thru it all with. Time to talk with peers, decompress, readjust. Tail end of Korea, Viet Nam, and the Sandbox stuff, you can be shot at today and at home for dinner with your family tomorrow - with jet transport, etc. there is none of that long decompression time, time to talk with your fellow soldiers, etc.
 
2012-04-24 05:52:23 PM  

i.r.id10t: TWX: cgraves67:
Indeed. I work with an Iraq vet and his dad (who also works here) and fiance are concerned that he needs PTSD treatment, but he refuses to submit to it. It's not like it isn't available to him, he just refuses to acknowledge the problem. If it takes jail time to get them to do compulsory treatment, I'm for it.

Get him a membership at the local VFW. He might be more amenable to talking about it with other soldiers over a beer.

This is sorta my theory on why we see much more of it with Viet Nam and Sandbox vets. The guys that fought in WW1 and WW2 and Korea saw some pretty farked up stuff and went through hell. BUT... when it was over, they all had a long trip back home, not being shot at, surrounded by the guys they went thru it all with. Time to talk with peers, decompress, readjust. Tail end of Korea, Viet Nam, and the Sandbox stuff, you can be shot at today and at home for dinner with your family tomorrow - with jet transport, etc. there is none of that long decompression time, time to talk with your fellow soldiers, etc.


You better check your hypotenuse, bro.
 
2012-04-24 05:52:29 PM  
I'm sure they were all pre-existing conditions, and thus undeserving of the military's money, which is desperately needed by billionaire executives of companies like haliburton.
 
2012-04-24 05:52:52 PM  

dittybopper: Oh, sure, it *SOUNDS* like a good thing, until you find out this is the guy the sheriff put in charge of it:

[images3.wikia.nocookie.net image 191x201]


Dr. Phil ?
 
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