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(WISHTV)   Police would like to remind people searching a major highway for money that "finders keepers" doesn't apply when the cash was stolen from a bank   (wishtv.com ) divider line
    More: Amusing, police, Indiana Department of Transportation, highways, South Bend Tribune  
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5253 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Apr 2012 at 3:36 PM (4 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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ZAZ [TotalFark]
2012-04-24 08:58:25 AM  
Do they know the serial numbers of the missing bills? It's technically possible to track them. I heard 20 years ago that the government checked serial numbers of bills sent from private banks to the federal reserve system.
 
2012-04-24 09:21:31 AM  

ZAZ: Do they know the serial numbers of the missing bills? It's technically possible to track them. I heard 20 years ago that the government checked serial numbers of bills sent from private banks to the federal reserve system.


They are in the process of manually entering each serial number into Where's George?
 
2012-04-24 12:11:02 PM  
When banks find an "abandoned" account -the same rules don't apply to them.
 
2012-04-24 12:28:05 PM  
The police aren't discouraged from lying to people you know.
 
2012-04-24 12:55:16 PM  
Who would have guessed that a member of a happily greedy and morally bankrupt industry would jump immediately to a call for honesty and civic values when they're the ones getting screwed.
 
2012-04-24 01:10:31 PM  
The fact it came from a bank isn't the issue. All found money has to be turned in.
 
2012-04-24 02:23:04 PM  
gerrymaxeyworkshop.com

"It's a thorny legal issue alright. I'll need to refer to the case of Finders v. Keepers."
 
2012-04-24 03:40:34 PM  

AbbeySomeone: The police aren't discouraged from lying to people you know.


It's a job requirement
 
2012-04-24 03:42:27 PM  

scottydoesntknow: [gerrymaxeyworkshop.com image 280x210]

"It's a thorny legal issue alright. I'll need to refer to the case of Finders v. Keepers."


Awesome reference. Gotta love Lionel J. Hutz

Wonder if he works on contignency and requires money down
 
2012-04-24 03:42:52 PM  
FTFA "Police are warning anyone who finds some cash along Interstate 94 in northern Indiana that picking it up could land them in jail."


Good luck tracing that to the original finder/keeper there Lou. If you get asked by the cops "Where did you get that $20 bill ?" your response should be "I want to speak to a lawyer"
 
2012-04-24 03:44:49 PM  

One Bad Apple: FTFA "Police are warning anyone who finds some cash along Interstate 94 in northern Indiana that picking it up could land them in jail."


Good luck tracing that to the original finder/keeper there Lou. If you get asked by the cops "Where did you get that $20 bill ?" your response should be "I want to speak to a lawyer"


Exactly what are the planning on doing? Having people empty the contents of their wallets so they can take inventory?

I know.... I know. Don't give them any ideas
 
2012-04-24 03:47:17 PM  
Its gotten to the point where you are an idiot if you believe anything a cop says.

Mind you, they can arrest you for pretty much anything these days so you're basically screwed no matter what the second that they decide to talk to you.
 
2012-04-24 03:49:46 PM  
thankfully the article has a picture of what said money looks like.
 
2012-04-24 03:50:36 PM  
Well, I wouldn't go taking stacks of bills I found into my local bank for deposit (assuming one did pick some up). If the serial numbers are within a given range, it might trigger some kind of warning and link you to it.

However, if you kept the cash at home and used it here and there, they'd never find you. So yeah, if I found some of it (don't live in the area, so I can't), I'd sure as hell hang onto it.
 
2012-04-24 03:55:25 PM  
And people who are searching a major highway for money would like to say:

"Sheeeeeeeit"

*keeps looking*
 
2012-04-24 03:57:01 PM  

akula: Well, I wouldn't go taking stacks of bills I found into my local bank for deposit (assuming one did pick some up). If the serial numbers are within a given range, it might trigger some kind of warning and link you to it.

However, if you kept the cash at home and used it here and there, they'd never find you. So yeah, if I found some of it (don't live in the area, so I can't), I'd sure as hell hang onto it.


Duh found money calls for a strip club visit!!!!!!
 
2012-04-24 04:01:49 PM  

steamingpile: akula: Well, I wouldn't go taking stacks of bills I found into my local bank for deposit (assuming one did pick some up). If the serial numbers are within a given range, it might trigger some kind of warning and link you to it.

However, if you kept the cash at home and used it here and there, they'd never find you. So yeah, if I found some of it (don't live in the area, so I can't), I'd sure as hell hang onto it.

Duh found money calls for a strip club visit!!!!!!


I like the way you think, sir.
 
2012-04-24 04:02:38 PM  

ZAZ: Do they know the serial numbers of the missing bills? It's technically possible to track them. I heard 20 years ago that the government checked serial numbers of bills sent from private banks to the federal reserve system.


Take it to Vegas, and make bets that are as close to 50/50 as you can get.  Spend a few bills at a time, and only stick around for 15-30 minutes at each table.  Cash out and move to the next casino.  Don't sign up for any cards.
 
2012-04-24 04:03:07 PM  

DROxINxTHExWIND: And people who are searching a major highway for money would like to say:

"Sheeeeeeeit"

*keeps looking*


Police say that responsible citizens have already returned 20,000 dollars from the heist. The 2,000 will be returned to the bank when the trial is over.
 
2012-04-24 04:03:34 PM  

One Bad Apple: Good luck tracing that to the original finder/keeper there Lou. If you get asked by the cops "Where did you get that $20 bill ?" your response should be "I want to speak to a lawyer" "Got it as change from the 7-11 about 10 minutes ago."


FTFY
 
2012-04-24 04:06:46 PM  

One Bad Apple: FTFA "Police are warning anyone who finds some cash along Interstate 94 in northern Indiana that picking it up could land them in jail."


Good luck tracing that to the original finder/keeper there Lou. If you get asked by the cops "Where did you get that $20 bill ?" your response should be "I want to speak to a lawyer""I got it back as change from the local Wawa when I got my morning coffee."


FTFY. Sure, you're telling a big fat lie to the police but there's no way they'd be able to disprove you. Unless you posted pics to Facebook of yourself taking the money off the highway. Then you're farked.

/If you posted them to Google+ though, you're fine...
 
2012-04-24 04:06:47 PM  

OregonVet: The fact it came from a bank isn't the issue. All found money has to be turned in.


Says you.
 
2012-04-24 04:07:16 PM  
I stumbled across a website a couple of years ago that claimed the new $20 bills had RFID tags embedded in them. The only way to disable the tag is to microwave the bill for thirty seconds.

So anyone who finds any of this money, remember to nuke the bills for thirty seconds and you'll be home free.

/serious about the story. In no way do I believe it.
 
2012-04-24 04:08:02 PM  

Because People in power are Stupid: When banks find an "abandoned" account -the same rules don't apply to them.


Last I checked, they have to turn it over to the state after a few years as unclaimed property.
 
2012-04-24 04:08:28 PM  
Only if they catch me!
 
2012-04-24 04:10:28 PM  

Pro Zack: DROxINxTHExWIND: And people who are searching a major highway for money would like to say:

"Sheeeeeeeit"

*keeps looking*

Police say that responsible citizens have already returned 20,000 dollars from the heist. The 2,000 will be returned to the bank when the trial is over.


Translation: People who were picking up money when the police cars arrived.

"Err...here you go...officer." *curses life under his breath*
 
2012-04-24 04:11:09 PM  
Any stolen property belongs to the person who it was stolen from. In addition, knowingly receiving stolen property is a crime (if you don't know, all they can do is take it back from you). Money or objects (jewelery, cars, whatever), the law is the same.

Now, does this mean that if you find the money, they will catch you? Probably not, if you are smart about it. It's still against the law, though.
 
2012-04-24 04:12:47 PM  

pedrop357: Because People in power are Stupid: When banks find an "abandoned" account -the same rules don't apply to them.

Last I checked, they have to turn it over to the state after a few years as unclaimed property.


Yes, they do. And its not just for banks. I have a list of old outstanding checks and my company cannot just void them and keep the money.
 
2012-04-24 04:13:03 PM  

Whatthefark: I stumbled across a website a couple of years ago that claimed the new $20 bills had RFID tags embedded in them. The only way to disable the tag is to microwave the bill for thirty seconds.

So anyone who finds any of this money, remember to nuke the bills for thirty seconds and you'll be home free.

/serious about the story. In no way do I believe it.


I came across some similar claims on a car modding site of all places.
Some guy who really liked camping, and had heavily modified his Ford Festiva into a small one man camper. He claimed that he had to install a hidden safe because kept getting pulled over and searched, with his vehicle getting ripped up and his money confiscated , but that the pull-overs stopped when he began wrapping his cash in foil.

Sounds like BS to me, how the hell could you sleep in a Festiva?
 
2012-04-24 04:14:58 PM  

pedrop357: Because People in power are Stupid: When banks find an "abandoned" account -the same rules don't apply to them.

Last I checked, they have to turn it over to the state after a few years as unclaimed property.


THIS! Any unclaimed funds held by a bank or other corporation can't just be pocketed. They have to be escheated to the State and then publicly listed (usually on-line) so anyone can see if they have monies owed them.
 
2012-04-24 04:16:45 PM  

Geotpf: Any stolen property belongs to the person who it was stolen from. In addition, knowingly receiving stolen property is a crime (if you don't know, all they can do is take it back from you). Money or objects (jewelery, cars, whatever), the law is the same.

Now, does this mean that if you find the money, they will catch you? Probably not, if you are smart about it. It's still against the law, though.


Golly!
 
2012-04-24 04:18:36 PM  
The rule is simple:

1) Is it stolen from people ? if yes == can't have
2) Is it stolen from a human being? if yes == can have

/Rules don't count for people
 
2012-04-24 04:35:19 PM  

Geotpf: It's still against the law, though.


So is setting one foot on property you don't have explicit permission to be on.
So is driving 1mph over the limit.
So is walking one's cow down Main Street after 1:00 PM on Sunday in Arkansas.
 
2012-04-24 04:44:42 PM  
*scoff*

Yeah, I'll respect the banks rights to their property when they respect ours.
 
2012-04-24 04:55:24 PM  

Talula Does the Hula From Hawaii: pedrop357: Because People in power are Stupid: When banks find an "abandoned" account -the same rules don't apply to them.

Last I checked, they have to turn it over to the state after a few years as unclaimed property.

THIS! Any unclaimed funds held by a bank or other corporation can't just be pocketed. They have to be escheated to the State and then publicly listed (usually on-line) so anyone can see if they have monies owed them.


hahahahah!! Oh, you're serious? Let me laugh harder.

http://consumerist.com/2012/04/how-a-10-overdraft-fee-spiraled-into-1 5 55-in-debt-to-wells-fargo.html

"In 2006, the man shut down the bike shop he'd owned for 14 years. ...he paid off the two lines of credit associated with the business and thought he'd had both those accounts closed."..."Some bills were set up for monthly auto-pay from the checking account. But when that account got down to zero, rather than have that payment bounce, the bank paid it out of one of the credit lines that he'd been led to believe were closed, and hit him with a $10 overdraft fee.
That was back in 2007, and the man says he received no statements from Wachovia or Wells Fargo until this past December."...

(TL;DR- Man pays off credit line, bank keeps it open and racks up $1,555 in fees and debt.)

http://consumerist.com/2011/06/05-balance-ends-in-149-in-fees-after-t c f-bank-wont-close-account.html
"Reader DFCL says that he asked TCF Bank to close his account back in April as it only had a $.05 balance. Now it's June, his account is still open, and he's in collections for $149 in fees."

http://consumerist.com/2011/03/zombie-wells-fargo-account-rises-from- d ead-collects-overdraft-fees.html
"Zombie Wells Fargo Account Rises From Dead, Collects Overdraft Fees"

In other words, the bank will just eat the remaining balance of any 'unclaimed accounts' with fees.
 
2012-04-24 05:14:16 PM  
"finders keepers" is a pretty freaking lousy method of dealing with ownership rights anyway.

Hey dude, I found your car! Start weeping, because now it's mine!
Hey, I found some cookies in your kitchen and I'm totally taking them home!
Hey, I found this cellphone on the ground! Score!
I found this great purse on a park bench! Isn't it awesome?
IT ISN'T CALLED FINDING, IT'S CALLED STEALING

A thing becomes yours when you are given it, earn it, or purchase it. Or if you make it, refine it, or otherwise create it. No other way.
 
2012-04-24 05:25:38 PM  
What the cops think citizens will do when told "give back that money.":
anta40.files.wordpress.com

How the citizens really react:
suptg.thisisnotatrueending.com
 
2012-04-24 05:41:00 PM  
fark that, if someone's cash blows into my yard, that's my money now. If you don't want other's taking your possessions you need to do a better job holding on to it.
 
2012-04-24 05:48:42 PM  

OregonVet: The fact it came from a bank isn't the issue. All found money has to be turned in.


So, if I find a penny on the sidewalk, I need to take that right down to the police station?

Or does it only apply to bills? That worn, ratty $1 bill needs to be handed in?

Or is it mulitple bills, like 2 one-dollar bills stuck together with a bit of chewing gum I find under some shrubbery?

Or is it over a certain quantity?

Saying every amount of money found has to be turned in is somewhere between unrealistic and naive. Yeah, it's a law on the books, but so is the speed limit. Try driving 55 MPH on most roads (or 70 on the Interstate) and see how much you get passed, sometimes with people flipping you the bird.

Realistically speaking, nobody turns in small quantities of "found" money (remember that story a few weeks back about the waitress and the found money which was kept as "drug money" without any evidence?). Most people wouldn't even turn in money in most quantities, only huge, obviously illicit amounts would get anybody I know to turn them in (bundle of bank-wrapped $100 bills, sequentially numbered? Yeah, that's a little suspicious).
 
2012-04-24 06:33:32 PM  
...unless you're a cop. They can do whatever they want.
 
2012-04-24 06:56:05 PM  

Ordinary Genius: ...unless you're a cop. They can do whatever they want.


Several years ago a Vancouver cop was walking his dog and he just happened to find a bag containing almost a million dollars. He turned it in and eventually he got to keep the cash.

"That's how I'd launder my stolen drug money if I were a cop", said half the citizens of Vancouver in unison.
 
2012-04-24 06:58:08 PM  

OregonVet: The fact it came from a bank isn't the issue. All found money has to be turned in.


Only if someone knows you have it.
 
2012-04-24 07:00:40 PM  

Silverstaff: and see how much you get passed,


The shame indeed.
 
2012-04-24 07:24:30 PM  
Of course not. It belongs to the police.

"Do you have any illegal narcotics or large amounts of money in this vehicle?"
 
2012-04-24 08:02:59 PM  

fredklein: Geotpf: It's still against the law, though.

So is setting one foot on property you don't have explicit permission to be on.
So is driving 1mph over the limit.
So is walking one's cow down Main Street after 1:00 PM on Sunday in Arkansas.


Bugs Meany's gonna walk
 
2012-04-24 08:05:24 PM  

fredklein: Geotpf: It's still against the law, though.

So is setting one foot on property you don't have explicit permission to be on.
So is driving 1mph over the limit.
So is walking one's cow down Main Street after 1:00 PM on Sunday in Arkansas.


I wouldn't refer to walking your mother home after church services in that vernacular.
 
2012-04-24 09:35:34 PM  
Error in banks favor: "Our records indicate you owe so we are taking your money and you have no say."

Error in your favor: "Touch that money and we will have you arrested for theft!"
 
2012-04-24 10:06:50 PM  

Corporate Self: Error in banks favor: "Our records indicate you owe so we are taking your money and you have no say."

Error in your favor: "Touch that money and we will have you arrested for theft!"



I prefer the Uncle Pennybanks approach:

www.blackenterprise.com
/hot like a bank heist
 
2012-04-24 10:40:07 PM  

Because People in power are Stupid: When banks find an "abandoned" account -the same rules don't apply to them.


 
2012-04-25 04:17:38 AM  
Rest assured, If I were to come across this cash, It will be returned to it's rightful owner promptly.
As soon as I spend it.
 
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