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(Chron)   Veterans returning from Afghanistan drive like everybody is out to kill them, and it shows   (chron.com) divider line 85
    More: Interesting, USAA, Afghanistan  
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9808 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Apr 2012 at 9:37 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-04-24 09:40:55 AM
Maybe losing an eye had more to do with it than any mysterious malady?
 
2012-04-24 09:43:31 AM

Turbo Cojones: Maybe losing an eye had more to do with it than any mysterious malady?


FTFA: The study, "Returning Warriors," said troops of all ranks and ages had 13 percent more at-fault accidents

thats a lot of eye injuries.
 
2012-04-24 09:44:08 AM
To be fair, everybody is out to kill them.

\ The Universe hates you
\\ Is actively trying to kill you
\\\ Will succeed
 
2012-04-24 09:45:09 AM
Seeing how this article is from a Texas outlet it made me think of an easy solution. Transition the returning soldiers into civilian driving by having them drive in any Texas border city, though I think Laredo or El Paso would be the best, for a period of time. There would still be a need for white knuckle, death's doorstep driving but the need to return gunfire would probably be reduced by about 9%. Then they could be stepped down in to less acute situations until finally they drive between Marfa and Sanderson as a final step, waving at every one as they pass.
 
2012-04-24 09:45:50 AM
I wonder how much of it has to do with the high incidence of traumatic brain injuries that are sustained by veterans of those wars.
 
2012-04-24 09:49:32 AM
Submitters' headline is depressingly accurate.
My maternal drive has been triggered and I find myself reviewing and discarding "band-aids" for these returned vets.

Could their wives or Moms drive them more often?
How does that help? That would just delay the vets readjustment to civilian driving.
Should they have a re-entry to civilian life driving course?
Well, that's insulting and possibly a civil violation of some sort. What other groups are singled out for additional drivers' ed?

I don't know. It just feels like the altered driving patterns are due to human pain. And where there is human pain the natural reaction, for most of us, is to try to alleviate that pain. But I can't see a reasonable way to do that. Every idea that pops in my head seems worse than doing nothing at all.
 
2012-04-24 09:50:41 AM
Apparently going to war turns you into a woman.

//The more you know...
 
2012-04-24 09:51:23 AM

rudemix: Seeing how this article is from a Texas outlet it made me think of an easy solution. Transition the returning soldiers into civilian driving by having them drive in any Texas border city, though I think Laredo or El Paso would be the best, for a period of time. There would still be a need for white knuckle, death's doorstep driving but the need to return gunfire would probably be reduced by about 9%. Then they could be stepped down in to less acute situations until finally they drive between Marfa and Sanderson as a final step, waving at every one as they pass.


Have you ever driven in Texas?
Send them to Austin, it's a got-damn war zone full of idiots instead of Taliban.
I get sick and farking tired of looking into my rear view mirror and seeing nothing but a brush guard from some testosterone crazed redneck in a 5 inch lift pickup truck, resplendent with TrucknutzTM, and yes, it has a Hemi, intent upon violating my rear bumper.
 
2012-04-24 09:51:47 AM
Another good reason to not buy a Toyota...
 
2012-04-24 09:51:58 AM

rudemix: Seeing how this article is from a Texas outlet it made me think of an easy solution. Transition the returning soldiers into civilian driving by having them drive in any Texas border city, though I think Laredo or El Paso would be the best, for a period of time. There would still be a need for white knuckle, death's doorstep driving but the need to return gunfire would probably be reduced by about 9%. Then they could be stepped down in to less acute situations until finally they drive between Marfa and Sanderson as a final step, waving at every one as they pass.


USAA is an insurance company. They insure people all over the country including Alaska and Hawaii. I'm not sure about U.S. territory. They insure houses and cars. They may have rental insurance, but I couldn't swear to it. Oh, and they have life insurance. I can't believe I nearly forgot the life insurance.
 
2012-04-24 09:54:17 AM

Lunaville: rudemix: Seeing how this article is from a Texas outlet it made me think of an easy solution. Transition the returning soldiers into civilian driving by having them drive in any Texas border city, though I think Laredo or El Paso would be the best, for a period of time. There would still be a need for white knuckle, death's doorstep driving but the need to return gunfire would probably be reduced by about 9%. Then they could be stepped down in to less acute situations until finally they drive between Marfa and Sanderson as a final step, waving at every one as they pass.

USAA is an insurance company. They insure people all over the country including Alaska and Hawaii. I'm not sure about U.S. territory. They insure houses and cars. They may have rental insurance, but I couldn't swear to it. Oh, and they have life insurance. I can't believe I nearly forgot the life insurance.


Que?
 
2012-04-24 09:54:23 AM
This just in: if you don't use a skill for a year, you get rusty at it.

More at 11.
 
2012-04-24 09:56:21 AM
Lunaville: USAA is an insurance company. They insure people all over the country including Alaska and Hawaii. I'm not sure about U.S. territory. They insure houses and cars. They may have rental insurance, but I couldn't swear to it. Oh, and they have life insurance. I can't believe I nearly forgot the life insurance.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but USAA is a company which specifically targets active duty and ex-military personnel and their families as their prime demographic. In fact, that's their mission statement.
 
2012-04-24 09:56:23 AM

Dictatorial_Flair: I wonder how much of it has to do with the high incidence of traumatic brain injuries that are sustained by veterans of those wars.


I thought about that too. However, I think the larger issue is the driving style practiced and committed to memory, perhaps even muscle memory, over time. The driving style that made sense in a war zone is simply not appropriate to civilian life. While I would expect TBI to make transition more difficult, I don't think TBI would need to be present to necessitate the transition itself. The transition is naturally a part of going from a war environment to a civilian environment.
 
2012-04-24 09:58:37 AM

Krieghund: This just in: if you don't use a skill for a year, you get rusty at it.

More at 11.


I drove convoys in Iraq every other day or so for 15 months.

For me, the challenge of driving at home after deployments wasn't so much an ability/skill thing, it was psychological.
 
2012-04-24 09:59:28 AM

BronyMedic: Lunaville: USAA is an insurance company. They insure people all over the country including Alaska and Hawaii. I'm not sure about U.S. territory. They insure houses and cars. They may have rental insurance, but I couldn't swear to it. Oh, and they have life insurance. I can't believe I nearly forgot the life insurance.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but USAA is a company which specifically targets active duty and ex-military personnel and their families as their prime demographic. In fact, that's their mission statement.


You are correct. At one time it was only available to officers and their children. That may have changed. I'm not sure. There are people who've never served in the military for a single day in their lives who have USAA insurance, but these people have a parent/s who served and were eligible for USAA.
 
2012-04-24 09:59:56 AM

BronyMedic: Lunaville: USAA is an insurance company. They insure people all over the country including Alaska and Hawaii. I'm not sure about U.S. territory. They insure houses and cars. They may have rental insurance, but I couldn't swear to it. Oh, and they have life insurance. I can't believe I nearly forgot the life insurance.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but USAA is a company which specifically targets active duty and ex-military personnel and their families as their prime demographic. In fact, that's their mission statement.


Yeah, USAA started as a self-insured group of military officers, then spread from there. In order to become a member, you generally need to have been in the military or be a dependent of someone who has.
 
2012-04-24 10:00:47 AM
Considering that the source is the only insurance company in the world that won't try to make bank off of a soldier's higher accident rate after a deployment, I'll welcome this news.
After doing a study of all the off-duty mishaps in the Air Force, we noticed that the period after deployment was marred by a lot of vehicle accidents, especially drunken driving. People don't realize how much less tolerance they have when they've been sober for six months straight.
Then, there's the effect of having not driven fast for a while. Outside the wire, you're almost always in a tactical vehicle, which is heavy, high and slow. Inside the wire, you're likely not driving more than 15mph, maybe 25-30 on some open parts of a large base like Bagram of KAF. Very few soldiers drive daily out there. Vehicles are few, everything inside is within walking distance, and driving outside the wire means putting yourself at risk. I've had a few near-panic moments, myself. It sucks royal nut to not be able to control that feeling.

I did learn how to be confident with a manual transmission, at least. Almost never stall one, anymore.

CSB, After my last deployment, when I was picked up at the airport to go home, my ride got going 50 down Tropicana near UNLV, and I felt like we were going near 80. The day I returned from deployment was also the last day my wife drove a car with me in it.
 
2012-04-24 10:01:48 AM
Well...they DO teach them to drive like this over there.
 
2012-04-24 10:02:30 AM

Lunaville: Dictatorial_Flair: I wonder how much of it has to do with the high incidence of traumatic brain injuries that are sustained by veterans of those wars.

I thought about that too. However, I think the larger issue is the driving style practiced and committed to memory, perhaps even muscle memory, over time. The driving style that made sense in a war zone is simply not appropriate to civilian life. While I would expect TBI to make transition more difficult, I don't think TBI would need to be present to necessitate the transition itself. The transition is naturally a part of going from a war environment to a civilian environment.


Part of it is probably driving style. I brought that up because I deal with a lot of TBI patients where I work, and they can have serious, permanent functional deficits that most people would never notice. Even years after they have mostly recovered, all but the most mild, high-functioning of patients can have serious difficulty with tasks that require sequential planning, situational awareness, and divided attention. They might be stymied by tasks like basic division, and trying to drive a car in city interstate traffic is a hell of a lot more complex than splitting one pile into six piles. I see a lot of second and third TBIs because nobody realized that Aunt Head Bonk can't actually drive safely anymore.
 
2012-04-24 10:02:40 AM
Perhaps they have the excitement of the end to the War on Terror and this is the celebration of them?
 
2012-04-24 10:05:16 AM
A friend's husband returned a couple years ago from a deployment in Iraq, driving a truck in a very dangerous area. Not long after he came back, she scolded him for not paying attention. What she took as not paying attention was actually him paying attention to everything: he knew where every coke can along the road had been, because the garbage had often had explosives in them. It was really hard for him to adjust to just paying attention to other drivers and not the trash on the shoulder.
 
2012-04-24 10:05:43 AM
I'll accept this as an excuse why the douchebag in the Land Rover didn't give me a thank-you wave when I let him in front of me this morning. Still, the next person who thinks he can bypass all the right-lane traffic and get in front of me can go eat a bag of ****s.
 
2012-04-24 10:06:43 AM

Lunaville: BronyMedic: Lunaville: USAA is an insurance company. They insure people all over the country including Alaska and Hawaii. I'm not sure about U.S. territory. They insure houses and cars. They may have rental insurance, but I couldn't swear to it. Oh, and they have life insurance. I can't believe I nearly forgot the life insurance.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but USAA is a company which specifically targets active duty and ex-military personnel and their families as their prime demographic. In fact, that's their mission statement.

You are correct. At one time it was only available to officers and their children. That may have changed. I'm not sure. There are people who've never served in the military for a single day in their lives who have USAA insurance, but these people have a parent/s who served and were eligible for USAA.


My wife was an Army brat and had USAA for a while, but she switched to mine when we got married. I, a total civilian, get junk mail from them all the fracking time. She is no longer a dependent of military personel , so why do we keep getting this crap?
 
2012-04-24 10:11:48 AM
This is just the tip of the ice berg that these guys and gals will have to adjust to. Two wars and 10 years of fighting do not make for easy transitions back to civilian life. At the same time veteran services seem to have been gutted by budget problems.
 
2012-04-24 10:13:37 AM

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: A friend's husband returned a couple years ago from a deployment in Iraq, driving a truck in a very dangerous area. Not long after he came back, she scolded him for not paying attention. What she took as not paying attention was actually him paying attention to everything: he knew where every coke can along the road had been, because the garbage had often had explosives in them. It was really hard for him to adjust to just paying attention to other drivers and not the trash on the shoulder.


This sounds like a very likely explanation. When you're trained to do something every day that is life or death, giving that up is hard.
 
2012-04-24 10:13:57 AM
It's pretty cool that the article didnt end with "So we plan on jacking up the insurance rates for deployed personnel 20% for the 6 months post-deployment."
 
2012-04-24 10:15:19 AM

cgraves67: Lunaville: BronyMedic: Lunaville: USAA is an insurance company. They insure people all over the country including Alaska and Hawaii. I'm not sure about U.S. territory. They insure houses and cars. They may have rental insurance, but I couldn't swear to it. Oh, and they have life insurance. I can't believe I nearly forgot the life insurance.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but USAA is a company which specifically targets active duty and ex-military personnel and their families as their prime demographic. In fact, that's their mission statement.

You are correct. At one time it was only available to officers and their children. That may have changed. I'm not sure. There are people who've never served in the military for a single day in their lives who have USAA insurance, but these people have a parent/s who served and were eligible for USAA.

My wife was an Army brat and had USAA for a while, but she switched to mine when we got married. I, a total civilian, get junk mail from them all the fracking time. She is no longer a dependent of military personel , so why do we keep getting this crap?


Because she's still eligible to be a member - and being one myself via my wife I would suggest you at least look in to it - they're pretty much awesome.
 
2012-04-24 10:18:06 AM

Dictatorial_Flair: Lunaville: Dictatorial_Flair: I wonder how much of it has to do with the high incidence of traumatic brain injuries that are sustained by veterans of those wars.

I thought about that too. However, I think the larger issue is the driving style practiced and committed to memory, perhaps even muscle memory, over time. The driving style that made sense in a war zone is simply not appropriate to civilian life. While I would expect TBI to make transition more difficult, I don't think TBI would need to be present to necessitate the transition itself. The transition is naturally a part of going from a war environment to a civilian environment.

Part of it is probably driving style. I brought that up because I deal with a lot of TBI patients where I work, and they can have serious, permanent functional deficits that most people would never notice. Even years after they have mostly recovered, all but the most mild, high-functioning of patients can have serious difficulty with tasks that require sequential planning, situational awareness, and divided attention. They might be stymied by tasks like basic division, and trying to drive a car in city interstate traffic is a hell of a lot more complex than splitting one pile into six piles. I see a lot of second and third TBIs because nobody realized that Aunt Head Bonk can't actually drive safely anymore.


I don't understand why there isn't more concern in our society for people with TBI. In most of our nation driving is almost tantamount to survival. If you can't drive, you can't get to work; you can't go to the grocery store; you can't make medical appointments.

What happens to people who can't remaster driving? who don't have a relative to taxi them around?

I'm tempted to say I can imagine how much these people must suffer, but that would be a lie. I can not, however much I try, truly imagine how much a returning vet with TBI suffers.

TBI is one of the reasons I oppose war in Afghanistan, Iraq, Iran, Yemen, Fill-in-Name-of-Next-Country-Here.

I think TBI and other, similar, medical conditions are excellent reasons to get serious about public transportation in this country. I have this fantasy where passenger rail cars and rail ties are built in the rust belt and then a Veterans' Work Corp builds a system of public transportation so awesome it's beauty and efficiency reduce onlookers to weeping.

I would also like to see more funding put into research on treatments for TBI. I visit my hometown. Most of the factories are gone. Even the "mall" has more spaces closed than open for business. The "jobs" consist of a sea of part-time, minimum wage, no benefits retail work. The largest tenant in the dinky mall is the U.S. military. There is a recruiter for every branch of the military.

As I see it, society has collectively allowed our civilian economy to be trashed; our jobs off-shored. We feed our children into the military and protest "Well, it's better than if he were to end up in a for-profit prison." And when these children come to harm fighting wars, in my view primarily intended to enrich investors in the military-industrial complex, we don't even want to take proper care of them. Instead, the average American shrieks "Taxes! No taxes!" Okay, maybe that is more the wealthy than the average American, but it still frustrating.
 
2012-04-24 10:18:39 AM

Maud Dib: Have you ever driven in Texas?
Send them to Austin, it's a got-damn war zone full of idiots instead of Taliban.
I get sick and farking tired of looking into my rear view mirror and seeing nothing but a brush guard from some testosterone crazed redneck in a 5 inch lift pickup truck, resplendent with TrucknutzTM, and yes, it has a Hemi, intent upon violating my rear bumper.


Funny, I found Austin to be fine for driving.

DFW, on the other hand, is the only place I felt that drivers were actively out to get me. :(
 
2012-04-24 10:18:57 AM
My last duty assignment in Germany was as a D.V. (distinguished visitor) driver. I had to attend anti-terrorist driving training.

To this day, any situation on the road that looks even a little suspicious will cause me to switch into "DV driver" mode.
 
2012-04-24 10:19:03 AM
My boyfriend was in Iraq and drives like a maniac. He has had 20 points in 18 months and has had at least 6 accidents that were above "fender-bender" status. I can't count how many fender-benders...

\DNRTFA
 
2012-04-24 10:19:05 AM

Slaves2Darkness: This is just the tip of the ice berg that these guys and gals will have to adjust to. Two wars and 10 years of fighting do not make for easy transitions back to civilian life. At the same time veteran services seem to have been gutted by budget problems.


One of my Army friends said that "Hurt Locker" was the most accurate portrayal of the psychological toll these wars are having on people. And pretty much everyone I know who has served has some level of PTSD. It's really a problem that needs to be addressed.
 
2012-04-24 10:20:15 AM

cgraves67: Lunaville: BronyMedic: Lunaville: USAA is an insurance company. They insure people all over the country including Alaska and Hawaii. I'm not sure about U.S. territory. They insure houses and cars. They may have rental insurance, but I couldn't swear to it. Oh, and they have life insurance. I can't believe I nearly forgot the life insurance.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but USAA is a company which specifically targets active duty and ex-military personnel and their families as their prime demographic. In fact, that's their mission statement.

You are correct. At one time it was only available to officers and their children. That may have changed. I'm not sure. There are people who've never served in the military for a single day in their lives who have USAA insurance, but these people have a parent/s who served and were eligible for USAA.

My wife was an Army brat and had USAA for a while, but she switched to mine when we got married. I, a total civilian, get junk mail from them all the fracking time. She is no longer a dependent of military personel , so why do we keep getting this crap?


I don't actually work for USAA. I can't answer your question.
 
2012-04-24 10:22:34 AM

Fizpez: cgraves67: Lunaville: BronyMedic: Lunaville: USAA is an insurance company. They insure people all over the country including Alaska and Hawaii. I'm not sure about U.S. territory. They insure houses and cars. They may have rental insurance, but I couldn't swear to it. Oh, and they have life insurance. I can't believe I nearly forgot the life insurance.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but USAA is a company which specifically targets active duty and ex-military personnel and their families as their prime demographic. In fact, that's their mission statement.

You are correct. At one time it was only available to officers and their children. That may have changed. I'm not sure. There are people who've never served in the military for a single day in their lives who have USAA insurance, but these people have a parent/s who served and were eligible for USAA.

My wife was an Army brat and had USAA for a while, but she switched to mine when we got married. I, a total civilian, get junk mail from them all the fracking time. She is no longer a dependent of military personel , so why do we keep getting this crap?

Because she's still eligible to be a member - and being one myself via my wife I would suggest you at least look in to it - they're pretty much awesome.


Yes, I admit that I am curious: Why did ya'll drop USAA? Compare it to what you have. The two of you may want to switch back.
 
2012-04-24 10:23:48 AM

tkil: DFW, on the other hand, is the only place I felt that drivers were actively out to get me. :(


You felt that too? I seriously thought they were really trying to kill me. It goes far beyond inattentive and considerate, I really think they were homicidal. It was terrifying.
 
2012-04-24 10:23:52 AM

PanicMan: Slaves2Darkness: This is just the tip of the ice berg that these guys and gals will have to adjust to. Two wars and 10 years of fighting do not make for easy transitions back to civilian life. At the same time veteran services seem to have been gutted by budget problems.

One of my Army friends said that "Hurt Locker" was the most accurate portrayal of the psychological toll these wars are having on people. And pretty much everyone I know who has served has some level of PTSD. It's really a problem that needs to be addressed.


Is that a book?
 
2012-04-24 10:24:30 AM
Make that INconsiderate.
 
2012-04-24 10:25:58 AM

Fizpez: It's pretty cool that the article didnt end with "So we plan on jacking up the insurance rates for deployed personnel 20% for the 6 months post-deployment."


USAA won't do that, but now that the data has been published I wonder how many auto insurance companies will make deployment cause for a rate increase?
 
2012-04-24 10:26:16 AM

Buttknuckle: My boyfriend was in Iraq and drives like a maniac. He has had 20 points in 18 months and has had at least 6 accidents that were above "fender-bender" status. I can't count how many fender-benders...

\DNRTFA


Sorry to hear that the boyfriend of you lost both eyes and part of his brain in Iraq. Good to know that USAA supports the troops through still giving him the insurance.
 
2012-04-24 10:26:34 AM

PanicMan: Slaves2Darkness: This is just the tip of the ice berg that these guys and gals will have to adjust to. Two wars and 10 years of fighting do not make for easy transitions back to civilian life. At the same time veteran services seem to have been gutted by budget problems.

One of my Army friends said that "Hurt Locker" was the most accurate portrayal of the psychological toll these wars are having on people. And pretty much everyone I know who has served has some level of PTSD. It's really a problem that needs to be addressed.


Well we could stop invading countries. But dont hold yer breath.
 
2012-04-24 10:27:10 AM

PanicMan: And pretty much everyone I know who has served has some level of PTSD. It's really a problem that needs to be addressed.


What's even scarier is the number that got no help after WWI, WWII and only a little help in the post-WWII conflicts. The numbers of people in the general population with similar issues are pretty staggering.
 
2012-04-24 10:27:38 AM

Fizpez: Because she's still eligible to be a member - and being one myself via my wife I would suggest you at least look in to it - they're pretty much awesome.


This.

I do the vast majority of my financial stuff through USAA. They are awesome.
 
2012-04-24 10:33:10 AM

Joce678: Well...they DO teach them to drive like this over there.


That probably has less to do with the training and more to do with the high probability that the driver is 18 years old.

In my hometown, a convoy of Army or National Guard trucks would drive through town about once year in the spring. They traveled right past the civilian college. That typically meant lots of young women in short skirts. It was highly entertaining.

My mother and I were often running errands in that area when they came through. One year, this one little guy was hanging out his window, turned almost 180 degrees from the front of the vehicle, staring at a co-ed. He drove right into a telephone pole. My mother scolded me for laughing at him and making him feel even more embarrassed, but she was laughing just as hard as I was.
 
2012-04-24 10:35:24 AM

orclover: PanicMan: Slaves2Darkness: This is just the tip of the ice berg that these guys and gals will have to adjust to. Two wars and 10 years of fighting do not make for easy transitions back to civilian life. At the same time veteran services seem to have been gutted by budget problems.

One of my Army friends said that "Hurt Locker" was the most accurate portrayal of the psychological toll these wars are having on people. And pretty much everyone I know who has served has some level of PTSD. It's really a problem that needs to be addressed.

Well we could stop invading countries. But dont hold yer breath.


Yes, I vote we stop invading countries.
 
2012-04-24 10:36:28 AM

Lunaville: PanicMan: Slaves2Darkness: This is just the tip of the ice berg that these guys and gals will have to adjust to. Two wars and 10 years of fighting do not make for easy transitions back to civilian life. At the same time veteran services seem to have been gutted by budget problems.

One of my Army friends said that "Hurt Locker" was the most accurate portrayal of the psychological toll these wars are having on people. And pretty much everyone I know who has served has some level of PTSD. It's really a problem that needs to be addressed.

Is that a book?


Movie. About an EOD crew. Probably a more dramatized than real life, but really shows the stress Soldiers are under. Fictional, but worth a watch.
 
2012-04-24 10:36:37 AM

The WindowLicker: Fizpez: Because she's still eligible to be a member - and being one myself via my wife I would suggest you at least look in to it - they're pretty much awesome.

This.

I do the vast majority of my financial stuff through USAA. They are awesome.


They wished to only charge me 35% more than Progressive did for the same policy so I had much of a positive impression with them. They were much more affordable than State Farm.
 
2012-04-24 10:40:18 AM

PanicMan: Lunaville: PanicMan: Slaves2Darkness: This is just the tip of the ice berg that these guys and gals will have to adjust to. Two wars and 10 years of fighting do not make for easy transitions back to civilian life. At the same time veteran services seem to have been gutted by budget problems.

One of my Army friends said that "Hurt Locker" was the most accurate portrayal of the psychological toll these wars are having on people. And pretty much everyone I know who has served has some level of PTSD. It's really a problem that needs to be addressed.

Is that a book?

Movie. About an EOD crew. Probably a more dramatized than real life, but really shows the stress Soldiers are under. Fictional, but worth a watch.


Not gonna happen. I'm a complete coward. I can barely watch the Harry Potter movies without nightmares. If anyone can recommend something to read, so I can be better informed, I'll do that.
 
2012-04-24 10:41:23 AM

Lunaville: In most of our nation driving is almost tantamount to survival. If you can't drive, you can't get to work; you can't go to the grocery store; you can't make medical appointments.


I think we are much too loose with our driver's license requirements here. However, we can't afford to be too much more strict simply because being able to drive is practically necessary due to the near nonexistence of public transportation in many places. There are a lot of people who are either physically or mentally incapable of driving safely, but we don't exclude them because they're not unsafe enough, or something.
 
2012-04-24 10:42:59 AM

Lunaville: Yes, I vote we stop invading countries.


I work for the Army and I would be perfectly happy to lose my job if it meant we stopped invading/ occupying countries and killing the locals and crippling our 20 year-olds for life, for no damn reason.
 
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