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(CNN)   Is geekiness just a sign of autism? Subby doesn't know, but would love to sit down and explain to you in minute detail the history of the Pre-Crisis DC Universe   (geekout.blogs.cnn.com) divider line 35
    More: Interesting, signs and symptoms, scientific inquiry, spectrum disorders, Flagstaff, DSM, Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, autism spectrum, mental health professional  
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1199 clicks; posted to Geek » on 24 Apr 2012 at 9:58 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



35 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2012-04-24 10:03:38 AM
Yes, there's a strong connection. Few people without some autistic traits can focus well enough to achieve true geekdom.
 
2012-04-24 10:04:54 AM
Autism spectrum issues are primarily an excuse for poorly socialized people of a certain disposition to not socialize.
I say this as a poster boy for poorly socialized individuals.
 
2012-04-24 10:17:42 AM
I really think it depends on how people go about their geekiness.

If you spend hours on end playing a shooter is probably a bit different than if you spend hours editing every minute detail of your character's inventory.

I'm not saying certain games are only for people with autism, but you have to admit that some games definitely have content that "feeds" OCD-like behavior. I have a friend with autism and when he gets a new game, it's painful to watch him. He needs to spend at least an hour just messing with the options to get everything "right".
 
2012-04-24 10:26:14 AM
If we are going to go into minute detail over anything from DC it should be over hawkman and his various back stories and retcons. What a nightmare.
 
2012-04-24 10:27:44 AM
It would take a lot more than a minute to describe the history of the DC universe, Pre- or Post-Crisis.

/pet peeve
 
2012-04-24 10:27:45 AM

Girl Pants: I really think it depends on how people go about their geekiness.

If you spend hours on end playing a shooter is probably a bit different than if you spend hours editing every minute detail of your character's inventory.

I'm not saying certain games are only for people with autism, but you have to admit that some games definitely have content that "feeds" OCD-like behavior. I have a friend with autism and when he gets a new game, it's painful to watch him. He needs to spend at least an hour just messing with the options to get everything "right".


You're a cool geek. amirite.
 
2012-04-24 10:34:51 AM

likefunbutnot: Autism spectrum issues are primarily an excuse for poorly socialized people of a certain disposition to not socialize.
I say this as a poster boy for poorly socialized individuals.


Or it could be a poor reason to equate a certain disposition in character to a difficult to understand condition. In doing that, they minimize the condition and give a small mock to the disposition. Making geek = Aspie diminishes Autism, creating more of a "stop being that way, just try to be normal" attitude. At the same time, it turns a certain worldview and culture into nothing more than a medical diagnosis.

Maybe I'm not expressing it correctly, but it seems a disservice to those with Autism to lump every non-standard behavior in with it. Like someone wanting to lose weight claiming to be "gluten sensitive", you're co-opting a term with real meaning.

I wonder why our society feels the need to quantify everyone's behaviors into neat and manageable categories.
 
2012-04-24 10:41:01 AM

Girl Pants: I really think it depends on how people go about their geekiness.

If you spend hours on end playing a shooter is probably a bit different than if you spend hours editing every minute detail of your character's inventory.


That's something else I wonder about it. Why does spending time on a shooter not worthy of a term like OCD? Or someone who has encyclopedic knowledge of sports, or is really, really, really into their religion and theology? Is it because some are more socially acceptable than others? Is the rabbinical student who obsesses over Midrash so different from a Trekkie/Trekker?
 
2012-04-24 10:43:19 AM

Duck_of_Doom: Girl Pants: I really think it depends on how people go about their geekiness.

If you spend hours on end playing a shooter is probably a bit different than if you spend hours editing every minute detail of your character's inventory.

That's something else I wonder about it. Why does spending time on a shooter not worthy of a term like OCD? Or someone who has encyclopedic knowledge of sports, or is really, really, really into their religion and theology? Is it because some are more socially acceptable than others? Is the rabbinical student who obsesses over Midrash so different from a Trekkie/Trekker?


ghobe'
 
2012-04-24 10:48:39 AM

Duck_of_Doom: Girl Pants: I really think it depends on how people go about their geekiness.

If you spend hours on end playing a shooter is probably a bit different than if you spend hours editing every minute detail of your character's inventory.

That's something else I wonder about it. Why does spending time on a shooter not worthy of a term like OCD? Or someone who has encyclopedic knowledge of sports, or is really, really, really into their religion and theology? Is it because some are more socially acceptable than others? Is the rabbinical student who obsesses over Midrash so different from a Trekkie/Trekker?


Well, they're both obsessing over fictional material.
 
2012-04-24 11:02:14 AM
Wait, you mean nobody here wants to talk about the pre-crisis DC Universe?

upload.wikimedia.org

Damn. I'm definitely not wearing my underwear.

Time for Wapner.
 
2012-04-24 11:03:11 AM
@subby new title "Reading fark means you're autistic"
 
2012-04-24 11:03:54 AM
Some people are not wired to sit around and mindlessly chatter with others all day long. Christ, get over it. Can I give a diagnosis of "verbally-focused non-intellectual" to all those people who ruin my day by blabbing about nothing constantly? After all, I wouldn't want them to feel left out of the loop, where we all get to have some disorder.
 
2012-04-24 11:07:12 AM
Go on....

/Though I am no longer talking to DC
 
2012-04-24 11:12:15 AM

Duck_of_Doom: "stop being that way, just try to be normal"


Saying that to a person who truly has autism is like saying to someone with a broken leg "Just walk properly, everyone else manages to walk ok, why can`t you?"
 
2012-04-24 11:17:16 AM

cryinoutloud: Can I give a diagnosis of "verbally-focused non-intellectual" to all those people who ruin my day by blabbing about nothing constantly?


There are shorter medical terms that apply to those people. Idiots. Morons. Imbeciles.

All real medical labels covering mental ages from birth to 12.
 
2012-04-24 11:20:18 AM
*sits down*

Start talking Subby.
 
2012-04-24 11:21:32 AM

likefunbutnot: Autism spectrum issues are primarily an excuse for poorly socialized people of a certain disposition to not socialize.
I say this as a poster boy for poorly socialized individuals.


There is a huge difference between poorly socialized and autism. I was poorly socialized as a kid and could have easily been diagnosed as an aspie.

The key difference: while it took a bit of work on my part I learned how to be social in middle school and it became easy and natural for me.

For my brother it'll never be easy or natural, noisy places are hell for him and he has to keep practicing social skills and even then it's very difficult for him. Trying to have him understand the nuances of social interaction is like describing the color blue to someone who is blind.

/stop trying to stuff everyone into the same box
 
2012-04-24 11:53:41 AM

Tyrone Slothrop: Duck_of_Doom: Girl Pants: I really think it depends on how people go about their geekiness.

If you spend hours on end playing a shooter is probably a bit different than if you spend hours editing every minute detail of your character's inventory.

That's something else I wonder about it. Why does spending time on a shooter not worthy of a term like OCD? Or someone who has encyclopedic knowledge of sports, or is really, really, really into their religion and theology? Is it because some are more socially acceptable than others? Is the rabbinical student who obsesses over Midrash so different from a Trekkie/Trekker?

Well, they're both obsessing over fictional material.


webspace.ship.edu
 
2012-04-24 12:02:02 PM

Duck_of_Doom: That's something else I wonder about it. Why does spending time on a shooter not worthy of a term like OCD? Or someone who has encyclopedic knowledge of sports, or is really, really, really into their religion and theology? Is it because some are more socially acceptable than others? Is the rabbinical student who obsesses over Midrash so different from a Trekkie/Trekker?


Showing a really good memory, like someone who can throw random movie quotes of any movie they've seen into conversations, usually show those individuals have the markers that OCD shares. So is autism just extreme concentration like a really good memory is just part of a socially accepted OCD trait?
 
2012-04-24 12:06:22 PM

pkellmey: Duck_of_Doom: That's something else I wonder about it. Why does spending time on a shooter not worthy of a term like OCD? Or someone who has encyclopedic knowledge of sports, or is really, really, really into their religion and theology? Is it because some are more socially acceptable than others? Is the rabbinical student who obsesses over Midrash so different from a Trekkie/Trekker?

Showing a really good memory, like someone who can throw random movie quotes of any movie they've seen into conversations, usually show those individuals have the markers that OCD shares. So is autism just extreme concentration like a really good memory is just part of a socially accepted OCD trait?


Poor wording, something more along the line of "So is extreme concentration just a trait of autism like a really good memory is just part of a socially accepted OCD trait?
 
2012-04-24 12:30:50 PM

pkellmey: pkellmey: Duck_of_Doom: That's something else I wonder about it. Why does spending time on a shooter not worthy of a term like OCD? Or someone who has encyclopedic knowledge of sports, or is really, really, really into their religion and theology? Is it because some are more socially acceptable than others? Is the rabbinical student who obsesses over Midrash so different from a Trekkie/Trekker?

Showing a really good memory, like someone who can throw random movie quotes of any movie they've seen into conversations, usually show those individuals have the markers that OCD shares. So is autism just extreme concentration like a really good memory is just part of a socially accepted OCD trait?

Poor wording, something more along the line of "So is extreme concentration just a trait of autism like a really good memory is just part of a socially accepted OCD trait?


You might went to reread what the symptoms and traits of OCD are.
 
2012-04-24 12:46:23 PM
shortymac There is a huge difference between poorly socialized and autism.

Exactly.

/stop trying to stuff everyone into the same box

I don't think it is the same box, but that everyone has to go into a box in order to be understood or accepted. If you straddle boxes or don't fit into a right, proper box, then there is stigmatism, or the need to hammer someone into a box (giggity!).

pkellmeyPoor wording, something more along the line of "So is extreme concentration just a trait of autism like a really good memory is just part of a socially accepted OCD trait?

You may be right. There are socially acceptable manifestations of OCD traits - and there are career paths that encourage that behavior (accounting, for example). But to take one quirk of culture and apply medical or psychological diagnosis to it, again as if it's wrong and needs fixing (just IMO) burns my biscuits.
 
2012-04-24 12:47:26 PM

Duck_of_Doom:
Or it could be a poor reason to equate a certain disposition in character to a difficult to understand condition. In doing that, they minimize the condition and give a small mock to the disposition. Making geek = Aspie diminishes Autism, creating more of a "stop being that way, just try to be normal" attitude. At the same time, it turns a certain worldview and culture into nothing more than a medical diagnosis.


No shiat. The number of "shiny aspies" I want to punch in the throat grows every damn day. Here's a hint, folks. You being obsessed with a video game doesn't make you autistic. Being obsessed with automatic sliding doors or oven mitts might. And by "obsessed" I don't mean "Oh I really dig oven mitts" I mean "I can not function if I do not have an oven mitt around and will disrupt the rest of my day until I can satisfy that need."

And if you're capable of getting on Fark and talking about it, you sure as shiat ain't disabled.
 
2012-04-24 01:05:16 PM
Were the Charlton characters on Earth-4 pre-Crisis?
 
2012-04-24 02:28:36 PM

pkellmey: Duck_of_Doom: That's something else I wonder about it. Why does spending time on a shooter not worthy of a term like OCD? Or someone who has encyclopedic knowledge of sports, or is really, really, really into their religion and theology? Is it because some are more socially acceptable than others? Is the rabbinical student who obsesses over Midrash so different from a Trekkie/Trekker?

Showing a really good memory, like someone who can throw random movie quotes of any movie they've seen into conversations, usually show those individuals have the markers that OCD shares. So is autism just extreme concentration like a really good memory is just part of a socially accepted OCD trait?


Can you sit still in a classroom for 6-8 hours?
 
2012-04-24 03:03:30 PM

ClamsGotLegs: Were the Charlton characters on Earth-4 pre-Crisis?


Yes.

However, that earth didn't first appear until the Crisis maxiseries, since DC didn't nail down the rights to the characters until shortly before Crisis. So I don't think it counts.
 
2012-04-24 03:37:10 PM

Gergesa: If we are going to go into minute detail over anything from DC it should be over hawkman and his various back stories and retcons. What a nightmare.


...and what's the deal with Power Girl?
 
2012-04-24 03:38:22 PM

Duck_of_Doom: shortymac There is a huge difference between poorly socialized and autism.

Exactly.

/stop trying to stuff everyone into the same box

I don't think it is the same box, but that everyone has to go into a box in order to be understood or accepted. If you straddle boxes or don't fit into a right, proper box, then there is stigmatism, or the need to hammer someone into a box (giggity!).

You may be right. There are socially acceptable manifestations of OCD traits - and there are career paths that encourage that behavior (accounting, for example). But to take one quirk of culture and apply medical or psychological diagnosis to it, again as if it's wrong and needs fixing (just IMO) burns my biscuits.


That might be a better way of looking at it, but over the past 20 years I feel we're taking away the boxes.

A kid who is hyper is now add
A shy person is now socially anxious.
A neat person is OCD.
A nerd is now an aspie.

It just waters down those diagnosis and I feel we are making rather normal or quirky behavior a disease.
 
2012-04-24 03:41:23 PM
CNN reporting and childlike over-simplification: Is there a connection?
 
2012-04-24 05:23:14 PM

shortymac:
That might be a better way of looking at it, but over the past 20 years I feel we're taking away the boxes.

A kid who is hyper is now add
A shy person is now socially anxious.
A neat person is OCD.
A nerd is now an aspie.


From a public perception standpoint it does, but the diagnostic criteria haven't changed all that much. Lots and lots of doctors make stupid diagnoses not based on the DSM, too.

For example... Asperger's looks like this in the DSM

(I) Qualitative impairment in social interaction, as manifested by at least two of the following:
(A) marked impairments in the use of multiple nonverbal behaviors such as eye-to-eye gaze, facial expression, body posture, and gestures to regulate social interaction
(B) failure to develop peer relationships appropriate to developmental level
(C) a lack of spontaneous seeking to share enjoyment, interest or achievements with other people, (e.g.. by a lack of showing, bringing, or pointing out objects of interest to other people)
(D) lack of social or emotional reciprocity
(II) Restricted repetitive & stereotyped patterns of behavior, interests and activities, as manifested by at least one of the following:
(A) encompassing preoccupation with one or more stereotyped and restricted patterns of interest that is abnormal either in intensity or focus
(B) apparently inflexible adherence to specific, nonfunctional routines or rituals
(C) stereotyped and repetitive motor mannerisms (e.g. hand or finger flapping or twisting, or complex whole-body movements)
(D) persistent preoccupation with parts of objects

(III) The disturbance causes clinically significant impairments in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.

(IV) There is no clinically significant general delay in language (E.G. single words used by age 2 years, communicative phrases used by age 3 years)

(V) There is no clinically significant delay in cognitive development or in the development of age-appropriate self help skills, adaptive behavior (other than in social interaction) and curiosity about the environment in childhood.


Every snowflake on the planet and a vast majority of physicians focus almost exclusively on one of the functions of 1, ignore the "qualitative impairment" part, and ignore section II outright or if they don't, they ignore the "abnormal in intensity and focus" aspect.

So it's not so much that the criteria have broadened, it's just that we are ignoring what the criteria are, so we can all be snowflakes, too.
 
2012-04-24 05:55:59 PM
Autism is just a sign of geekiness, not the other way around.
 
2012-04-25 11:10:08 AM

Rent Party: Duck_of_Doom:
Or it could be a poor reason to equate a certain disposition in character to a difficult to understand condition. In doing that, they minimize the condition and give a small mock to the disposition. Making geek = Aspie diminishes Autism, creating more of a "stop being that way, just try to be normal" attitude. At the same time, it turns a certain worldview and culture into nothing more than a medical diagnosis.

No shiat. The number of "shiny aspies" I want to punch in the throat grows every damn day. Here's a hint, folks. You being obsessed with a video game doesn't make you autistic. Being obsessed with automatic sliding doors or oven mitts might. And by "obsessed" I don't mean "Oh I really dig oven mitts" I mean "I can not function if I do not have an oven mitt around and will disrupt the rest of my day until I can satisfy that need."

And if you're capable of getting on Fark and talking about it, you sure as shiat ain't disabled.


So I guess people with missing limbs aren't disabled if they use voice commands to browse and post on fark now? Why do people with mental disabilities get shiat on, but those with physical ones given a free pass from this sort of verbal bile you spew?
 
2012-04-25 01:21:58 PM

Pichu0102: Why do people with mental disabilities get shiat on, but those with physical ones given a free pass from this sort of verbal bile you spew?


They don't. Self centered naval gazers that think they have a very special disability get shiat on because they are self centered naval gazers taking up valuable resources from genuinely disabled people that could actually use the help.
 
2012-04-25 05:27:15 PM

Rent Party: Pichu0102: Why do people with mental disabilities get shiat on, but those with physical ones given a free pass from this sort of verbal bile you spew?

They don't. Self centered naval gazers that think they have a very special disability get shiat on because they are self centered naval gazers taking up valuable resources from genuinely disabled people that could actually use the help.


I'm gonna go ahead and agree with Rent Party... I don't think it needs to be restated.

Related note: I saw not too long ago it was Mental Disability Day or something, and we were to look around and realize that fully 1/3 of the population has some sort of mental illness. That gave me pause. What happens when it's half? Or slightly more? Will we have a "Slipped Through the Cracks of Overdiagnosis and Redefinition and Misuse Day"?
 
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