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(Vulture)   "Game of Thrones" has a kid problem. And it's not just you wanting to punch Joffrey   (vulture.com) divider line 333
    More: Obvious, Westeros, Ned Stark  
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13123 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 24 Apr 2012 at 1:00 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-04-24 04:34:07 PM

tlchwi02: they're both amoral sociopaths, but i see Roose as more of a Stalin and less of a Dahmer like Ramsay.


I can agree with that. Roose is ruthless and cruel to be sure. Ramsay is just flat out crazy. Given the choice between a fat estate to lord over peacefully and a dark room with a slave and a knife and he'd take the latter all day long.
 
2012-04-24 04:37:44 PM

Cymbal: Not to mention the "Faceless Men", who can change their appearance at will and who have been around for hundreds of years.


That ain't magic.

The birth of the Dragons enhanced the magic power all over the world. That doesn't mean there was none before they were hatched.
 
2012-04-24 04:37:52 PM

DamnYankees: I haven't read ahead in the books, but would it really be a problem to just say that the plot of the series takes place over 6-7 years? The show seems to move at such a slow pace anyway, I don't see how this would be that bad to do. Is there something which happens in book 5 or so which *requires* Arya or Bran to be prepubescent or something?

Please don't spoil specific things which happen in the books.


No it wouldn't. Martin has been pretty upfront that the chronology of the story is actually longer than most fans realize, that there are frequently large time gaps between chapters, and that some chapters that most fans think take place over the course of days actually take place over the course of weeks or months. There's plenty of temporal wiggle-room in the series.
 
2012-04-24 04:38:24 PM

Cymbal: saw magic in the very first scene of the TV/Book series, before the dragons were hatched. I think we can all agree white walkers and wights are inherently magical as they seem to defy normal laws of nature. Not to mention the "Faceless Men", who can change their appearance at will and who have been around for hundreds of years.


Actually the rebirth of Dragons has resparked magic very clearly. North of the wall (where the others and Wights are)has always been an exception to that but magic has been demonstrated to be getting more powerful since the comet appeared (which was the day the Dragons were born)

It never entirely left but was very weak since the death of the last dragon centuries before.
 
2012-04-24 04:39:50 PM

alwaysjaded: Yea really. How many wives do you know that would be "Let's go get my brother that you've been crowning every night and let's see if he can get you going enough to put a baby in me."


We'll considering she gets to Queen of an entire continent out of the deal and assuming Renly doesn't mind her having a side amusement or two, it isn't a bad deal for her.

Beside pretty much all the Kings had whores on the side, a lot of the nobles do, so really having Renly and your brother in a stable relationship is better than a lot of other women have at the time.
 
2012-04-24 04:48:29 PM

JohnBigBootay: tlchwi02: they're both amoral sociopaths, but i see Roose as more of a Stalin and less of a Dahmer like Ramsay.

I can agree with that. Roose is ruthless and cruel to be sure. Ramsay is just flat out crazy. Given the choice between a fat estate to lord over peacefully and a dark room with a slave and a knife and he'd take the latter all day long.


Roose is a sociopath, Ramsay is a psychopath
 
2012-04-24 04:49:40 PM

Digitalstrange: Cymbal: saw magic in the very first scene of the TV/Book series, before the dragons were hatched. I think we can all agree white walkers and wights are inherently magical as they seem to defy normal laws of nature. Not to mention the "Faceless Men", who can change their appearance at will and who have been around for hundreds of years.

Actually the rebirth of Dragons has resparked magic very clearly. North of the wall (where the others and Wights are)has always been an exception to that but magic has been demonstrated to be getting more powerful since the comet appeared (which was the day the Dragons were born)

It never entirely left but was very weak since the death of the last dragon centuries before.



From what I've seen in the series so far it seems to be the onset of winter which does it. Since the next winter cycle is about to begin, and magic is stronger during winters, I was assuming that the fact that winter was about to begin was why the dragons ended up being birthed from the eggs - along with a fortuitous bath in fire with their fireproof dummy of a mom.
 
2012-04-24 04:50:12 PM
In the real world, kings were always siring bastards, which caused no end of trouble when a monarch died without a clearly delineated heir.
 
2012-04-24 04:53:57 PM

mongbiohazard: ...and magic is stronger during winters...


I don't know where you're getting this. Many winters have come and gone without the kind of rebirth of magic the world is seeing at this point in the series. If magic flared with every winter, then it wouldn't be such a surprise to everyone that production of wildfire is way up and the Red Priests are pulling off stunts no one has seen in centuries.
 
2012-04-24 04:54:05 PM

nopokerface: Cymbal: Not to mention the "Faceless Men", who can change their appearance at will and who have been around for hundreds of years.

That ain't magic.

The birth of the Dragons enhanced the magic power all over the world. That doesn't mean there was none before they were hatched.


Explain to me how being able to alter your face to such a degree so that you look like a completely different person is not magical. It is certainly not natural for humans to be able to do that.

I agree that magic was enhanced at the same time as the dragon hatch, but it very well could be caused by the comet, or something else.
 
2012-04-24 04:56:11 PM

Cymbal: Explain to me how being able to alter your face to such a degree so that you look like a completely different person is not magical. It is certainly not natural for humans to be able to do that.


It's in the books, I don't want to spoil it.
 
2012-04-24 04:57:18 PM

JohnBigBootay: I can agree with that. Roose is ruthless and cruel to be sure. Ramsay is just flat out crazy. Given the choice between a fat estate to lord over peacefully and a dark room with a slave and a knife and he'd take the latter all day long.


part of it is clearly how they were brought up. Roose was the son of a lord, who was monitored, mentored, taught and surrounded always by lots of normal people. He would have quickly learned to subvert his outward and more intense sociopathic behavior (the type of "setting the neighbors cat on fire" behavior that is considered the hallmark of a budding serial killer) because the people around him would have been disturbed. Sociopaths are good at picking up on that sort of behavior and faking it for their own purposes.He seems to have channeled that into his ongoing efforts to make himself the dominate and unassailble lord in the north when the war ends.

his son on the other hand was not given the company of normal humans, but was given his bizarre youthful companion. he was generally isolated but was also protected from the full possible outcomes of his actions by his absent father. That's a pretty strong mixture for someone without normal human empathy.
 
2012-04-24 05:12:00 PM

Fish in a Barrel: Farking Canuck: It is just that the character is not half as smart as she thinks she is. She destroys long term Lannister relationships for short term gains. And the gains are very questionable as they are all based on her paranoia.

She's not just paranoid, she's also insecure. She hates anyone who questions her in even the smallest detail. The combination means that she drives away anyone of competence with the tools she needs to reign. The end result is that she is surrounded by useless sycophants who pose no direct thread to her, but who constantly undermine her with their incompetence.


You also have to remember she has power, but being a woman was never taught how to use it. (other than seduction and poisoning). She also isn't privy to her father's counsels, etc but is trying to act ruthless like him.

Tywin was merely going to marry her off while Jaime and Tyrion got educated by a maester and fighting skills. When cersei makes a bargin with the faith she doesn't realize why it is a bad idea, but Jaime does.

She also gets very paranoid considering the events in book 3 which clouds her decisions.

She talks a lot on her inequality and she is a textbook example on penis envy. Sometimes I think you have to be a chick to get her.
 
2012-04-24 05:13:31 PM

shortymac: privy to her father


clever
 
2012-04-24 05:29:17 PM

mongbiohazard: Digitalstrange: Cymbal: saw magic in the very first scene of the TV/Book series, before the dragons were hatched. I think we can all agree white walkers and wights are inherently magical as they seem to defy normal laws of nature. Not to mention the "Faceless Men", who can change their appearance at will and who have been around for hundreds of years.

Actually the rebirth of Dragons has resparked magic very clearly. North of the wall (where the others and Wights are)has always been an exception to that but magic has been demonstrated to be getting more powerful since the comet appeared (which was the day the Dragons were born)

It never entirely left but was very weak since the death of the last dragon centuries before.


From what I've seen in the series so far it seems to be the onset of winter which does it. Since the next winter cycle is about to begin, and magic is stronger during winters, I was assuming that the fact that winter was about to begin was why the dragons ended up being birthed from the eggs - along with a fortuitous bath in fire with their fireproof dummy of a mom.


GRRM has said the long seasons are caused by magic not that they are the cause of it. Magic he said is supposed to be "magical" and unexplainable so its unlikely we'll ever get a definitive answer what brought it back. He does however hint that and event about 16 years ago had a major affect on the world.
 
2012-04-24 05:31:22 PM

tlchwi02: That's a pretty strong mixture for someone without normal human empathy.


Agreed. I really loathe that character more than anyone else in the books. Probably because we get such a detailed view from the mind of the guy he destroyed.
 
2012-04-24 05:36:34 PM

Subdue their bellies: On a personal note, I'm eager for the return of Rickon and Shaggydog in the books. You just know he's going to come back a raging axe-wielding berserker bada$$.


LOL
and then get killed the first time he swings the axe
FFS, I have given up on having a favorite character. they will just die.
 
2012-04-24 05:37:43 PM

knightofargh: I'm quite aware. Didn't make the book less of a wasteland of plodding prose.


so why bother?
there are over a million other books which you could have read instead? why read something which you know was bloated prose? and then complain later? this is why I dont read stephen king or the bible. tl;dr
 
2012-04-24 05:38:50 PM

shortymac: Fish in a Barrel: Farking Canuck: It is just that the character is not half as smart as she thinks she is. She destroys long term Lannister relationships for short term gains. And the gains are very questionable as they are all based on her paranoia.

She's not just paranoid, she's also insecure. She hates anyone who questions her in even the smallest detail. The combination means that she drives away anyone of competence with the tools she needs to reign. The end result is that she is surrounded by useless sycophants who pose no direct thread to her, but who constantly undermine her with their incompetence.

You also have to remember she has power, but being a woman was never taught how to use it. (other than seduction and poisoning). She also isn't privy to her father's counsels, etc but is trying to act ruthless like him.

Tywin was merely going to marry her off while Jaime and Tyrion got educated by a maester and fighting skills. When cersei makes a bargin with the faith she doesn't realize why it is a bad idea, but Jaime does.

She also gets very paranoid considering the events in book 3 which clouds her decisions.

She talks a lot on her inequality and she is a textbook example on penis envy. Sometimes I think you have to be a chick to get her.


Most of the women are pretty batshait irrational in the book. The most stark example being Catelyn. I mean, my god woman, take 5 seconds and think about the larger consequences of your actions....

One thing I do like about the series compared to the book is their portrayal of Margery Tyrell. She was almost a side character in the book and there wasn't enough elaboration on her to really tell you whether she was involved in anything. I suppose that's what Martin was aiming for -- the audience suspected Margery just as Cersei but didn't really know whether she was a mastermind or not.

In the series, they spell it out pretty flatly that she's cunning and plotting. And while that's brilliantly portrayed and acted, it kinda takes away a bit from the mystery that exists in the book.
 
2012-04-24 05:42:37 PM

Heron: DamnYankees: I haven't read ahead in the books, but would it really be a problem to just say that the plot of the series takes place over 6-7 years? The show seems to move at such a slow pace anyway, I don't see how this would be that bad to do. Is there something which happens in book 5 or so which *requires* Arya or Bran to be prepubescent or something?

Please don't spoil specific things which happen in the books.

No it wouldn't. Martin has been pretty upfront that the chronology of the story is actually longer than most fans realize, that there are frequently large time gaps between chapters, and that some chapters that most fans think take place over the course of days actually take place over the course of weeks or months. There's plenty of temporal wiggle-room in the series.


Yes but there are some clear markers in the story -- Sansa's 17th birthday, for instance -- which can only be explained away by saying their "years" are different than Earth's. But then again, if that were true, age 17 would be like age 9 in modern metrics.

There's also the matter of Sansa's pubescent developments and their discussions of her "coming of age" at the beginning of the story. So there's a pretty good gauge that the story thus far is no longer than 3-4 years at most and likely less than that.

Who knew girl-fluid would be such a useful gauge of time.
 
2012-04-24 05:43:21 PM

mongbiohazard: Digitalstrange: Cymbal: saw magic in the very first scene of the TV/Book series, before the dragons were hatched. I think we can all agree white walkers and wights are inherently magical as they seem to defy normal laws of nature. Not to mention the "Faceless Men", who can change their appearance at will and who have been around for hundreds of years.

Actually the rebirth of Dragons has resparked magic very clearly. North of the wall (where the others and Wights are)has always been an exception to that but magic has been demonstrated to be getting more powerful since the comet appeared (which was the day the Dragons were born)

It never entirely left but was very weak since the death of the last dragon centuries before.


From what I've seen in the series so far it seems to be the onset of winter which does it. Since the next winter cycle is about to begin, and magic is stronger during winters, I was assuming that the fact that winter was about to begin was why the dragons ended up being birthed from the eggs - along with a fortuitous bath in fire with their fireproof dummy of a mom.


Ummmm, no. The books don't bear that out at all. Winters have come and gone a dozen times since the last dragons died without any enhanced magic. The comet was merely a herald of the dragons rebirth (in spite of what Melisandre believes)
 
2012-04-24 05:46:08 PM

Jake Havechek: In the real world, kings were always siring bastards, which caused no end of trouble when a monarch died without a clearly delineated heir.


In this one too, thats why Cersei is rounding up and killing Roberts bastards. Just because she is vicious and paranoid doesnt mean everything shes done is wrong.
 
2012-04-24 05:48:08 PM

imgod2u: Heron: DamnYankees: I haven't read ahead in the books, but would it really be a problem to just say that the plot of the series takes place over 6-7 years? The show seems to move at such a slow pace anyway, I don't see how this would be that bad to do. Is there something which happens in book 5 or so which *requires* Arya or Bran to be prepubescent or something?

Please don't spoil specific things which happen in the books.

No it wouldn't. Martin has been pretty upfront that the chronology of the story is actually longer than most fans realize, that there are frequently large time gaps between chapters, and that some chapters that most fans think take place over the course of days actually take place over the course of weeks or months. There's plenty of temporal wiggle-room in the series.

Yes but there are some clear markers in the story -- Sansa's 17th birthday, for instance -- which can only be explained away by saying their "years" are different than Earth's. But then again, if that were true, age 17 would be like age 9 in modern metrics.

There's also the matter of Sansa's pubescent developments and their discussions of her "coming of age" at the beginning of the story. So there's a pretty good gauge that the story thus far is no longer than 3-4 years at most and likely less than that.

Who knew girl-fluid would be such a useful gauge of time.


The characters in the book and movie are intentionally different ages. Dany is 13 in the book and 18 in the show Sansa and Arya have been aged up 2 years
 
2012-04-24 05:50:44 PM

Carth: GRRM has said the long seasons are caused by magic not that they are the cause of it. Magic he said is supposed to be "magical" and unexplainable so its unlikely we'll ever get a definitive answer what brought it back. He does however hint that and event about 16 years ago had a major affect on the world.



You know, I actually rather like that.
 
2012-04-24 05:50:57 PM

mongbiohazard: Digitalstrange: Cymbal: saw magic in the very first scene of the TV/Book series, before the dragons were hatched. I think we can all agree white walkers and wights are inherently magical as they seem to defy normal laws of nature. Not to mention the "Faceless Men", who can change their appearance at will and who have been around for hundreds of years.

Actually the rebirth of Dragons has resparked magic very clearly. North of the wall (where the others and Wights are)has always been an exception to that but magic has been demonstrated to be getting more powerful since the comet appeared (which was the day the Dragons were born)

It never entirely left but was very weak since the death of the last dragon centuries before.


From what I've seen in the series so far it seems to be the onset of winter which does it. Since the next winter cycle is about to begin, and magic is stronger during winters, I was assuming that the fact that winter was about to begin was why the dragons ended up being birthed from the eggs - along with a fortuitous bath in fire with their fireproof dummy of a mom.


Life pays for death. Kahl Drogo was in that fire as well.
 
2012-04-24 05:53:05 PM

Cymbal: badlife: A question about Winter/Summer. Since our years come from the changing of the seasons, how exactly do they measure a year in Westeros? Do they have something that shows them the start position of their planet around their sun, so they know when a year has passed?

Also, as my limited knowledge leads me to believe, in Summer there is no magic, in Winter there is magic, so all of the young folk have never seen magic, especially since the last winter was extremely short and the white walkers never came around.

*** possible spoilers ***
The last time the white walkers were mentioned in the books at Castle Black (the wall) was an entry from over 80 years prior

I always interpreted the seasons as more or less the equivalent of Earth's ice ages. Though obviously not as severe or as long lasting as our ice ages.

And no, magic exists independently of season.


-----This reply of mine is all kinds of lousy with spoilers-----

I think there are two cycles going on here. One is the more or less random cycle of the seasons where the winters are "mild". The other is the cycle of magic, the waxing of which seems to always be heralded by an especially long and terrible winter. My theory is this:

1)As the power of the Enemy (god of cold and death)waxes, it initiates a particularly long and terrible winter.

2)R'hllor (god of fire and life)responds to this by reincarnating his champion (Azor Ahai) to rally/enslave mankind to the fight, and agitating his holy creatures, the dragons who increase in number, strengthening those forms of magic allied to R'hllor.

3)The Old God Faction (Heart Trees, Children of the Forest, Skinchangers) are a kind of "neutral" group representing natural order that gets caught up in all this, and who seek to whether/manage the war between these two gods. We know their magic can bind the Enemy and the Others (the Wall, the last city of the Children, the habit of building towns centered on a Heart Tree taught to the First Men by the Children), we know their magic can kill the Enemy's servants as well as R'hllor's can(the crows eating the zombies), we know it can spy on the servants of the Two Warring Gods but not the Gods themselves (Bran's dreams), and we know it isn't necessarily seen as evil by R'hllor (Melissandre's tolerance for Jon's nature as a warg compared to her dogmatic desire to destroy idols and Heart Trees).

To stir the pot a bit more, if Jon is really the son of Lyanna and Rhaegar, that would make him heir to both the skinchanger and the dragon-riding bloodlines; a champion of both R'hllor and the Old Gods. In this sense, the name of the series, "A Song of Ice and Fire", would be quite literal as a tale of Snow and the Dragons.
 
2012-04-24 05:53:06 PM

Carth: imgod2u: Heron: DamnYankees: I haven't read ahead in the books, but would it really be a problem to just say that the plot of the series takes place over 6-7 years? The show seems to move at such a slow pace anyway, I don't see how this would be that bad to do. Is there something which happens in book 5 or so which *requires* Arya or Bran to be prepubescent or something?

Please don't spoil specific things which happen in the books.

No it wouldn't. Martin has been pretty upfront that the chronology of the story is actually longer than most fans realize, that there are frequently large time gaps between chapters, and that some chapters that most fans think take place over the course of days actually take place over the course of weeks or months. There's plenty of temporal wiggle-room in the series.

Yes but there are some clear markers in the story -- Sansa's 17th birthday, for instance -- which can only be explained away by saying their "years" are different than Earth's. But then again, if that were true, age 17 would be like age 9 in modern metrics.

There's also the matter of Sansa's pubescent developments and their discussions of her "coming of age" at the beginning of the story. So there's a pretty good gauge that the story thus far is no longer than 3-4 years at most and likely less than that.

Who knew girl-fluid would be such a useful gauge of time.

The characters in the book and movie are intentionally different ages. Dany is 13 in the book and 18 in the show Sansa and Arya have been aged up 2 years


I'm speaking strictly of how long the story in the book takes. Of course, they can do anything with changes to explain away how fast these kids are aging.
 
2012-04-24 05:57:46 PM

Heron: 3)The Old God Faction (Heart Trees, Children of the Forest, Skinchangers) are a kind of "neutral" group representing natural order that gets caught up in all this, and who seek to whetherweather/manage the war between these two gods.



d'oh
FTFM
 
2012-04-24 06:01:22 PM

imgod2u: Carth: imgod2u: Heron: DamnYankees: I haven't read ahead in the books, but would it really be a problem to just say that the plot of the series takes place over 6-7 years? The show seems to move at such a slow pace anyway, I don't see how this would be that bad to do. Is there something which happens in book 5 or so which *requires* Arya or Bran to be prepubescent or something?

Please don't spoil specific things which happen in the books.

No it wouldn't. Martin has been pretty upfront that the chronology of the story is actually longer than most fans realize, that there are frequently large time gaps between chapters, and that some chapters that most fans think take place over the course of days actually take place over the course of weeks or months. There's plenty of temporal wiggle-room in the series.

Yes but there are some clear markers in the story -- Sansa's 17th birthday, for instance -- which can only be explained away by saying their "years" are different than Earth's. But then again, if that were true, age 17 would be like age 9 in modern metrics.

There's also the matter of Sansa's pubescent developments and their discussions of her "coming of age" at the beginning of the story. So there's a pretty good gauge that the story thus far is no longer than 3-4 years at most and likely less than that.

Who knew girl-fluid would be such a useful gauge of time.

The characters in the book and movie are intentionally different ages. Dany is 13 in the book and 18 in the show Sansa and Arya have been aged up 2 years

I'm speaking strictly of how long the story in the book takes. Of course, they can do anything with changes to explain away how fast these kids are aging.


True. But it is helpful to the producers since people don't change as much from 14-20 as they do from 11-17.
 
2012-04-24 06:03:12 PM

nopokerface: Cymbal: Explain to me how being able to alter your face to such a degree so that you look like a completely different person is not magical. It is certainly not natural for humans to be able to do that.

It's in the books, I don't want to spoil it.


The explanation in the books was still pretty magical. Lots of what the Faceless Men do is just misdirection and slight of hand, but that particular trick is true-blue prestidigitation of a vaguely necromantic variety.
 
2012-04-24 06:09:37 PM

Carth: imgod2u: Carth: imgod2u: Heron: DamnYankees: I haven't read ahead in the books, but would it really be a problem to just say that the plot of the series takes place over 6-7 years? The show seems to move at such a slow pace anyway, I don't see how this would be that bad to do. Is there something which happens in book 5 or so which *requires* Arya or Bran to be prepubescent or something?

Please don't spoil specific things which happen in the books.

No it wouldn't. Martin has been pretty upfront that the chronology of the story is actually longer than most fans realize, that there are frequently large time gaps between chapters, and that some chapters that most fans think take place over the course of days actually take place over the course of weeks or months. There's plenty of temporal wiggle-room in the series.

Yes but there are some clear markers in the story -- Sansa's 17th birthday, for instance -- which can only be explained away by saying their "years" are different than Earth's. But then again, if that were true, age 17 would be like age 9 in modern metrics.

There's also the matter of Sansa's pubescent developments and their discussions of her "coming of age" at the beginning of the story. So there's a pretty good gauge that the story thus far is no longer than 3-4 years at most and likely less than that.

Who knew girl-fluid would be such a useful gauge of time.

The characters in the book and movie are intentionally different ages. Dany is 13 in the book and 18 in the show Sansa and Arya have been aged up 2 years

I'm speaking strictly of how long the story in the book takes. Of course, they can do anything with changes to explain away how fast these kids are aging.

True. But it is helpful to the producers since people don't change as much from 14-20 as they do from 11-17.


That depends on the person. Particularly the Stark girls. Arya looked the role (even if the actress/character was older) when it comes to the wirey/thin/spritely description but that may not be true if she has a growth spurt and ends up being 6' tall.

I only noticed it yesterday but compared to the actress who plays Shae, Sansa's a giant.
 
2012-04-24 06:34:14 PM

Digitalstrange: you are a puppet: Confabulat: The Thoroughbred of Sin: Since this is a thread about the SHOW and not the books, anyone posting about events past Episode 4 of the second season is seriously out of bounds. Have some respect for others who are either enjoying the show or perhaps a book or two behind you. Seriously

Good luck with that. These idiots post everything about the books and then complain that it's your fault you haven't spent the last 15 years reading 5000 pages.

They'll get their burrowing rats in the end, farkers. Do you really feel cool because you posted stuff that's not on the show yet? Does it make you feel smart? Does it make your penis feel bigger than its usual 4 inches?

lol. I have noticed it's a real point of pride for people to be able to spoil this series.

Sorry to break it to you but most of us don't give a damn about you or whether the series is spoiled for you. We enter these threads to discuss a book and TV series we love with other people who have read and watched them as well. Sometimes our discussions range past the TV series because there are still plenty of unresolved plot points and Martin doesn't always spell everything out in the books.

(no spoilers)

One of the most interesting of these to me is Renly. I have had a few different people, here and in other discussions say they didn't think Renly was gay in the books, It is true that in the books there was no explicit sex scene like in the show between Loras and Renly but the hints were there about Renly from beginning and in book 2 it was all but spelled out about him and Loras.

I actually hate what they've done with Renly in the show. He was not a coward or afraid of fighting. I feel like the shows writers were poisoned because they believed Ned and Catelyn's opinions of him.

Renly was right when he offered Ned soldiers to take Cersei and her kids in hand and take over ruling. He was right to leave Kings Landing when Ned refused him. His meandering march from Storms End to K ...


I never said anything about the series being spoiled for me. FYI your post makes you look really bad; like a person with lots of aspergers and no friends. I'm sure you don't give a damn.
 
2012-04-24 06:40:26 PM

JohnBigBootay: That said, I find it odd that those for whom spoilers are a huge deal would come into a thread like this, populated by a bunch of internet strangers who are commenting on the thing you do not want spoiled. Do you really have an expectation that some unwritten rules would be followed by this herd of kittens?


Exactly. The day people on the internet stop acting like self-absorbed cocks and consider other people long enough to type the word "spoiler" is the day the internet doesn't exist.
 
2012-04-24 06:46:20 PM
Dany is a great character? Seriously? She is totally annoying in the books. Solving everything via magic mary sue powers... Annoying. Same with Jon don't call me stark Snow.

Love Joffrey and his dear ol da, and the show has felt a little shorthanded without the kingslayer in very many scenes. Of course, he will have a hand in many of the scenes to come.

Can't wait for the buddy story with his beautiful traveling companion.

/winter is coming? The stark line should be "stupid is coming"
 
2012-04-24 06:51:01 PM

Kaybeck: Exactly. The day people on the internet stop acting like self-absorbed cocks and consider other people long enough to type the word "spoiler" is the day the internet doesn't exist.


I never intentionally spoil someone. But I'll be damned if I come into a fark thread about game of thrones expecting to not see some particular information about game of thrones. I don't just expect there might be spoilers in here... I am absolutely 100% certain there will be spoilers of all kinds in here. Anyone assuming otherwise is engaging is some sort of reasoning I do not understand. There's places where one might comment on these kinds of things while having some reasonable expectation of not being spoiled - particular fan sites - author forums, etc. But they are unfailingly labeled and heavily moderated by fanatics of the same ilk. Fark is most certainly NOT one of those places.

I will try to be helpful and post a guide for the future:

The following future fark threads mentioning the game of thrones tv show or books will feature spoilers...

- all of them
 
2012-04-24 06:57:10 PM

imgod2u: Carth: imgod2u: Carth: imgod2u: Heron: DamnYankees: I haven't read ahead in the books, but would it really be a problem to just say that the plot of the series takes place over 6-7 years? The show seems to move at such a slow pace anyway, I don't see how this would be that bad to do. Is there something which happens in book 5 or so which *requires* Arya or Bran to be prepubescent or something?

Please don't spoil specific things which happen in the books.

No it wouldn't. Martin has been pretty upfront that the chronology of the story is actually longer than most fans realize, that there are frequently large time gaps between chapters, and that some chapters that most fans think take place over the course of days actually take place over the course of weeks or months. There's plenty of temporal wiggle-room in the series.

Yes but there are some clear markers in the story -- Sansa's 17th birthday, for instance -- which can only be explained away by saying their "years" are different than Earth's. But then again, if that were true, age 17 would be like age 9 in modern metrics.

There's also the matter of Sansa's pubescent developments and their discussions of her "coming of age" at the beginning of the story. So there's a pretty good gauge that the story thus far is no longer than 3-4 years at most and likely less than that.

Who knew girl-fluid would be such a useful gauge of time.

The characters in the book and movie are intentionally different ages. Dany is 13 in the book and 18 in the show Sansa and Arya have been aged up 2 years

I'm speaking strictly of how long the story in the book takes. Of course, they can do anything with changes to explain away how fast these kids are aging.

True. But it is helpful to the producers since people don't change as much from 14-20 as they do from 11-17.

That depends on the person. Particularly the Stark girls. Arya looked the role (even if the actress/character was older) when it comes to the wirey/thin/spritely descripti ...


Families vary. I've got a combination of northern euro and asian blood. I'm 5'10 140 with black hair and black eyes, another brother is 6'2" 160 blonde haired blue eyed, another is 5'6" 160 brown hair and green eyes. TV and Movies tend to ignore this.
 
2012-04-24 06:59:57 PM
images.sodahead.com
I really wonder if this actress is actually related to Joffrey. They look so alike. Both great at playing horrible, horrible people.
 
2012-04-24 07:04:33 PM

MagSeven: [images.sodahead.com image 229x350]
I really wonder if this actress is actually related to Joffrey. They look so alike. Both great at playing horrible, horrible people.


Gah, thanks a lot. Now I've got the weirdest boner ever.
 
2012-04-24 07:09:04 PM
I can think of a couple other shows where this is a problem.

The daughter from Mad Men this year suddenly has a tranny voice. If they keep taking so long to make seasons every year she'll end up in her 20s in a matter of 3 show years.

On Adventure Time, instead of hiring a female to do a boy's voice like for Bart Simpson, they hired a boy to do Finn's voice. So he starts off sounding like a boy but this season he sounds more like Barry White.
 
2012-04-24 07:15:49 PM

imgod2u: MagSeven: [images.sodahead.com image 229x350]
I really wonder if this actress is actually related to Joffrey. They look so alike. Both great at playing horrible, horrible people.

Gah, thanks a lot. Now I've got the weirdest boner ever.


Now that I think about it, it really can't be unseen.
/sorry, bro!
 
2012-04-24 07:30:26 PM

imgod2u: Most of the women are pretty batshait irrational in the book. The most stark example being Catelyn.


I see what you did there.
 
2012-04-24 07:30:30 PM

ha-ha-guy: knightofargh: doglover: Kind of. By at the same time, what happens to him, ALL OF IT, isn't even full justice.

Speaking as a parent, I'd [SPOILER for the 2 people left that haven't made it 100 pages in or through 1 episode] toss Bran out of a window myself.

More so after his fall, whiny little farker.

What's killing me is all the Starks I liked are dead (aside from Jon Snow). Anything involving the North now is just "urgh" as I read it. With his next book I just want the ability to buy a copy that has the Tyrion and Jon Snow chapters in it (I know about the ending to the last one, but remember Fire Priestess) and forget the rest. Maybe Daenyrs as well.


---Spoilers---

I'm pretty sure Martin is on record either saying Jon isn't dead, or heavily implying that Jon isn't dead. Since Martin hasn't used interviews to deliberately mislead the audience yet (only to taunt them with riddles), I believe him.
 
2012-04-24 07:34:04 PM

Heron: ha-ha-guy: knightofargh: doglover: Kind of. By at the same time, what happens to him, ALL OF IT, isn't even full justice.

Speaking as a parent, I'd [SPOILER for the 2 people left that haven't made it 100 pages in or through 1 episode] toss Bran out of a window myself.

More so after his fall, whiny little farker.

What's killing me is all the Starks I liked are dead (aside from Jon Snow). Anything involving the North now is just "urgh" as I read it. With his next book I just want the ability to buy a copy that has the Tyrion and Jon Snow chapters in it (I know about the ending to the last one, but remember Fire Priestess) and forget the rest. Maybe Daenyrs as well.

---Spoilers---

I'm pretty sure Martin is on record either saying Jon isn't dead, or heavily implying that Jon isn't dead.


That's probably why he said "aside from Jon Snow". It's pretty clear just from various clues dropped in the text that he's not going to be perma-dead.
 
2012-04-24 07:35:11 PM

legion_of_doo: he will have a hand in many of the scenes to come.


Very nice ... was that intentional?
 
2012-04-24 07:36:32 PM

Nrokreffefp: Families vary. I've got a combination of northern euro and asian blood. I'm 5'10 140 with black hair and black eyes, another brother is 6'2" 160 blonde haired blue eyed, another is 5'6" 160 brown hair and green eyes. TV and Movies tend to ignore this.


Then there are families like mine, where pretty much every male ever born in the bloodline has looked and sounded remarkably similar. Occasionally we'll get a redhead, but I'd say 80% of my family is tall, lanky males with dark brown hair, dark brown eyes, and almost the same face.
 
2012-04-24 07:38:39 PM

Skyrmion: Heron: ha-ha-guy: knightofargh: doglover: Kind of. By at the same time, what happens to him, ALL OF IT, isn't even full justice.

Speaking as a parent, I'd [SPOILER for the 2 people left that haven't made it 100 pages in or through 1 episode] toss Bran out of a window myself.

More so after his fall, whiny little farker.

What's killing me is all the Starks I liked are dead (aside from Jon Snow). Anything involving the North now is just "urgh" as I read it. With his next book I just want the ability to buy a copy that has the Tyrion and Jon Snow chapters in it (I know about the ending to the last one, but remember Fire Priestess) and forget the rest. Maybe Daenyrs as well.

---Spoilers---

I'm pretty sure Martin is on record either saying Jon isn't dead, or heavily implying that Jon isn't dead.

That's probably why he said "aside from Jon Snow". It's pretty clear just from various clues dropped in the text that he's not going to be perma-dead.


Oh, duh; when I read that I totally missed the"aside". Weird, stupid brain skipping text. Anyway; mea culpa.
 
2012-04-24 07:44:15 PM

Skyrmion: That's probably why he said "aside from Jon Snow". It's pretty clear just from various clues dropped in the text that he's not going to be perma-dead.


www.hecklerspray.com
 
2012-04-24 07:48:17 PM

MagSeven: I really wonder if this actress is actually related to Joffrey. They look so alike. Both great at playing horrible, horrible people.


Alison Argram, no relation. In real life, funny, snarky, sweet, heavily into AIDS-related charities. Her "Confessions of a Prarie Biatch" is a great read.

I fully expect Jack Gleeson to be as nice as his character is evil.
 
2012-04-24 07:55:09 PM
alwaysjaded

And can we please round up all the dipshiats sending Gleeson death threats into a room and explain to them how to seperate the actor from the character?

Sadly, nothing new. Larry Hagman (Dallas) reportedly had to have bodyguards as fans of the show would come after him because they hated JR.
 
2012-04-24 07:57:27 PM
Without having read the books, I think they can jut be vague about how fast and slowly time passes, a la Empire Strikes Back.
 
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