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(Some Guy)   Dodgers to give away free blankets when they host the Native American-themed Braves tomorrow night. No smallpox this time, they promise   (goldstar.com) divider line 40
    More: Stupid, Braves, Dodgers, Freddie Freeman, Jason Heyward, Brian McCann, Matt Kemp, Dodger Stadium, Dee Gordon  
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833 clicks; posted to Sports » on 23 Apr 2012 at 9:31 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-04-23 09:07:56 AM
Yeah, won't be falling for that old trick again
 
2012-04-23 09:12:53 AM
www.bodybuilding.com

Approves.
 
2012-04-23 09:34:35 AM
Not just blankets...sleeved blankets. So not only can you die horribly of smallpox but you can look like a complete idiot while doing it.
 
2012-04-23 09:45:57 AM
Do the fans have to give them back at the end of the game?
 
2012-04-23 09:47:47 AM
FREE BLANKET

tvmanonline.com
 
2012-04-23 09:48:34 AM
"Free Blanket!"

tvmanonline.com
 
2012-04-23 09:50:06 AM
Goddammit, funk_soul_bubby...
 
2012-04-23 09:51:36 AM

Ponzholio: Do the fans have to give them back at the end of the game?


No, the organization takes them back while ignoring the promises that they made about letting people keep them
 
2012-04-23 09:54:09 AM

peachpicker: Goddammit, funk_soul_bubby...


I'm sure we weren't the only ones.
 
2012-04-23 10:01:46 AM
Blankets are sooooo last century. Where's my slanket?

i830.photobucket.com

Oh. That's uh, a creative pose there, Tim.
 
2012-04-23 10:02:40 AM

funk_soul_bubby: peachpicker: Goddammit, funk_soul_bubby...

I'm sure we weren't the only ones.


Nope, you weren't. Zombie Michael Jackson must be busy.
 
2012-04-23 10:31:38 AM
Dang... i'm going to TONIGHT's game, not tomorrows. Meh, free tickets at least.
 
2012-04-23 11:09:44 AM
The Braves, originally from Boston, took their name from the participants in the Boston Tea Party, not from any actual Native Americans-- the team was founded as the Red Stockings, then became Red Caps, the Beaneaters, the Doves (after their newly red-less white uniforms and the surname of team owners John and George Dovey), and the Rustlers before choosing (and eventually settling on, despite a few years in the '30s as the Bees) the name Braves in 1912 in honour of the Tea Party. The team's name has nothing to do with Native Americans, Tomahawk Chop notwithstanding.

...And if you believe that, you clearly don't know very much about the Braves, Boston history, or past owner James Gaffney's Tammany Hall connection.

So, can "slanket" now double as a portmanteau of "smallpox" and "blanket," or would that have to be a "smanket"?
 
2012-04-23 11:20:56 AM

xpisblack: So, can "slanket" now double as a portmanteau of "smallpox" and "blanket," or would that have to be a "smanket"?


The term you're looking for is "blague."
 
2012-04-23 11:39:45 AM

xpisblack: The Braves, originally from Boston, took their name from the participants in the Boston Tea Party, not from any actual Native Americans-- the team was founded as the Red Stockings, then became Red Caps, the Beaneaters, the Doves (after their newly red-less white uniforms and the surname of team owners John and George Dovey), and the Rustlers before choosing (and eventually settling on, despite a few years in the '30s as the Bees) the name Braves in 1912 in honour of the Tea Party. The team's name has nothing to do with Native Americans, Tomahawk Chop notwithstanding.

...And if you believe that, you clearly don't know very much about the Braves, Boston history, or past owner James Gaffney's Tammany Hall connection.

So, can "slanket" now double as a portmanteau of "smallpox" and "blanket," or would that have to be a "smanket"?


Sure, this is the team that, at various points in its history in Boston, Milwaukee and Atlanta, has used these logos:

georgiainfo.galileo.usg.educontent.sportslogos.netupload.wikimedia.orgcontent.sportslogos.netupload.wikimedia.org

But yeah, any suggestion of a connection with Native Americans is just ignorant of history. Makes perfect sense to me.
 
2012-04-23 11:45:06 AM
Crap! Wrong thread!
 
2012-04-23 11:45:19 AM

Super Chronic: xpisblack: The Braves, originally from Boston, took their name from the participants in the Boston Tea Party, not from any actual Native Americans-- the team was founded as the Red Stockings, then became Red Caps, the Beaneaters, the Doves (after their newly red-less white uniforms and the surname of team owners John and George Dovey), and the Rustlers before choosing (and eventually settling on, despite a few years in the '30s as the Bees) the name Braves in 1912 in honour of the Tea Party. The team's name has nothing to do with Native Americans, Tomahawk Chop notwithstanding.

...And if you believe that, you clearly don't know very much about the Braves, Boston history, or past owner James Gaffney's Tammany Hall connection.

So, can "slanket" now double as a portmanteau of "smallpox" and "blanket," or would that have to be a "smanket"?

Sure, this is the team that, at various points in its history in Boston, Milwaukee and Atlanta, has used these logos:

[georgiainfo.galileo.usg.edu image 128x120][content.sportslogos.net image 143x120][upload.wikimedia.org image 120x120][content.sportslogos.net image 157x120][upload.wikimedia.org image 309x120]

But yeah, any suggestion of a connection with Native Americans is just ignorant of history. Makes perfect sense to me.


You know how I know you didn't read or understand what I wrote? Hint: (re)read the bit in bold.



grinding_journalist: xpisblack: So, can "slanket" now double as a portmanteau of "smallpox" and "blanket," or would that have to be a "smanket"?

The term you're looking for is "blague."


I thought that referred to the horrifying proliferation of web-logs.
 
2012-04-23 11:53:33 AM

xpisblack: Super Chronic: xpisblack: The Braves, originally from Boston, took their name from the participants in the Boston Tea Party, not from any actual Native Americans-- the team was founded as the Red Stockings, then became Red Caps, the Beaneaters, the Doves (after their newly red-less white uniforms and the surname of team owners John and George Dovey), and the Rustlers before choosing (and eventually settling on, despite a few years in the '30s as the Bees) the name Braves in 1912 in honour of the Tea Party. The team's name has nothing to do with Native Americans, Tomahawk Chop notwithstanding.

...And if you believe that, you clearly don't know very much about the Braves, Boston history, or past owner James Gaffney's Tammany Hall connection.

So, can "slanket" now double as a portmanteau of "smallpox" and "blanket," or would that have to be a "smanket"?

Sure, this is the team that, at various points in its history in Boston, Milwaukee and Atlanta, has used these logos:

[georgiainfo.galileo.usg.edu image 128x120][content.sportslogos.net image 143x120][upload.wikimedia.org image 120x120][content.sportslogos.net image 157x120][upload.wikimedia.org image 309x120]

But yeah, any suggestion of a connection with Native Americans is just ignorant of history. Makes perfect sense to me.

You know how I know you didn't read or understand what I wrote? Hint: (re)read the bit in bold.


I read it and understood it just fine. When you say the team's name has nothing to do with Native Americans, you're wrong. Even if the origins of the name come from someplace else, the organization has quite clearly, for a century now, in three different cities, embraced the Native American meaning of its name. The part that I boldfaced in the quote above is unambiguously wrong. Your implication that the Tomahawk Chop was the first Native American connection is also unambiguously wrong (evidently you never heard of Chief Nock-a-Homa).
 
2012-04-23 11:53:53 AM
"Yeah, we're getting whiskey drunk tonight. F**k you white man"

www.bluecorncomics.com


Indian guy slapped my bumper when I was at a stop sign up in montana and tried to fake an injury once. Bunch of poor idiots
 
2012-04-23 11:55:17 AM
Did that ever really happen? I mean I know there were plans to give the Indians infected blankets but did it ever actually happen?
 
2012-04-23 11:58:22 AM

xpisblack: You know how I know you didn't read or understand what I wrote? Hint: (re)read the bit in bold.


Oh yeah, and I went and googled your underlying claim because I found it interesting, and it turns out you're propagating baseball myth #17. For what it's worth (and granted that it isn't an authoritative source), Wiki also says it is of Native American origin.
 
2012-04-23 11:59:30 AM

Chak: Did that ever really happen? I mean I know there were plans to give the Indians infected blankets but did it ever actually happen?


Even if they did, it would not have mattered. Anything the Europeans gave to the Indians would have been infected with small pox. Simply breathing next to them would have been enough. As soon as a European met a Native American, the Native Americans were doomed.

/thinks stopping small pox vaccination was stupid even with wiping it out
 
2012-04-23 12:02:13 PM

grinding_journalist: Blankets are sooooo last century. Where's my slanket?

[i830.photobucket.com image 500x367]

Oh. That's uh, a creative pose there, Tim.


I misread the 'presented by Fanta' part as 'presented by Faygo'...

/someone shoop some ICP facepaint onto Timmeh stat!
 
2012-04-23 12:02:37 PM

xpisblack: .


Oh, I get it now. Your final statement was supposed to undo the first statement. I suppose a mea culpa is in order, but in fairness, that wasn't entirely clear. I read "if you believe that..." as referring to believing what the headline said. But yes, I did in fact misread. We cool?
 
2012-04-23 12:06:19 PM

Super Chronic: I read it and understood it just fine. When you say the team's name has nothing to do with Native Americans, you're wrong. Even if the origins of the name come from someplace else, the organization has quite clearly, for a century now, in three different cities, embraced the Native American meaning of its name. The part that I boldfaced in the quote above is unambiguously wrong. Your implication that the Tomahawk Chop was the first Native American connection is also unambiguously wrong (evidently you never heard of Chief Nock-a-Homa).


No, what I said was, essentially, that if you believe what I wrote in my first paragraph, you're an idiot. Hence: "if you believe that [here, this pronoun with an admittedly ambiguous antecedent refers to the first paragraph], you clearly don't know very much about the Braves, Boston history, or past owner James Gaffney's Tammany Hall connection." Because if you did know anything about those three items, you would know that there really is a strong Native American connection.

In other words, I was attacking the very position you seem to think I was taking. I wasn't. Try it again, this time actually reading the words I wrote instead of the ones you think I wrote.
 
2012-04-23 12:07:48 PM

Super Chronic: xpisblack: Super Chronic: xpisblack: The Braves, originally from Boston, took their name from the participants in the Boston Tea Party, not from any actual Native Americans-- the team was founded as the Red Stockings, then became Red Caps, the Beaneaters, the Doves (after their newly red-less white uniforms and the surname of team owners John and George Dovey), and the Rustlers before choosing (and eventually settling on, despite a few years in the '30s as the Bees) the name Braves in 1912 in honour of the Tea Party. The team's name has nothing to do with Native Americans, Tomahawk Chop notwithstanding.

...And if you believe that, you clearly don't know very much about the Braves, Boston history, or past owner James Gaffney's Tammany Hall connection.

So, can "slanket" now double as a portmanteau of "smallpox" and "blanket," or would that have to be a "smanket"?

Sure, this is the team that, at various points in its history in Boston, Milwaukee and Atlanta, has used these logos:

[georgiainfo.galileo.usg.edu image 128x120][content.sportslogos.net image 143x120][upload.wikimedia.org image 120x120][content.sportslogos.net image 157x120][upload.wikimedia.org image 309x120]

But yeah, any suggestion of a connection with Native Americans is just ignorant of history. Makes perfect sense to me.

You know how I know you didn't read or understand what I wrote? Hint: (re)read the bit in bold.


I read it and understood it just fine. When you say the team's name has nothing to do with Native Americans, you're wrong. Even if the origins of the name come from someplace else, the organization has quite clearly, for a century now, in three different cities, embraced the Native American meaning of its name. The part that I boldfaced in the quote above is unambiguously wrong. Your implication that the Tomahawk Chop was the first Native American connection is also unambiguously wrong (evidently you never heard of Chief Nock-a-Homa).


Be honest....did you really read what was written? At the end of the first paragraph it is mentioned there is no Native connection...right under that, RIGHT under it, and bolded later are the words 'And if you believe that, you clearly don't know very much about the Braves, Boston history, or past owner James Gaffney's Tammany Hall connection'

Xpisblack never stated 'When you say the team's name has nothing to do with Native Americans'. But it is fun watching you either not read, not comprehend, or both, his original post and follow ups.
 
2012-04-23 12:10:37 PM
So, Jenny McCarthy isn't throwing out the first pitch?
 
2012-04-23 12:12:52 PM

rudemix: Super Chronic: xpisblack: Super Chronic: xpisblack: The Braves, originally from Boston, took their name from the participants in the Boston Tea Party, not from any actual Native Americans-- the team was founded as the Red Stockings, then became Red Caps, the Beaneaters, the Doves (after their newly red-less white uniforms and the surname of team owners John and George Dovey), and the Rustlers before choosing (and eventually settling on, despite a few years in the '30s as the Bees) the name Braves in 1912 in honour of the Tea Party. The team's name has nothing to do with Native Americans, Tomahawk Chop notwithstanding.

...And if you believe that, you clearly don't know very much about the Braves, Boston history, or past owner James Gaffney's Tammany Hall connection.

So, can "slanket" now double as a portmanteau of "smallpox" and "blanket," or would that have to be a "smanket"?

Sure, this is the team that, at various points in its history in Boston, Milwaukee and Atlanta, has used these logos:

[georgiainfo.galileo.usg.edu image 128x120][content.sportslogos.net image 143x120][upload.wikimedia.org image 120x120][content.sportslogos.net image 157x120][upload.wikimedia.org image 309x120]

But yeah, any suggestion of a connection with Native Americans is just ignorant of history. Makes perfect sense to me.

You know how I know you didn't read or understand what I wrote? Hint: (re)read the bit in bold.


I read it and understood it just fine. When you say the team's name has nothing to do with Native Americans, you're wrong. Even if the origins of the name come from someplace else, the organization has quite clearly, for a century now, in three different cities, embraced the Native American meaning of its name. The part that I boldfaced in the quote above is unambiguously wrong. Your implication that the Tomahawk Chop was the first Native American connection is also unambiguously wrong (evidently you never heard of Chief Nock-a-Homa).

Be honest....did you really read w ...


Yes, and I already admitted I farked it up. I took the last sentence as continuing to argue with the headline, and didn't know what the Tammany Hall connectionw as. So, yeah.
 
2012-04-23 12:46:40 PM
I got a Dodgers sleeved blanket last year, and traded it with my friend who got the Angels Lucha Libre mask.

/csb
//but true
 
2012-04-23 01:43:38 PM
imageshack.us
 
2012-04-23 01:46:53 PM

Super Chronic:

Sure, this is the team that, at various points in its history in Boston, Milwaukee and Atlanta, has used these logos:

[georgiainfo.galileo.usg.edu image 128x120][content.sportslogos.net image 143x120][upload.wikimedia.org image 120x120][content.sportslogos.net image 157x120][upload.wikimedia.org image 309x120]


That first logo is a fake.
 
2012-04-23 02:27:04 PM

Hoopy Frood: Super Chronic:

Sure, this is the team that, at various points in its history in Boston, Milwaukee and Atlanta, has used these logos:

[georgiainfo.galileo.usg.edu image 128x120][content.sportslogos.net image 143x120][upload.wikimedia.org image 120x120][content.sportslogos.net image 157x120][upload.wikimedia.org image 309x120]

That first logo is a fake.


I'm just taking a mulligan on this thread, mmkay?
 
2012-04-23 02:30:56 PM
The claim that the US Government deliberately spread smallpox via infected blankets is a myth perpetuated by the the academic frauds committed by Ward "Little Eichmanns" Churchill: see Did the U.S. Army Distribute Smallpox Blankets to Indians? Fabrication and Falsification in Ward Churchill's Genocide Rhetoric
 
2012-04-23 03:02:49 PM

Rannuci: The claim that the US Government deliberately spread smallpox via infected blankets is a myth perpetuated by the the academic frauds committed by Ward "Little Eichmanns" Churchill: see Did the U.S. Army Distribute Smallpox Blankets to Indians? Fabrication and Falsification in Ward Churchill's Genocide Rhetoric


I have not read the article you link here, but the tale of distributing blankets infected with smallpox is not an American one - it is a Canadian one. Lord Amherst referred to the plan in a few letters during the French and Indian War. The letters suggest that the scheme was never carried out, but that it was under consideration, possibly more facetiously than not. Link
 
2012-04-23 03:25:16 PM

O.M.E.: Rannuci: The claim that the US Government deliberately spread smallpox via infected blankets is a myth perpetuated by the the academic frauds committed by Ward "Little Eichmanns" Churchill: see Did the U.S. Army Distribute Smallpox Blankets to Indians? Fabrication and Falsification in Ward Churchill's Genocide Rhetoric

I have not read the article you link here, but the tale of distributing blankets infected with smallpox is not an American one - it is a Canadian one. Lord Amherst referred to the plan in a few letters during the French and Indian War. The letters suggest that the scheme was never carried out, but that it was under consideration, possibly more facetiously than not. Link


It doesn't really matter if it actually happened or even if it was actually discussed. The important thing is that enough people think it did to make this thread relevant.

Hoopy Frood: Super Chronic:

Sure, this is the team that, at various points in its history in Boston, Milwaukee and Atlanta, has used these logos:

[georgiainfo.galileo.usg.edu image 128x120][content.sportslogos.net image 143x120][upload.wikimedia.org image 120x120][content.sportslogos.net image 157x120][upload.wikimedia.org image 309x120]

That first logo is a fake.


Looks too modern
 
2012-04-23 04:32:27 PM
Super Chronic:I'm just taking a mulligan on this thread, mmkay?

I enjoyed this thread for no reason other than your mess, so there is that my friend
 
2012-04-23 04:57:01 PM

Super Chronic: We cool?


Yeah, we're good. No worries. To be honest, you were so adamant that I worried I'd left out a key word or two; otherwise, I'd just have let the whole thing go immediately.


O.M.E.: I have not read the article you link here, but the tale of distributing blankets infected with smallpox is not an American one - it is a Canadian one. Lord Amherst referred to the plan in a few letters during the French and Indian War. The letters suggest that the scheme was never carried out, but that it was under consideration, possibly more facetiously than not. Link


Canadian? Really? Lord Amherst was a damn long-tail, born in England. He served as Crown Governor of Virginia and then Governor of the Province of Quebec before eventually being named Commander-in-Chief of the Forces, a cabinet position back in England. He was as Canadian as he was German or American or Flemish-- he fought in each place, and no more. He was, for five years, the Commander-in-Chief, North America, meaning he oversaw all the British troops in North America, encompassing the Canadian colonies and the American ones. He fought in Newfoundland and Nova Scotia as well as by Lake Champlain and more. Sometimes he fought the French, sometimes the Native Americans. Precious little he did during his North American military career was Canadian save by the stupidest definition of "happening in country that would eventually become known as Canada" (the British colonists didn't start using that name until 1791). It's like calling Thomas Gage an American because of his time spent fighting there.

The smallpox-blanket story a widespread North American legend about colonial English enormities with implementation least dodgily documented somewhere in Canada. Point is, Lord Amhest was a filthy Englishman: where he discussed his cruel plan doesn't make him or the plan any less English.
 
2012-04-24 01:22:20 AM
Came here expecting to read derp and ended up with confusion and misreadings....

Feeling oddly satisfied with fark tonight.
 
2012-04-24 09:07:52 AM

Rannuci: The claim that the US Government deliberately spread smallpox via infected blankets is a myth perpetuated by the the academic frauds committed by Ward "Little Eichmanns" Churchill: see Did the U.S. Army Distribute Smallpox Blankets to Indians? Fabrication and Falsification in Ward Churchill's Genocide Rhetoric


Yes. And not only that, but also the U.S. Army weaponized the smallpox to convert it from an aerosol form of contagion to one that was transmitted blanket-mordently. That's why all the old references to it called it "ye olde leapin' pox".
 
2012-04-24 09:43:53 AM
Myth or not, I'm still building a SARS blanket list. I'm keeping my eye on you guys.....
 
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