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(Newser)   First came "pink slime," the processed beef too dubious even for McDonald's. Now "tuna scrape" might be poised to become the seafood equivalent   (newser.com) divider line 141
    More: Scary, Mcdonald, beef  
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13013 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 Apr 2012 at 9:01 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-04-22 09:51:24 PM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: MemeSlave: All of this is fixed by becoming vegetarian.

Because no one EVER got salmonella or e. coli from a salad, right?


Your sarcasm is correct and makes a good point. Most cases of chain store food poisoning are from the onions or the tomatoes. They tend to be locally sourced and undergo lighter scrutiny compared to the meat patties.

This raises the question of how e.coli gets on produce. I would suggest that when you have people paid the lowest possible wage picking food in a field for 12 hours a day without bathroom breaks, well, it's an open field isn't it?

/vegan
//health reasons
 
2012-04-22 09:52:05 PM

sno man: Ambivalence: Wow. It used to be marginal food was marketed to pet food manufacturers becuase it was deemed NFHC (Not for human consumption).

But fark it all, people will eat anything these days.

Sounds like tea party think to me..."What do you mean I shouldn't eat that?!? (You commie fascist pinko bastage) How dare you tell me what I can and can't eat!! I'll show you".... nom, nom, nommmm

/wonders if that'd work with some really bad things, like 80 year old white paint chips or chunks of old pipe insulation.


Just in case you didnt know it is private interprize that finds most of the things out thats bad for you not the goverment so suck dems and libs
 
2012-04-22 09:53:25 PM

Kumana Wanalaia: I just watched a clip of Reagan denying the need to accomodate the limited nature of resources saying "I don't believe that America can't have a brighter tomorrow", so I'm getting a kick out of cat food being sold to people as food.

Well, I guess probably one or two Americans will have a brighter tomorrow if 30 million people eat cat food at people food prices. So there's that.


Pretty sure Friskies and Dinty Moore are the same company. They just put different labels on the cans.
 
2012-04-22 09:54:31 PM

rebelyell2006: Ambivalence: Wow. It used to be marginal food was marketed to pet food manufacturers becuase it was deemed NFHC (Not for human consumption).

But fark it all, people will eat anything these days.

I don't really understand why this is in the news. Is it a recent trend to put dogfood-quality scraps in human food, or is it something that has always occurred but nobody used to talk about it? If it is recent, why is it happening (i.e. changes in FDA or USDA regulation, or changes in the dogfood market)? And if it has always occurred, was it just hidden or did people not care until now?


Upton Sinclair's The Jungle, 1906, did a credible job of exposing the disgusting side of the meat industry. Teddy Roosevelt thought it was pure BS so he sent two men whom he trusted, in secret, to inspect meat packing plants.

Knowledge of the secret inspection got out and despite "the meat packers, who worked three shifts a day for three weeks to clean the factories prior to the inspection, Neill and Reynolds [the two men Roosevelt sent] were still revolted by the conditions at the factories and at the lack of concern by plant managers."

So now we have pink slime (dog food) and white slime (cat food) gracing the tables of American consumers.

/I grind my own meats
/I read the book in high school
/the quoted text is from Wikipedia . . . but I also remember it from school in 1964
 
2012-04-22 09:55:38 PM

robmilmel: First pink slime.
Now, tuna scrape.

Soon to come:

Pork Piles!!1!


Fowl bits.
 
2012-04-22 09:55:40 PM

robmilmel: First pink slime.
Now, tuna scrape.

Soon to come:

Pork Piles!!1!


You've never had scrapple?
 
2012-04-22 09:55:49 PM
Tuna Scrape would be an excellent band name.
 
2012-04-22 09:58:12 PM

ArgusRun: Kumana Wanalaia: I just watched a clip of Reagan denying the need to accomodate the limited nature of resources saying "I don't believe that America can't have a brighter tomorrow", so I'm getting a kick out of cat food being sold to people as food.

Well, I guess probably one or two Americans will have a brighter tomorrow if 30 million people eat cat food at people food prices. So there's that.

I don't agree with the Reagan thing, but I think American standards of acceptable food has greatly increased over the past hundred years to an unsustainable level.

Tuna scrape is just stripping the extra meat off the bones. it's not treated,. It's just smaller pieces of the hole filet. Perhaps it was once used in cat food, but lobster was once a poor food. Tastes change. Today people love spicy tuna.

70 years ago, spam was an acceptable meat. 100 years ago you would not have meat every day.

Blood that gets cooked and used for feed in this country is cooked and used for sausage in Europe. Our understanding of what is acceptable food is fluid and highly variable by culture.


Shut your tolerant, sociological, elitist mouth! We are trying to have an outrage here...
 
2012-04-22 10:00:00 PM
Just wondering where these complainers think their deli meats come from? Do you think that big old slab of "chicken breast" in the deli case got cut right off some chicken?
A buddy of mine used to do maintenance at a poultry processor, the way they make deli meats sounds an awful lot like the description of how they make "pink slime."
He says they run the poultry parts (bones & all) through a high pressure hydraulic press with a fine sieve on the end. Squirts out a meat slurry. Then they process the slurry to get the correct texture & color & mold it into a "deli slab."
So, yummy...

/as long as it tastes ok & don't make me sick, who cares...
 
2012-04-22 10:01:59 PM
"I don't think enough research has been done on these products," one food safety expert says.
[...]
"I don't think it's a fair comparison at all," said one seafood expert.


"I don't think we're doing actual journalism," an unnamed website reported.

/dammit, I just posted this in the wrong thread.
 
2012-04-22 10:02:04 PM

sweet jeez: sno man: Ambivalence: Wow. It used to be marginal food was marketed to pet food manufacturers becuase it was deemed NFHC (Not for human consumption).

But fark it all, people will eat anything these days.

Sounds like tea party think to me..."What do you mean I shouldn't eat that?!? (You commie fascist pinko bastage) How dare you tell me what I can and can't eat!! I'll show you".... nom, nom, nommmm

/wonders if that'd work with some really bad things, like 80 year old white paint chips or chunks of old pipe insulation.

Just in case you didnt know it is private interprize that finds most of the things out thats bad for you not the goverment so suck dems and libs


I've got some really cheap baby formula you might be interested in, It's from China, and babies love it!, it's just a little sweet..they can't get enough!
 
2012-04-22 10:02:06 PM
So the only difference between this meat and what you get from the rest of the tuna is the tool used to remove it. So knives outrank spoons on our gross out list. That's what we've learned, that we are so shallow the choice of utensil used to prepare something ruins it for us.
 
2012-04-22 10:03:16 PM

BolloxReader: So... tuna scrape is safer because it doesn't go through the processes that make cow carcass pickings safe to eat?

Sorry, I want my marginal foodlike products to be thoroughly processed and doused with whatever kills the bacteria etc.

/no issue here with pink slime added to hamburger
//modern food is all pretty much chemistry anyway
///if celebrity chefs can do it on reality TV, why can't factories?


It's not the slime, it's the fact that the people who have been eating it not only didn't know what they were eating but that the people who made it took great pains to hide their creation with euphemisms and code words and innocuous labels. The food industry spends millions on lobbyists every year to get the laws regarding things like food safety and labeling written just the way they want them, and hide the things they don't want you to know. Whatever they aren't required by law to put on the label, they don't.

Why do you think that genetically modified foods like corn and soybeans are still not labeled as such here in the US? If the corporations stand behind what they produce, put it on the label and let the buying public decide.
 
2012-04-22 10:05:11 PM

theMagni:

Your sarcasm is correct and makes a good point. Most cases of chain store food poisoning are from the onions or the tomatoes. They tend to be locally sourced and undergo lighter scrutiny compared to the meat patties.

This raises the question of how e.coli gets on produce. I would suggest that when you have people paid the lowest possible wage picking food in a field for 12 hours a day without bathroom breaks, well, it's an open field isn't it?


As a teenager, I spent every summer picking every kind of fruit and/or vegetable that grew in the Puyallup Valley. I can assure you, your suspicions are 100% correct. Probably much worse these days, was the '70s...
 
2012-04-22 10:05:31 PM

raubtier: So the only difference between this meat and what you get from the rest of the tuna is the tool used to remove it. So knives outrank spoons on our gross out list. That's what we've learned, that we are so shallow the choice of utensil used to prepare something ruins it for us.


How about surface-area-to-volume ratio of the end product?

Sashimi-grade tuna comes in a big slab, so that the meat that's cut off of the slab has never been exposed to the air (and ostensibly to the microbes in the air) until directly before processing into tasty chunks of nigiri.

The tuna scrape comes off in flakes, which have many more surfaces available for inoculation with bacteria. It's easier to have an accident with tuna scrape than with sashimi.

Neither one would really matter, except for the fact that neither one is cooked before consumption.
 
2012-04-22 10:07:02 PM

FilmBELOH20: shanrick: Why is everyone acting like this is something new?

Because it's the outrage du jour. Pink slime beef is all the rage to get, well, all raged up about. So most of these hipsters are going to stop eating beef altogether and stick to poultry. Like Chicken McNuggets, Chicken Patty Sandwiches, Chicken fries and all those other items that are "made from 100% white meat chicken."

Really, if you want to eat anything that you know for a fact is real food, you need to kill it or grow it yourself. Last nights main course was Elk Steak. Tonight's was Walleye. I also have a Turkey in the smoker that just yesterday was walking around minding his own business. I know I'm a bad guy for being a hunter, but I haven't had any slime at all this weekend. I've not had an ounce of growth hormone, and none of the stuff I killed was on antibiotics.


Folks just want it labeled.

Eat hotdogs, but know what you're getting. Eat the textured beef product, but know what you're getting. That's what people want. It's the attempt to shed stigma by trying to hide what folks are putting in.

To be fair, I am a lot more upset about filler product being used--soy and other matter in burgers to extend it--because that really needs to be exposed. Not because it's gross, but because it's nice to know that you've got a burger that has soy or wheat product in it BEFORE you serve it to someone with an allergy.

I am just galled by the folks who defend the idea that it's just meat, so it doesn't need a label. It's a quality issue. I buy hotdogs at a certain grade. I don't want that grade to be bypassed by folks who don't want to disclose the process. Same with burger. Same with fish products. Same with just about anything.

Put it on the label, and there are folks who will still buy it. Eat it happily, but you can label it properly and not base your business model by trying to pass of low grade product as something else. Human edible doesn't necessarily mean that it's good product, and stop pricing it like it is.

We can eat earthworms easy enough. And maggots. Heck, beetles and bugs make up a part of folks diets across the world, but most of us would like it labeled. You could probably make a damn tasty rat burger, but don't try to pass it off as anything but what it is.
 
2012-04-22 10:10:59 PM

Monkeyfark Ridiculous: "ground backmeat scraped from the bones of the fish"

I just don't get what the problem is with this.

I mean, I can't say I eat a lot of ground tuna, but I don't think tuna burgers are "cat food" not fit for human consumption just because the tuna is ground up instead of being in steak form.


Save, that it's not. It's also fish bone, connective tissue, and it's the bits that have aged a bit before getting processed, because all the rest of the carcass has been picked over before.

It's a quality issue. Label it, and be done with it. Don't hide behind the 100% real fish excuse. Label it as the grade that it is, and move on. What folks have issue with is that oddly enough, it's harder to sell people "cat food shavings quality" to people, and it's about not wanting to take a hit on the profit margin.

People will eat the stuff. But let them know what grade that they're getting, not hide it.
 
2012-04-22 10:11:16 PM

phrawgh: Ambivalence: sno man: Sounds like tea party think to me..."What do you mean I shouldn't eat that?!? (You commie fascist pinko bastage) How dare you tell me what I can and can't eat!! I'll show you".... nom, nom, nommmm

/wonders if that'd work with some really bad things, like 80 year old white paint chips or chunks of old pipe insulation.

Hell I'd just pay to watch those guy eat a jar of Kimchie (or however it's spelled).

Kimchi is quite delicious, BTW.


just had some yummy kimchi bokumbap
 
2012-04-22 10:14:57 PM

hubiestubert: [wall o text]

We can eat earthworms easy enough. And maggots. Heck, beetles and bugs make up a part of folks diets across the world, but most of us would like it labeled. You could probably make a damn tasty rat burger, but don't try to pass it off as anything but what it is.


YOU might be able to make a tasty rat burger, but rodent meat is nasty, greasy and funky... There is a reason we never domesticated rodents for meat...
 
2012-04-22 10:16:33 PM

rebelyell2006: I don't really understand why this is in the news. Is it a recent trend to put dogfood-quality scraps in human food, or is it something that has always occurred but nobody used to talk about it? If it is recent, why is it happening (i.e. changes in FDA or USDA regulation, or changes in the dogfood market)? And if it has always occurred, was it just hidden or did people not care until now?


It's pretty much an urban legend gone amok, is what it is. Just because you can feed it to your dog doesn't mean you can't eat it. And you can eat things that your dog can't (chocolate, for instance)
 
2012-04-22 10:22:23 PM

IlGreven: rebelyell2006: I don't really understand why this is in the news. Is it a recent trend to put dogfood-quality scraps in human food, or is it something that has always occurred but nobody used to talk about it? If it is recent, why is it happening (i.e. changes in FDA or USDA regulation, or changes in the dogfood market)? And if it has always occurred, was it just hidden or did people not care until now?

It's pretty much an urban legend gone amok, is what it is. Just because you can feed it to your dog doesn't mean you can't eat it. And you can eat things that your dog can't (chocolate, for instance)


That goes the other way too, I, for one have no interest what-so-ever in eating my own poop...
 
2012-04-22 10:25:49 PM
Tuna scrape is removed with a spoon-like device and no further processing occurs, unlike pink slime, which is cooked, sent through a centrifuge, and sprayed with ammonia. "I don't think it's a fair comparison at all," said one seafood expert.

Yeah, it's not fair, "pink slime" went through an elaborate process to make certain that it was sterile and safe to eat, whereas "tuna scrape" seems innately problematic.

Of course, the only reason pink slime tanked is because "pink slime" is a pretty horrible moniker. The (uninformed) media blitz was awful. "Tuna scrape" just doesn't sound that bad to me. Frankly, it sounds like a casserole. People like tuna and it provides a definite context instead of making out like it is some mysterious industrial byproduct. Result: people are not going to get nearly so riled up about tuna scrape.
 
2012-04-22 10:26:10 PM

hubiestubert: We can eat earthworms easy enough. And maggots. Heck, beetles and bugs make up a part of folks diets across the world, but most of us would like it labeled. You could probably make a damn tasty rat burger, but don't try to pass it off as anything but what it is


www.topito.com
"Do you see any cows down here?"
/sizzling
 
2012-04-22 10:28:19 PM
You shouldn't be eating tuna anyways because it smells like week old roadkill.
 
2012-04-22 10:29:43 PM

sno man: hubiestubert: [wall o text]

We can eat earthworms easy enough. And maggots. Heck, beetles and bugs make up a part of folks diets across the world, but most of us would like it labeled. You could probably make a damn tasty rat burger, but don't try to pass it off as anything but what it is.

YOU might be able to make a tasty rat burger, but rodent meat is nasty, greasy and funky... There is a reason we never domesticated rodents for meat...


The capybara wasn't domesticated, but often hunted for meat. Heck, Bolivia is looking to export meat capys. Beavers were hunted for meat as well. Squirrel is damn tasty. Rat is fair often on the menu across the world. Porcupine winds up on tables fair often as well--and their fat makes for an excellent roux.

Rodents aren't domesticated because they tend to be somewhat common enough in the wild, and their tempers aren't exactly great. Not every animal is easily domesticated, but docility in captivity doesn't necessarily translate to "bad eating."
 
2012-04-22 10:32:27 PM

rewind2846: hubiestubert: We can eat earthworms easy enough. And maggots. Heck, beetles and bugs make up a part of folks diets across the world, but most of us would like it labeled. You could probably make a damn tasty rat burger, but don't try to pass it off as anything but what it is

[www.topito.com image 500x562]
"Do you see any cows down here?"
/sizzling


Glad someone picked it up. It's sad when you feed straight lines into a thread and no one pounces on them...
 
2012-04-22 10:34:18 PM
lobster was considered a mark of poverty or as a food for indentured servants or lower members of society in Maine, Massachusetts and the Canadian Maritimes, and servants specified in employment agreements that they would not eat lobster more than twice per week.[20] American lobster was initially deemed worthy only of being used as fertilizer or fish bait, and it was not until well into the twentieth century that it was viewed as more than a low-priced canned staple food


whatever
humans have eaten everything which is edible at one point or another and will probably eat it again
ffs, people eat monkey brains
 
2012-04-22 10:35:29 PM
The greatest untold story of the Baby Boom generation is what happened to canned tuna. Because we were all raised on tuna sandwiches and tuna melts in the 1950s and 1960s. And tuna surprise casseroles.

But the major brand names -- Chicken of the Sea and Starkist -- both turned to slop sometime around the 1980s. A can of tuna had no body or texture and could be spooned out of the can. "Tuna scrape" is an accurate description of 100% of the product.

We gave up tuna for our daughter (now 26) because it was such crap. Only in the last five years did we find out that Costco tuna actually had body. So it is back in the cupboard.

What is astounding is that brand names led the charge to crap product. And a generic product saved the category.
 
2012-04-22 10:38:55 PM

hubiestubert: Not every animal is easily domesticated


guns germs and steel had a great section on the requirements for domestication. great read.
 
2012-04-22 10:39:05 PM

hubiestubert: sno man: hubiestubert: [wall o text]

We can eat earthworms easy enough. And maggots. Heck, beetles and bugs make up a part of folks diets across the world, but most of us would like it labeled. You could probably make a damn tasty rat burger, but don't try to pass it off as anything but what it is.

YOU might be able to make a tasty rat burger, but rodent meat is nasty, greasy and funky... There is a reason we never domesticated rodents for meat...

The capybara wasn't domesticated, but often hunted for meat. Heck, Bolivia is looking to export meat capys. Beavers were hunted for meat as well. Squirrel is damn tasty. Rat is fair often on the menu across the world. Porcupine winds up on tables fair often as well--and their fat makes for an excellent roux.

Rodents aren't domesticated because they tend to be somewhat common enough in the wild, and their tempers aren't exactly great. Not every animal is easily domesticated, but docility in captivity doesn't necessarily translate to "bad eating."


Sorry I was merely trying to defer to your abilities as a chef, with the rat burger thing...
but I'm intrigued a little, your profile says Mass. but your (umm, wider view of edible beasties) screams not Mass.
 
2012-04-22 10:39:27 PM

MemeSlave: All of this is fixed by becoming vegetarian.


Right, because I'm definitely missing out by skipping my daily allowance of dead field mouse.
 
2012-04-22 10:41:52 PM

vodka: If you want to feed the world with these type of products (eg. meat) then you have to be willing to use every scrap available.


Really? I thought it was more if you want to feed the world with hamburgers then were going to need to air drop tractors, irrigation gear and GM seeds in to Africa whilst beating the mutters over the head when they try to complain about said GM seed.

Or vat grow the stuff.
 
2012-04-22 10:51:01 PM
Just as long as they don't start a bacon shave
 
2012-04-22 10:52:00 PM

namatad:
whatever
humans have eaten everything which is edible at one point or another and will probably eat it again
ffs, people eat monkey brains


www.wildsoundmovies.com
/chilled
 
2012-04-22 10:53:39 PM
...yet we eat hot dogs without batting an eye. Talk about double standards...
 
2012-04-22 10:56:29 PM
One of my biggest objections to Pink Slime is the vast number of individual cows that we end up eating in a single serving. It really increases the chances of rapidly spreading something like Mad Cow disease.

I'm sure this is a problem with plain old 100% ground beef too- and we should probably take steps to keep batch sizes smaller. On the plus side, food recalls could be for a thousand pounds of sausage instead of eleventy brazzillion pounds like they are now.

That said, you can pry my spicy tuna from my cold dead hands.
 
2012-04-22 10:57:07 PM

sno man: hubiestubert: sno man: hubiestubert: [wall o text]

We can eat earthworms easy enough. And maggots. Heck, beetles and bugs make up a part of folks diets across the world, but most of us would like it labeled. You could probably make a damn tasty rat burger, but don't try to pass it off as anything but what it is.

YOU might be able to make a tasty rat burger, but rodent meat is nasty, greasy and funky... There is a reason we never domesticated rodents for meat...

The capybara wasn't domesticated, but often hunted for meat. Heck, Bolivia is looking to export meat capys. Beavers were hunted for meat as well. Squirrel is damn tasty. Rat is fair often on the menu across the world. Porcupine winds up on tables fair often as well--and their fat makes for an excellent roux.

Rodents aren't domesticated because they tend to be somewhat common enough in the wild, and their tempers aren't exactly great. Not every animal is easily domesticated, but docility in captivity doesn't necessarily translate to "bad eating."

Sorry I was merely trying to defer to your abilities as a chef, with the rat burger thing...
but I'm intrigued a little, your profile says Mass. but your (umm, wider view of edible beasties) screams not Mass.


In Deerfield right now. It's been a few challenging months getting the Inn back in shape after Irene hit us.

Half of the food in my profile was while I was working for the Phoenix Coyotes, but the plated dishes are all from the Inn. Fun gig.
 
2012-04-22 10:57:13 PM

cwolf20: Just as long as they don't start a bacon shave


They do, it's called "ends and pieces" (you didn't think that bacon came out of a pig in nice rectangles did you?). They are great for seasoning skillets or as bacon bits and they are cheap.
 
2012-04-22 10:57:39 PM
..and by "hands" I mean "chopsticks".
 
2012-04-22 10:57:49 PM
Well fine, you anti-truth in food labeling wingnuts, I'm gonna go find me a source of canned cat tuna and figger out how to season it correctly so I don't get the slight metallic smell.

At least then I'll know the sh*t is PROPERLY LABELED.

Why do you hate honestly indicating what's in our food?
 
2012-04-22 10:59:44 PM
Let me ask a sharper question.

Why do you anti-labelling wingnuts hate HONESTY?
 
2012-04-22 11:06:31 PM

phrawgh: Ambivalence: sno man: Sounds like tea party think to me..."What do you mean I shouldn't eat that?!? (You commie fascist pinko bastage) How dare you tell me what I can and can't eat!! I'll show you".... nom, nom, nommmm

/wonders if that'd work with some really bad things, like 80 year old white paint chips or chunks of old pipe insulation.

Hell I'd just pay to watch those guy eat a jar of Kimchie (or however it's spelled).

Kimchi is quite delicious, BTW.


+1
 
2012-04-22 11:08:26 PM

cwolf20: Just as long as they don't start a bacon shave


Isn't that Barbasol's new scent?
 
2012-04-22 11:11:51 PM

hubiestubert: Deerfield


Knew about the stint with the 'yotes... and cool about the inn getting back up to speed!
 
2012-04-22 11:13:58 PM

sno man: hubiestubert: [wall o text]

We can eat earthworms easy enough. And maggots. Heck, beetles and bugs make up a part of folks diets across the world, but most of us would like it labeled. You could probably make a damn tasty rat burger, but don't try to pass it off as anything but what it is.

YOU might be able to make a tasty rat burger, but rodent meat is nasty, greasy and funky... There is a reason we never domesticated rodents for meat...


Um, these guinea pigs beg to differ. Or would if they could.

upload.wikimedia.org

Guinea pigs were originally domesticated for meat.

upload.wikimedia.org

Yum?

/Haven't tried it.
 
2012-04-22 11:19:10 PM

Canton: sno man: hubiestubert: [wall o text]

We can eat earthworms easy enough. And maggots. Heck, beetles and bugs make up a part of folks diets across the world, but most of us would like it labeled. You could probably make a damn tasty rat burger, but don't try to pass it off as anything but what it is.

YOU might be able to make a tasty rat burger, but rodent meat is nasty, greasy and funky... There is a reason we never domesticated rodents for meat...

Um, these guinea pigs beg to differ. Or would if they could.



Guinea pigs were originally domesticated for meat.



Yum?

/Haven't tried it.


You are correct. I forgot about those wee buggers.
 
2012-04-22 11:20:31 PM

Another Government Employee: robmilmel: First pink slime.
Now, tuna scrape.

Soon to come:

Pork Piles!!1!

You've never had scrapple?


Ugh. That reminds me of the Potted Meat Food Product a roommate and I found at the dollar store. (2 cans for a dollar, of course.) Brought it home and, one night, goaded a drunken friend into eating it. On toast, I think. It looked like cat food. He liked it and finished the whole can.

Oh, man. I feel queasy just thinking about it.
 
2012-04-22 11:22:51 PM
 
2012-04-22 11:26:48 PM

Ambivalence: Wow. It used to be marginal food was marketed to pet food manufacturers becuase it was deemed NFHC (Not for human consumption).

But fark it all, people will eat anything these days.


You are kidding, right? USED to be people would eat anything whether it swam, crawled or was scraped off the bottom of your boot, it was food and people didn't waste food. Now days we are so damn spoiled it has to be wrapped in plastic, sterilized, fed only on fresh veggies, petted, killed humanely, washed, bleached, have all flavor and anything deemed inappropriate removed from it and cooked in a sterile environment before we will eat it. What a bunch of mamby pambies we have become.
 
2012-04-22 11:30:33 PM

robmilmel: First pink slime.
Now, tuna scrape.

Soon to come:

Pork Piles!!1!


CMOT Dibbler is bringing his cart around...
 
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