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(Chron)   1 in 2 new graduates are jobless or unemployed. Then again, if they all have creative writing degrees and nose rings like this guy in the article, I can see why   (chron.com) divider line 419
    More: Obvious, baristas, graduates  
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14475 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 Apr 2012 at 3:41 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-04-22 04:00:26 PM

PainInTheASP: DId he take the nose ring out when going to interviews?

If you don't fit in with the people you will be working for and around, you better think about trying harder to fit in.

/Needless to say I lost the headbanger look quickly.


So you just put your soul in a jar and went for that corporate ring. Did you also enjoy the movie, "Who moved my cheese?"

Society does not move forward because everyone lowers their heads to the grindstones, that's how you build pyramids for the dead.

/of course being a headbanger is only slightly less douchy looking than jersey shore people.
 
2012-04-22 04:00:39 PM
Graduates in nursing, teaching, or engineering are having no problem finding jobs. Has someone pointed out to these people that they graduated with degrees that basically make them unemployable.

// Would you put someone with a nose ring in front of your customer?
 
2012-04-22 04:01:00 PM

lilplatinum: Kar98: lilplatinum: Kar98: Well, the rise of Western civilization didn't root in being able to draw farking ferns into overpriced coffee, but from the art of building shiat.

More like the art of growing plants, which doesn't indicate that being a farmer is the highest goal today.

More like, not? You don't build empires by growing cabbages.

The "root" of western civilization was when people stopped being transient and started growing their own food, only then did they start building shiat.

Not that any of that has any bearing on a jobs value today.


'k, so let's try to have a healthy economy based on cutting each others hair and drawing ferns into coffee.
 
TWX
2012-04-22 04:01:00 PM

PainInTheASP: DId he take the nose ring out when going to interviews?

Here's a helpful bit of advice that one of my counselors gave me right before I graduated: Go to a supermarket and look around you. If you are going into a career that wil be interacting with the public on a regular basis, these will be the people you will work for. Your hairstyle, jewlery choices, fashion sense all play a role in these people's view of you. It may not be right, but it is a fact.

If you don't fit in with the people you will be working for and around, you better think about trying harder to fit in.

/Needless to say I lost the headbanger look quickly.


Yeah... I've had long hair since I was 17, but computer geeks in the late nineties often had long hair, so it wasn't too much of an issue. One potential employer asked me during the interview if I'd cut it, and even after I answered negatively they still hired me.

In my case I know that if I absolutely have to I could have my hair cut. I don't have any modifications though, so no holes to plug or ink to try to cover up. I understood from a fairly young age that people would judge me based on how I look before they would judge me based on any other trait, so I figured that long hair was the furthest I could go at that point.

Now I have a beard that's more than two inches long, and my wife is bugging me to get it trimmed back. I might just do that at some point soon. I also understand that if I desire new work at a different employer I might have to shave it, or at least ensure it's styled in a way that doesn't give an air of distrust. I just don't like the maintenance of shaving daily.
 
2012-04-22 04:01:02 PM
FTA

a lot of young graduates have shown up at job placement centers in tears

That's the kind of can-do attitude that employers are after.

If Im hiring through a placement center, I hope they show me the professional courtesy of pointing out to me the ones that came in blubbering.
 
2012-04-22 04:01:23 PM

mc_madness: Get your kids focused on a healthcare profession.

America is getting fatter and older and Americans generally take shiatty care of themselves.

Healthcare profession jobs are guaranteed bank and fun.


Csb...

Before I received my degree in accounting, I used to work as a sales rep for a propane company. One of my larger clients was an elderly care home. I was taking a walk around their facility with the chief engineer when he was pulled away for an emergency phone call. As I was sitting in a hallway waiting, an old man with dementia approached me slowly, while babbling something and reaching out his hand. I thought maybe he needed help steadying himself, so I reached out to grad his hand. It was damp. He was wearing a hospital gown and I saw brown liquid running down his leg. I looked at my hand, and it had brown liquid on it.

Not all healthcare jobs are fun. In fact, I'd guess very few jobs in that field are fun. At least not for me. I love talking about money, so being a CPA is more my speed. And I never have to deal with anyone's piss or poop as a part of my job.
 
2012-04-22 04:02:04 PM
Why are these kids looking for a job right after graduation? Shouldn't they be taking a year or so to find themselves and touring Europe?
Pssst, hint, the military is always looking for educated folks.
 
2012-04-22 04:02:25 PM

Digital Communist: There is a lot of creativity in engineering, you get to design and build things that never existed before.


Yeah, and instead of the hot little co-ed girls in your class you get a bunch of asian kids and indian teachers who can barely speak english...
 
2012-04-22 04:03:22 PM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: The difference... I do not see it


The Chron f'd up. This news story is in every paper and newscast today. All the rest of them used the headline:

1 in 2 new graduates are jobless or underemployed


Chron has since updated the headline. Perhaps they should hire this creative writer/barista to check their work for them.
 
2012-04-22 04:03:28 PM

Fluorescent Testicle: Fark It: But the snowflake generation doesn't do any of that, they come out of college without any job experience and expect the jobs to fall in their laps.

To be fair, many colleges nowadays don't show much interest in helping their students gain any sort of practical knowledge that might be useful post-graduation, and the recession certainly doesn't help the job situation any. Of course, this douchebag doesn't really apply to any of that, so y'know.


Heh. I was an art major (photography) in college. The best practical knowledge I ever got from my class was when the teacher asked us "how many of you want to be a professional artist" of course we all raised our hands. she pointed to one kid and said "you can keep your hand up, the rest of you lower yours. Based on the averages one person from this class will make it as a professional artist. The rest of you will not. Sorry"

\from that day on i decided to hedge my bet a bit. I still work in art and like what i do. But my personal stuff is more of a hobby now.
 
2012-04-22 04:03:39 PM
We're hiring people by the dozen... just not writers, painters, musicians, poets, or sculptors. They're called "starving artists" for a reason.
 
2012-04-22 04:03:46 PM
My team has been trying to hire solid Software Engineers for Test positions for months, we even gave away
BACON
 
2012-04-22 04:03:55 PM

Kar98: 'k, so let's try to have a healthy economy based on cutting each others hair and drawing ferns into coffee


Society needs all kinds of thing to function. If everyone studied engineering we would kind of have some other deficiencies as well.
 
2012-04-22 04:03:55 PM
Just getting a degree is not enough, especially when EVERYONE ELSE is also getting one. If there's something you want to do, you need to make a plan and go for it. It will also be really helpful if you do some things while you're in school to make you stand out from the other 25,000 people in your enormous state school--enroll in an honors program or society, find internships, part time jobs, volunteering opportunities, etc, etc. and always get help from the career center to write your resume!

I have several close friends who graduated from a huge state school in the past couple of years. The one with the most liberal arts of liberal arts degrees has been fully employed for a year. The only one who is not employed has a science degree but didn't do any extracurricular activities, didn't get help with a resume, didn't look for internships, or do anything else to help himself get a job after school. I know this is anecdotal evidence and not data, but it seems pretty common sense to me. It seems like a lot of these kids who whine about not finding work are expecting companies to just gift them $50,000/yr jobs with no work experience or even any volunteer or other leadership experience--just a piece of paper that says they are able to show up regularly for 4 years. It just isn't going to happen kids. You actually have to make an effort to get noticed and hired for good opportunities, especially if you don't have a degree that taught you a trade.

Also there is no shame in working retail or being a barista. Having a college degree doesn't actually make you better than anybody else--especially not right now. I've seen too many people who could hardly string two words together get college degrees to be particularly impressed by that achievement.
 
2012-04-22 04:03:55 PM
It always seems to be that when they write articles like this they find the biggest asshole they can who graduated with a pointless degree that wouldn't find a job in any economy and write off the entire statistic. I wish I had done this from the beginning, but I've been planning my career around demand. Original college path was to go to law school. Always loved to politics and debate and knew it'd make a great fit. But once I finished up my senior year, I realized that even graduates from law school weren't finding jobs because the market is saturated and now in $120k in debt. Thankfully, I had combined my Political Science degree with Social Studies and now have a wide opportunity to go into secondary special education, a field I really enjoy and appreciate.

Still want to do the law school thing, but will pursue it once I get my years experience in and specialize in Education Law.

/have a job when I graduate
//please stop pursuing sports management and women's studies at STATE.
 
2012-04-22 04:06:35 PM
I see a lot of talk of an "Engineering" degree, but no one ever mentions specifics. Chemical? Electrical? Structural? Network?

I did a lot of engineering in WoW while I still played, I wonder if that counts...
 
2012-04-22 04:07:16 PM

lilplatinum: I learned something fairly useless and my employment is completely unrelated to having it. I was a liberal arts major - the people you were telling to "learn something useful.


The point was more against anyone, regardless of which degree they chose, whining that they can't get a job out of college. College is a waste of money for most people, including, as it turned out, for myself. Why are we arguing? You call what you learned in college fairly useless and irrelevant to your employment. Wouldn't you have been better off without all the student loan debt?


MayContainHorseGluten: Nothing's useless in knowledge or skills. What makes something seem useless is if you gain no skills in being able to apply your knowledge and skills. Most people laugh at the degree I got, but the path it took me down led me to work I enjoyed doing, was unique, didn't pay well at first (but paid the bills), then later panned out to make a ton of money.


"Useless" probably was too strong a word given that I agree that all skills and knowledge *can* be useful. But as with lilplatinum, what I learned while in college was, indeed, useless for my current job... unless you want to count my ability to *act* like a more team-based member of society than I really am in order to get through interviews. One might even make the case that the rigors of lab are useful in troubleshooting.
 
2012-04-22 04:07:43 PM

p the boiler: I get it you were a nerd, people picked on you and now you are an engineer so you want to try to be the bully.


We get it. You were a cool kid in school, took some BS degree so you could party and you're bitter about not having a high paying job handed to you. Could you please hurry up with my coffee?
 
2012-04-22 04:07:50 PM

lilplatinum: Digital Communist: There is a lot of creativity in engineering, you get to design and build things that never existed before.

Yeah, and instead of the hot little co-ed girls in your class you get a bunch of asian kids and indian teachers who can barely speak english...


Absolutely. If you want to get laid a lot take advertising. It's not like it's hard getting laid in college no matter what program you are in. Even if you are surrounded by guys.

You could always take chemical engineering which is at least 50% women. Stay away from computer science if you are too lazy to pick up outside the lab.
 
2012-04-22 04:08:13 PM

Fluorescent Testicle: Fark It: But the snowflake generation doesn't do any of that, they come out of college without any job experience and expect the jobs to fall in their laps.

To be fair, many colleges nowadays don't show much interest in helping their students gain any sort of practical knowledge that might be useful post-graduation, and the recession certainly doesn't help the job situation any. Of course, this douchebag doesn't really apply to any of that, so y'know.


Just saw this first hand with the last apprentice I had down in the beer mines. Dude had taken the big brewing science program at Seibel. He sought out the apprenticeship himself because the school itself, while saying he should, they also told him he didn't really need to, And didn't offer any type of placement service.

While I recommended that he be hired, we didn't really have anything open for him at the time. AFAIK he's currently with one of the local distribution companies cleaning beer lines.

at least he's kinda in the business and I hope something opens up for him
 
2012-04-22 04:09:15 PM
I'm starting college this fall at a top university and the thought of not finding a job after graduation stresses the shiat out of me even now. It may be the fact that in the back of my head I know my major is not particularly lucrative in most cases or that my long-term plan for my life doesn't look as good as it did a few years ago (poli sci major that wanted to go to law school but with the legal market the way it is...). I don't consider myself part of the "snowflakes" that just want success to rain down on them due to the fact that the possess a degree either, I've had a difficult life and I've always worked hard in networking and career planning yet I still feel tons of pressure knowing that I might still end up unemployed.

I don't know if this awareness is a positive or a negative but I do know that not everyone is as careful and some people are getting balls deep in debt to study photography and expect to make a living out of that.

/some career advice other than "study engineering" would be greatly appreciated.
 
2012-04-22 04:09:29 PM

Atomic Spunk:
Not all healthcare jobs are fun. In fact, I'd guess very few jobs in that field are fun. At least not for me. I love talking about money, so being a CPA is more my speed. And I never have to deal with anyone's piss or poop as a part of my job.


yellow and brown = green
 
2012-04-22 04:10:24 PM

JorgiX: I'm starting college this fall at a top university and the thought of not finding a job after graduation stresses the shiat out of me even now. It may be the fact that in the back of my head I know my major is not particularly lucrative in most cases or that my long-term plan for my life doesn't look as good as it did a few years ago (poli sci major that wanted to go to law school but with the legal market the way it is...). I don't consider myself part of the "snowflakes" that just want success to rain down on them due to the fact that the possess a degree either, I've had a difficult life and I've always worked hard in networking and career planning yet I still feel tons of pressure knowing that I might still end up unemployed.

I don't know if this awareness is a positive or a negative but I do know that not everyone is as careful and some people are getting balls deep in debt to study photography and expect to make a living out of that.

/some career advice other than "study engineering" would be greatly appreciated.


become a doctor
 
2012-04-22 04:11:01 PM

Atomic Spunk: I love talking about money, so being a CPA is more my speed. And I never have to deal with anyone's piss or poop as a part of my job.


I'm a CPA. I have to deal with people's shiat all the time.
 
2012-04-22 04:11:21 PM

mc_madness: Atomic Spunk:
Not all healthcare jobs are fun. In fact, I'd guess very few jobs in that field are fun. At least not for me. I love talking about money, so being a CPA is more my speed. And I never have to deal with anyone's piss or poop as a part of my job.

yellow and brown = green


that is freaking awesome, can I use it (giving you full credit of course)?
 
2012-04-22 04:11:40 PM

chaoswolf: The point was more against anyone, regardless of which degree they chose, whining that they can't get a job out of college. College is a waste of money for most people, including, as it turned out, for myself. Why are we arguing? You call what you learned in college fairly useless and irrelevant to your employment. Wouldn't you have been better off without all the student loan debt?


Probably, but I had a lot of fun and worked in school and didn't do something stupid like pay private school tuition for a liberal arts degree. All in all my 3 year bender was probably worth with.. better to get the cocaine habit out of your system before you get a job where you can afford to maintain it over a long period of time.
 
2012-04-22 04:12:08 PM

LordZorch: Perhaps if studied engineering he'd have a nice paycheck coming in every two weeks and he could fritter his time away writing short stories as a hobby


Not everyone can or should become a science type guy. I couldn't do math if my or life depended on me adding, subtracting or dividing any combination of numbers.

I should not be doing engineer work. I recognize that.

there I just saved your life.
 
2012-04-22 04:14:03 PM

mc_madness: Get your kids focused on a healthcare profession.

America is getting fatter and older and Americans generally take shiatty care of themselves.

Healthcare profession jobs are guaranteed bank and fun.


THIS. I've been trying to hire an OT, PT, nurses and aides for almost a year. The ads have run without interruption and the cash is pretty good. PTs and OTs can earn around $75 for a single home visit and can book up to six Medicare clients a day. Paying a PT from a traveling health care company almost $100 an hour right now.

We're crying for ancillary health care workers- nurse are nice too but PTs and OTs are golden.

Don't know about that fun part at times. If I wanted to deal with this much regulation I'd have been a lawyer.
 
2012-04-22 04:14:07 PM

lilplatinum: Probably, but I had a lot of fun and worked in school and didn't do something stupid like pay private school tuition for a liberal arts degree. All in all my 3 year bender was probably worth with.. better to get the cocaine habit out of your system before you get a job where you can afford to maintain it over a long period of time.


Understood and agreed. Army paid for the years I went to college. I could go back tuition free but I keep asking myself, "why?"
 
2012-04-22 04:14:48 PM
So i am 'graduating' next week with a certification in Software Engineering from the local college. I have an ancient BS in Electrical Engineering and 30 years of experience in communications engineering and programming but nothing since 2009. I live near Detroit. Am I screwed?
 
2012-04-22 04:17:04 PM

Mayor Bee: Atomic Spunk: I love talking about money, so being a CPA is more my speed. And I never have to deal with anyone's piss or poop as a part of my job.

I'm a CPA. I have to deal with people's shiat all the time.


I'm currently representing 3 clients who are being audited and I have 2 clients who are applying for OICs, so I hear what you're saying. But the shiat we deal with doesn't leave a stain on the office chairs and it doesn't carry e. coli or salmonella, so I'm fine with it.

/germophobe
 
2012-04-22 04:17:06 PM
Go buy a weed eater and a lawnmower. I don't care if my lawn care guy has a nose ring.
 
2012-04-22 04:18:01 PM

Gramma: I live near Detroit. Am I screwed?


Obviously.
 
2012-04-22 04:18:12 PM

TomD9938: FTA

a lot of young graduates have shown up at job placement centers in tears

That's the kind of can-do attitude that employers are after.

If Im hiring through a placement center, I hope they show me the professional courtesy of pointing out to me the ones that came in blubbering.


Job placement center candidates are a mixed bag. I had one get angry whent I would not consider her for hire. She shoved the chairs around and swore. Sat in the parking lot for 30 minutes yelling on the phone to some poor soul. Could not understand why I wouldn't give her a chance to work one on one with vulnerable adults.
 
2012-04-22 04:18:16 PM
My brother-in-law has never really held a good job, in part because he fell for the old saw "Do what you love." Like a lot of people, he seems to believe that you should be able to work at something you LOVE to do, and enjoy doing; and that people get up every morning and go to work because they love what they do and being there. So that when he gets a job and doesn't like it, it's because it's the "wrong job" and then he either quits or gets fired; because obviously if you hate working there, why do it?

Let's face it, very few people get to do something they love; and even fewer love their jobs 100% of the time. "Doing what you love" is this rainbow people chase while they think they hate their current jobs; or, like the people in this article, never work while they look for that perfect job they could love. The only worse thing to do is to do something you really don't like because that's where the money is: "No, I don't really enjoy programming/business/tax law, but my advisor at school said that's where they're hiring, so that's what I'm studying."

The trick is to find something you enjoy; and it will become something you "love"; but nobody likes working. We'd all rather be independently wealthy and be able to ski or lie on the beach all day. Hell, even Stephen King decided he was tired of writing, and that guy has enough money never to write again. But give up the idea that you can "do what you love" because eventually you'll hate it.
 
2012-04-22 04:18:51 PM
According to Fark, we'd have zero unemployment if everyone was an engineer or a doctor. Brilliant.
 
2012-04-22 04:18:54 PM

Fark It: A creative writing degree would be useful if you had maybe done internships for an ad agency, or planned on getting a job with a publisher. Then go after people who hire writers with your resume, references in hand. Where do most creative writers get jobs? How much do they make out of college? These are questions you need to ask yourself no matter what field you're getting in to.

But the snowflake generation doesn't do any of that, they come out of college without any job experience and expect the jobs to fall in their laps.


You remind me of the background of Salman Rushdie, who apparently wrote ad copy for an agency in India at one point. And of course Kurt Vonnegut was a flak and a hack for GE and others. But that was then and this is now.

//No, not bitter, thankful that my elementary English-writing skills can support me in Jakarta, turning out dreary annual reports, company profiles, video scripts yadda yadda while I look at the ghostly hologram of that novel that might or might not ever get writ.
 
2012-04-22 04:19:22 PM
I've got a buddy with a Creative Writing degree that was unemployed for over a year. He complained that "All the writing jobs are for marketing".

No shiat? Did you think there was a huge market for someone to write short stories?
 
2012-04-22 04:19:45 PM
As a barista in Seattle, I am getting a kick.
 
2012-04-22 04:19:55 PM
As a recent graduate, I find this rather silly. I had a job within two weeks of graduating with a degree in English from a public university. I work at a call center for a cable company doing tech support, which pays pretty well (22k per year after tax) and has good benefits.

I don't understand why people limit themselves to jobs that only utilize the degree they have. Most employers don't care if you have a degree in English or Engineering, as long as you have one or some decent work experience.

Before you cry "Oh woe is me!" about the job market, start applying for any opportunity that is remotely relative to your skill set. I guess more and more people my age are prone to wanting to live at home with mommy and daddy until they can get their $50k a year dream job.

/dnrtfa
 
2012-04-22 04:21:48 PM

antidisestablishmentarianism: Fark It: But the snowflake generation doesn't do any of that, they come out of college without any job experience and expect the jobs to fall in their laps.

In 6th grade we had to do a research paper on what job we wanted, what the demand would be, and what kind of salary we would expect to make. It was a good exercise that we had to repeat in 8th grade. I wanted to be an EE, I had a decent job before I graduated.

Not bashing Lib Arts majors. My brother graduated with a degree in Jazz Therapy and now is working 4 hours a day on a cruise ship, seeing the world while all his meals and lodging are paid for him. If he is smart with his money he can retire from there or at least forge some good relationships with established studio musicians.

My Ex graduated with a degree in stage management and now is a stage manager at our local preforming arts center. She didn't get the job on her first try but she didn't give up. I think she had been out of school for 4 years before she got the job.

TL;DR - It's not the degree, it's the individuals hard work.

/very few good jobs fall into your lap


Except you don't want to forget about blow-jobs.
 
2012-04-22 04:21:53 PM

JorgiX: I'm starting college this fall at a top university and the thought of not finding a job after graduation stresses the shiat out of me even now. It may be the fact that in the back of my head I know my major is not particularly lucrative in most cases or that my long-term plan for my life doesn't look as good as it did a few years ago (poli sci major that wanted to go to law school but with the legal market the way it is...). I don't consider myself part of the "snowflakes" that just want success to rain down on them due to the fact that the possess a degree either, I've had a difficult life and I've always worked hard in networking and career planning yet I still feel tons of pressure knowing that I might still end up unemployed.

I don't know if this awareness is a positive or a negative but I do know that not everyone is as careful and some people are getting balls deep in debt to study photography and expect to make a living out of that.

/some career advice other than "study engineering" would be greatly appreciated.


Don't put in the bare minimum into your studies
Do try to find a part time job related to what you are interested in doing while in school
Look at companies in your area that might be a good fit - see if they have internships (if you are not going to school year round)

The piece of paper will open a lot of doors - if you know how to make use of it. Paper + experience wins out everytime (if you aren't an ass at the interview)

/Has the experience, now getting the piece of paper
 
2012-04-22 04:22:03 PM

Atomic Spunk: Mayor Bee: Atomic Spunk: I love talking about money, so being a CPA is more my speed. And I never have to deal with anyone's piss or poop as a part of my job.

I'm a CPA. I have to deal with people's shiat all the time.

I'm currently representing 3 clients who are being audited and I have 2 clients who are applying for OICs, so I hear what you're saying. But the shiat we deal with doesn't leave a stain on the office chairs and it doesn't carry e. coli or salmonella, so I'm fine with it.

/germophobe


As someone finishing up my undergrad in accounting and jumping right into my Master's and multiple employers already talking about job offers after I get my graduate degree, I'd say that as far as job placement, accountants have it better than those precious engineers...
/There are 3 things certain in life
//Death, Taxes, and jobs for accountants
 
2012-04-22 04:22:31 PM
Regardless of major, many college graduates are morans - much like the majority of people. When going to a university was a competitive and scholastic venture, it might have made a big difference. Drinking your way to a BA degree in business or other terribly specific market without bothering to get some actual experience is going to cause problems.

When 50% of applicants have a university degree, having a university degree is just going to be the minimum criteria.
 
2012-04-22 04:22:52 PM

p the boiler: I love the Lib Arts bashing. I get it you were a nerd, people picked on you and now you are an engineer so you want to try to be the bully.


Yes...and lets see the Engineer people come down to my area of Florida and see if they can find work after NASA scaled down.

All this push for Science and Math degrees in a service-based economy is GOP Business Socialist nonsense. As one manager of a business so succinctly put it: "Why do I want to hire a Mathematician at $70,000 when I can use the calculator on my cell phone to do my computations?"
 
2012-04-22 04:23:10 PM

mc_madness: Atomic Spunk:
Not all healthcare jobs are fun. In fact, I'd guess very few jobs in that field are fun. At least not for me. I love talking about money, so being a CPA is more my speed. And I never have to deal with anyone's piss or poop as a part of my job.

yellow and brown = green


Brilliant! Seriously, people in the healthcare profession should be well compensated. Especially those who deal with patients who are near to death. It must take some incredible mental fortitude to get to know patients and then watch them slowly die.
 
2012-04-22 04:23:18 PM
Some of you fail at economics. Having a better degree will not magically make the unemployment rate go down, it just makes you far more likely to be in that percentage that's employed. If everyone graduated with engineering degrees, that would just mean half of those engineering majors would be sitting at home unemployed.
 
2012-04-22 04:23:22 PM

LordZorch:
On the other hand, Boeing is hiring like mad. Perhaps if studied engineering he'd have a nice paycheck coming in every two weeks and he could fritter his time away writing short stories as a hobby...


That include interns?
 
2012-04-22 04:23:40 PM

JorgiX: /some career advice other than "study engineering" would be greatly appreciated.


It's really not as doomsday as people claim it to be. The real issue is that there is a generation of people who think that jobs will fall into their lab when they get a degree regardless of the quality of the university or quality the major. If you treat school as job training (which it is definitely meant to be), then you'll realize your goal is to learn the skills that will help you land the career you want. If you come out of college with no useable skills then you have failed.

If you are going to a top school and you do well, people will want to hire you for your respective major. Be assured, that good students from good law schools still get hired.The real question is if you get into that law school, how much debt will you accrue and how long will that put a damper on your life. There are a lot of good and mediocre students from poor schools that can't find jobs to stay above their debt.

Every few months, someone else makes a list of the jobs with the biggest recruit potential. You'll probably be miserable if you picked your career from there. My best advice is go to college and for once in your life think broadly. Take a lot of classes in different departments and figure out what you actually want to do. Work for free in research labs, non profits and everything in between so you can see what that career is actually like.

Figure out what will make you happy over the next 60 years of your life, then simply go after it.
 
2012-04-22 04:24:14 PM

lilplatinum: mc_madness: America is getting fatter and older and Americans generally take shiatty care of themselves.

Healthcare profession jobs are guaranteed bank and fun.

Yeah, nothing is more fun than dealing with fat old people.


You forgot "rich" and "mean" and "demanding" and "cranky".
 
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