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(The Verge)   James Cameron's next project might be a remake of 'Armageddon'   (theverge.com) divider line 115
    More: Cool, James Cameron, gross world product, Tom Jones, NASA missions, Technology Review, asteroid mining, Nikon, space tourism  
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13642 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Apr 2012 at 10:47 AM (3 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



115 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2012-04-19 12:37:39 AM  
Farking cool.
 
2012-04-19 12:54:38 AM  
media.tumblr.com
 
2012-04-19 12:58:05 AM  
The one with the gerbil?
 
2012-04-19 03:01:10 AM  
phlegmmo: The one with the gerbil?

Now with audio goodness.

Link
 
2012-04-19 08:56:36 AM  
Quickly, revive Aerosmith!
 
2012-04-19 09:37:11 AM  
There is no possible way anything could go wrong.
 
2012-04-19 09:47:04 AM  
Coming soon" Dances with ET
 
2012-04-19 10:36:34 AM  
Hopefully with more Space Dementia
 
2012-04-19 10:42:42 AM  
Isn't it standard to hold a remake until such a time that you couldn't make it with the original cast?
 
2012-04-19 10:50:10 AM  
Why would you mess with something that's already perfect? Come on now.
 
2012-04-19 10:51:38 AM  
Really? Does Hollywood have an original thought in their head?
 
2012-04-19 10:53:37 AM  
Does anyone else think the company's logo looks like a vulva? Maybe I'm just experiencing sexual deprivation hallucinations.
 
2012-04-19 10:55:00 AM  
hmm, interesting. thankfully this has nothing to do with the movie except they are wanting to mine asteriods

only one ittsy bitsy problem.. we cant launch anyone into orbit just yet, yet alone to an asteriod to start mining.

wouldnt be shocked to hear though they are in discussions with spacex
 
2012-04-19 10:55:24 AM  

SoCalSurfer: Really? Does Hollywood have an original thought in their head?


How's this for an original thought?: RTFA.
 
2012-04-19 10:55:41 AM  
Beaver1224, TheLopper and SoCalSurfer didn't even bother to skim TFA.
 
2012-04-19 10:56:22 AM  
The only reason to watch that is Steve Buscemi.
 
2012-04-19 10:57:13 AM  

Because People in power are Stupid: Hopefully with more Space Dementia


And monkeys.
 
2012-04-19 10:58:03 AM  

The Envoy: SoCalSurfer: Really? Does Hollywood have an original thought in their head?

How's this for an original thought?: RTFA.


I would love to if the farking server would respond!
 
2012-04-19 11:00:57 AM  
Asteroid mining is not cost effective in bringing materials back to earth and landing them on the surface. It is cost effective in bringing raw materials back to orbital stations and shipyards because until we install a space elevator or rail-gun getting 'stuff' into orbit is just too damn expensive.

Now if they were planning on building a large station at L5 than yes, an asteroid mining project would assist with that.
 
2012-04-19 11:01:00 AM  

durbnpoisn: The Envoy: SoCalSurfer: Really? Does Hollywood have an original thought in their head?

How's this for an original thought?: RTFA.

I would love to if the farking server would respond!


Ok, well kattana got the gist of it up above. They may be setting up an asteroid mining company.
 
2012-04-19 11:01:07 AM  
Damn you phlegmmo.
 
2012-04-19 11:05:22 AM  
I've played Belter...it's all good until you have to ship in strike-busting goons to get your mines working again.

/GDW ftw
 
2012-04-19 11:05:40 AM  

phlegmmo: The one with the gerbil?


Came for this. Leaving satisfied.

but sore.
 
2012-04-19 11:10:11 AM  
"In 2005, Diamandis appeared at TED describing an extraterrestrial environment where 'everything we hold of value on this planet - metal and minerals and real estate and energy' are available in 'infinite quantities.'"

Um, someone doesn't understand the definition of "infinite" or has a better understanding of theoretical physics than all of humankind and has solved the entropy dilemma.
 
2012-04-19 11:10:31 AM  
I believe the Bad Astronomer covered this yesterday.
 
2012-04-19 11:11:59 AM  
Asteroid mining? Meh, wake me when we start planet cracking.
 
2012-04-19 11:13:46 AM  
Phil scooped this one yesterday.

IF that is really what they are announcing, it's cool. Risky as hell, but so was sailing to India for spices at one point. The trick is to find something worth enough to make the risk balance out with the profit. We've got enough iron on Earth, and while Gold has high prices, a few tons dumped on the market would crash that market - it's not really something that gets used up or expended that much. Maybe some rare earth minerals, or as mentioned above, raw material for building "up the well".

The latter option would be an interesting "long game" approach. Start developing the tech now, and when it is needed, you have a 10 - 20 year head start on everyone else. Again, risky, but if you could totally dominate a market somewhere that doesn't really have anti-trust laws yet . . .
 
2012-04-19 11:16:45 AM  
I wouldn't get your hopes up. Their plan consists of flying to an asteroid, planting a flag, and saying "Mine!"
 
2012-04-19 11:17:46 AM  
REPEAT
 
2012-04-19 11:18:06 AM  
Did that movie address why it was easier to train oil drillers to be astronauts than to train astronauts to drill a hole?
 
2012-04-19 11:26:33 AM  

madgonad: until we install a space elevator or rail-gun getting 'stuff' into orbit is just too damn expensive.


You realize that a railgun launch system would liquify any human payloads from acceleration to orbital speeds + whatever speed you need to overcome drag until you reach orbit. Straight up through the thickest parts of the atmosphere followed by a gravity assisted turn to orbit would be far more fuel efficient. Thats why we do it with chemical rockets.

A space elevator would require materials beyond the tensile strengths of anything we have today. Carbon nanotubes COULD be strong enough, if we could make the tubes the length of the elevator cable instead of a few inches long. But that also doesn't account for atmospheric loads, the load of the climbers on the cable, or it's durability against orbital debris hitting it (Lets face it, you can't move it out of the way).

I also wonder about the oscillations that would be setup by the cable being in the atmosphere. They could easily grow exponentially large and tear the cable apart

/Space elevators are nothing more then neat plot devices for books.
//The real problem with asteroid mining is that when you dump a million metric tons of rare earth onto the market, the value tanks and it's no longer profitable to mine asteroids.
 
2012-04-19 11:27:25 AM  
I wonder what the return on investment would be on this long term. A 20 trillion dollar project, if I invested a few thousand in this, I could be all set in 30 years.
 
2012-04-19 11:28:20 AM  

Mugato: Did that movie address why it was easier to train oil drillers to be astronauts than to train astronauts to drill a hole?


Roughnecks have a hard job to do. Astronauts just go through checklists and flick switches apparently. That oil drilling equipment must weigh a HUGE amount when held in place by the microgravity of an asteroid. Astronauts probably couldn't lift the equipment in such an environment
 
2012-04-19 11:31:23 AM  

Snarfangel: I wouldn't get your hopes up. Their plan consists of flying to an asteroid, planting a flag, and saying "Mine!"


cdn3.hark.com

Mine?
 
2012-04-19 11:31:48 AM  

9beers: Farking cool.


Favorited: bad taste.
 
2012-04-19 11:33:33 AM  
That's gayer than a fanny pack full of dicks.
 
2012-04-19 11:38:06 AM  
There's a lot of big names and big money behind this thing. Looks like their serious about whatever it is they want to accomplish out in the void.
 
2012-04-19 11:40:51 AM  

eugene'slament: Looks like their serious about whatever it is they want to accomplish out in the void.


Completely demolishing the commodities market that funded their venture?
 
2012-04-19 11:45:45 AM  
Well technically no one has stated the exact intent of this venture. Various people within the venture have expressed interest in the past about asteroid mining. However the article states that there is a public announcement on April 24 in which the intents of said venture will be revealed.
 
2012-04-19 11:48:34 AM  
Armagedditon?

/ obscure?
// no.
 
2012-04-19 11:49:20 AM  

Because People in power are Stupid: Hopefully with more Space Dementia


"Did I tell you to strap me to a chair while I'm trying to shoot you in a vacuum environment?"
 
2012-04-19 11:49:47 AM  
Cameron >>>>> Bay but I can't imagine a more uninspired movie for him to (re)make.

Too bad he and Ridley Scott aren't collaborating on Prometheus/future media from the Alien (maybe full-on AVP) universe.

Beaver1224: Isn't it standard to hold a remake until such a time that you couldn't make it with the original cast?


It farking should be.
 
2012-04-19 11:51:54 AM  
Oh, and anyone considering getting into asteroid mining at this point in history is a moron, unless they're part of developing the tech first.
/rtfa, what is this Reddit?
 
2012-04-19 11:52:39 AM  
"Well, who's gonna finance this?"

"Bear takes care of this."
 
2012-04-19 11:52:40 AM  

Crotchrocket Slim: Cameron >>>>> Bay but I can't imagine a more uninspired movie for him to (re)make.

Too bad he and Ridley Scott aren't collaborating on Prometheus/future media from the Alien (maybe full-on AVP) universe.

Beaver1224: Isn't it standard to hold a remake until such a time that you couldn't make it with the original cast?

It farking should be.


it should also be a rule that the illiterate should not be allowed to post on FARK
 
2012-04-19 11:53:09 AM  

fluffy2097: eugene'slament: Looks like their serious about whatever it is they want to accomplish out in the void.

Completely demolishing the commodities market that funded their venture?


Actually there are a couple of things that we simply don't have a big enough supply of here on earth. H3 has climbed to $2,000 a litre because we need more than we have.
 
2012-04-19 11:54:42 AM  

Voiceofreason01: it should also be a rule that the illiterate should not be allowed to post on FARK


If you can't read, how can you write?

Not only would you not know how to work a keyboard if you were illiterate, you wouldn't be able to sign up for a fark account or find the "add comment" button.

/Everyone on the internet has some level of literacy.
 
2012-04-19 11:55:08 AM  
Purvis: What's in-farking-side me?

Ripley: There's a monster in your chest. These guys hijacked your ship, and they sold your cryo tube to this... human. And he put an alien inside of you. It's a really nasty one. And in a few hours it's gonna burst through your ribcage, and you're gonna die. Any questions?

Purvis: Who are you?
 
2012-04-19 11:56:50 AM  

Snarfangel: I wouldn't get your hopes up. Their plan consists of flying to an asteroid, planting a flag, and saying "Mine!"


Asteroid mine-ing, brilliant!

fluffy2097: You realize that a railgun launch system would liquify any human payloads from acceleration to orbital speeds + whatever speed you need to overcome drag until you reach orbit. Straight up through the thickest parts of the atmosphere followed by a gravity assisted turn to orbit would be far more fuel efficient. Thats why we do it with chemical rockets.


Right there with you on space elevators. OTOH, it's not too hard to conceive of railguns used for cargo while still keeping chem rockets around for human transport. Sure, you're couldn't afford to finance a mass exodus that way, but presumably by the time that's gonna happen we'll have figured out some kind of clean fusion engines anyway. Also not sure about the acceleration problem - I thought I read if the rail's long enough acceleration can be spread out, but it has to go up the right shape of west mountain slope to work. Maybe only once you also invoke scramjets (yes, i know, still chemical) to top off the speed?
 
2012-04-19 11:57:07 AM  

pxsteel: Actually there are a couple of things that we simply don't have a big enough supply of here on earth. H3 has climbed to $2,000 a litre because we need more than we have.


Somehow I doubt helium is going to be a major component of what we extract from an asteroid. Lots of iron, nickle, and rare earth. I'm no chemist but wouldn't the helium (if it even was found in a liquid or solid on the asteroid) boil off and be lost to space when the asteroid is heated by the sun?
 
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