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(ARTnews)   Skulls with encrusted diamonds, the Pope struck by a meteor, nudes with distorted breasts, soiled toys and sheets, ants crawling on a cross. Bad taste is good business in the art world   (artnews.com) divider line 29
    More: Ironic, Damien Hirst, pope, john waters, contemporary art, Museum of Modern Art, Tracey Emin, seriousness, Museum of Bad Art  
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2280 clicks; posted to Business » on 18 Apr 2012 at 3:21 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-04-18 12:01:26 PM
All ye who post are blessed
deadword.com
 
2012-04-18 12:48:02 PM
I'm investing in the "Dogs Playing Poker" style of art. It's printed on real velvet! The value can only go up!
 
2012-04-18 12:55:07 PM
worthless article without at least a slide show
TL;DR
 
2012-04-18 01:39:37 PM
So it's like an Ed Hardy tshirt?
 
2012-04-18 02:18:44 PM
Bad taste may fill the museums, but no taste truly brings in the money.
 
2012-04-18 02:24:35 PM

Cagey B: Bad taste may fill the museums, but no taste truly brings in the money.

www.faithmouse.com
 
2012-04-18 03:29:45 PM
Sounds like a party.
 
2012-04-18 03:54:03 PM

Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: I'm investing in the "Dogs Playing Poker" style of art. It's printed on real velvet! The value can only go up!


You should branch out more. I am invested heavily in the velvet painting market. You should see my collection of bullfighters, Elvis and crying clowns. Im going to retire in a few years thanks to those babies!
 
2012-04-18 04:00:33 PM
The art world makes no sense to me. My senior year of mechanical engineering we did an independent study class with the art department, primarily to teach the art students how to weld, build things that wouldn't fall over, shiat like that. In return, we had to make "art" with the help of the art students. I made a few things, but the first thing, the very first thing I made was a paper mache` mold of a hammer I found. I like it because the hammer was old-timey. I didn't even paint it when it was done, I just slapped it in a box frame without a title. It looked like this (except it was a hammer):

img690.imageshack.us

At the end of the year the art department hosted student art auctions to raise money, so I entered the hammer. It sold for $15,000 (the school got the money, not me), which was the highest amount anything sold for that year. The buyer wanted me to sign the back of it, so I did, and I explained to him that I didn't have any idea what the fark I was doing. He told me I should make more. So that summer I made a wrench, some old ice tongs, and a log splitting wedge. The wrench sold for $45 at a local gallery and they wouldn't take the wedge or the ice tongs.

Makes no sense. But lesson learned: if you're going to sell your first piece of art, make sure the proceeds go to YOU and not someone else. You probably won't get another chance.
 
2012-04-18 04:06:16 PM
i1136.photobucket.com
 
2012-04-18 04:17:19 PM
In before Pisschrist.
 
2012-04-18 04:58:20 PM
i568.photobucket.com
 
2012-04-18 05:03:37 PM
MisterLoki

crushed pope.jpg

That is terrible! If the meteor came through the window in the front as they seem to be representing with the glass...then he would have fallen backwards and the rock would be on his stomach. If the meteor came from the side as they seem to be representing with the meteor...then glass would be scattered around the pope and he would be laying in it. Terrible.

The devil is in the details.
 
2012-04-18 06:05:26 PM

Lsherm: The art world makes no sense to me. My senior year of mechanical engineering we did an independent study class with the art department, primarily to teach the art students how to weld, build things that wouldn't fall over, shiat like that. In return, we had to make "art" with the help of the art students. I made a few things, but the first thing, the very first thing I made was a paper mache` mold of a hammer I found. I like it because the hammer was old-timey. I didn't even paint it when it was done, I just slapped it in a box frame without a title. It looked like this (except it was a hammer):

[img690.imageshack.us image 506x400]

At the end of the year the art department hosted student art auctions to raise money, so I entered the hammer. It sold for $15,000 (the school got the money, not me), which was the highest amount anything sold for that year. The buyer wanted me to sign the back of it, so I did, and I explained to him that I didn't have any idea what the fark I was doing. He told me I should make more. So that summer I made a wrench, some old ice tongs, and a log splitting wedge. The wrench sold for $45 at a local gallery and they wouldn't take the wedge or the ice tongs.

Makes no sense. But lesson learned: if you're going to sell your first piece of art, make sure the proceeds go to YOU and not someone else. You probably won't get another chance.


That is pretty cool dude, and what a lesson to learn.
 
2012-04-18 06:08:00 PM
stwaz.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-04-18 06:16:37 PM
Art article - one pic? Hmm.
 
2012-04-18 06:40:29 PM

Lsherm: The art world makes no sense to me. My senior year of mechanical engineering we did an independent study class with the art department, primarily to teach the art students how to weld, build things that wouldn't fall over, shiat like that. In return, we had to make "art" with the help of the art students. I made a few things, but the first thing, the very first thing I made was a paper mache` mold of a hammer I found. I like it because the hammer was old-timey. I didn't even paint it when it was done, I just slapped it in a box frame without a title. It looked like this (except it was a hammer):



At the end of the year the art department hosted student art auctions to raise money, so I entered the hammer. It sold for $15,000 (the school got the money, not me), which was the highest amount anything sold for that year. The buyer wanted me to sign the back of it, so I did, and I explained to him that I didn't have any idea what the fark I was doing. He told me I should make more. So that summer I made a wrench, some old ice tongs, and a log splitting wedge. The wrench sold for $45 at a local gallery and they wouldn't take the wedge or the ice tongs.

Makes no sense. But lesson learned: if you're going to sell your first piece of art, make sure the proceeds go to YOU and not someone else. You probably won't get another chance.


How was the $15k price arrived at? Did the school put that price on it, or was there an auction or something?
 
2012-04-18 06:47:38 PM
This headline reads like a summary of the next Dan Brown novel.
 
2012-04-18 06:49:09 PM

JohnAnnArbor: Lsherm: The art world makes no sense to me. My senior year of mechanical engineering we did an independent study class with the art department, primarily to teach the art students how to weld, build things that wouldn't fall over, shiat like that. In return, we had to make "art" with the help of the art students. I made a few things, but the first thing, the very first thing I made was a paper mache` mold of a hammer I found. I like it because the hammer was old-timey. I didn't even paint it when it was done, I just slapped it in a box frame without a title. It looked like this (except it was a hammer):



At the end of the year the art department hosted student art auctions to raise money, so I entered the hammer. It sold for $15,000 (the school got the money, not me), which was the highest amount anything sold for that year. The buyer wanted me to sign the back of it, so I did, and I explained to him that I didn't have any idea what the fark I was doing. He told me I should make more. So that summer I made a wrench, some old ice tongs, and a log splitting wedge. The wrench sold for $45 at a local gallery and they wouldn't take the wedge or the ice tongs.

Makes no sense. But lesson learned: if you're going to sell your first piece of art, make sure the proceeds go to YOU and not someone else. You probably won't get another chance.

How was the $15k price arrived at? Did the school put that price on it, or was there an auction or something?


You might read the post you quoted (hint... it was an auction)
 
2012-04-18 07:18:15 PM

Lsherm: The art world makes no sense to me. My senior year of mechanical engineering we did an independent study class with the art department, primarily to teach the art students how to weld, build things that wouldn't fall over, shiat like that. In return, we had to make "art" with the help of the art students. I made a few things, but the first thing, the very first thing I made was a paper mache` mold of a hammer I found. I like it because the hammer was old-timey. I didn't even paint it when it was done, I just slapped it in a box frame without a title. It looked like this (except it was a hammer):

[img690.imageshack.us image 506x400]

At the end of the year the art department hosted student art auctions to raise money, so I entered the hammer. It sold for $15,000 (the school got the money, not me), which was the highest amount anything sold for that year. The buyer wanted me to sign the back of it, so I did, and I explained to him that I didn't have any idea what the fark I was doing. He told me I should make more. So that summer I made a wrench, some old ice tongs, and a log splitting wedge. The wrench sold for $45 at a local gallery and they wouldn't take the wedge or the ice tongs.

Makes no sense. But lesson learned: if you're going to sell your first piece of art, make sure the proceeds go to YOU and not someone else. You probably won't get another chance.


CSB

To be fair, it was a fundraiser. But yeah, I've been to those and was flabbergasted when some dipshiats paid $3000 for some goon to sing songs and tell stories to their children. Really it was just them giving $3000 to the museum.
 
2012-04-18 09:12:52 PM

Ed Willy: JohnAnnArbor: Lsherm: The art world makes no sense to me. My senior year of mechanical engineering we did an independent study class with the art department, primarily to teach the art students how to weld, build things that wouldn't fall over, shiat like that. In return, we had to make "art" with the help of the art students. I made a few things, but the first thing, the very first thing I made was a paper mache` mold of a hammer I found. I like it because the hammer was old-timey. I didn't even paint it when it was done, I just slapped it in a box frame without a title. It looked like this (except it was a hammer):



At the end of the year the art department hosted student art auctions to raise money, so I entered the hammer. It sold for $15,000 (the school got the money, not me), which was the highest amount anything sold for that year. The buyer wanted me to sign the back of it, so I did, and I explained to him that I didn't have any idea what the fark I was doing. He told me I should make more. So that summer I made a wrench, some old ice tongs, and a log splitting wedge. The wrench sold for $45 at a local gallery and they wouldn't take the wedge or the ice tongs.

Makes no sense. But lesson learned: if you're going to sell your first piece of art, make sure the proceeds go to YOU and not someone else. You probably won't get another chance.

How was the $15k price arrived at? Did the school put that price on it, or was there an auction or something?

You might read the post you quoted (hint... it was an auction)


Why, yes. It did say that. Oops.
 
2012-04-18 09:26:13 PM
It should be pointed out that Damien Hirst hasn't actually managed to sell his fifty million Pound "crystal skull", and there's a rumor that he hard to borrow the money to have the thing made.
 
2012-04-18 09:27:34 PM

Lsherm: I made a few things, but the first thing, the very first thing I made was a paper mache` mold of a hammer I found. I like it because the hammer was old-timey. I didn't even paint it when it was done, I just slapped it in a box frame without a title. He told me I should make more. So that summer I made a wrench, some old ice tongs, and a log splitting wedge. The wrench sold for $45 at a local gallery and they wouldn't take the wedge or the ice tongs.


So why didn't you make another hammer like the guy suggested? I understand the charitable bidding that happened at that auction. Wouldn't expect 15 large in a retail setting. Still, seems like if you have the hammer used for the first one you'd make more of those and not pieces using other tools. The hammer is the one that sold really well.
 
2012-04-18 09:39:34 PM
Wow, 2271 words about art that the writer doesn't really like... or feel like sharing. I guess we should just take their wordiness for it.

csb
At one point I made a soapstone sculpture of Jormungandr for art class. I thought it was pretty good. The art teacher was showing off student artwork to some sort of visiting dignitary. She says "he's doing a sculpture of a snake eating it's tale (sic)... like they really do that." The visiting dignitary knew what Jormungandr was though and thought it was pretty cool.

/I have no proof she spelled the words wrong in her speech bubbles, but she *was* an art teacher
 
2012-04-18 10:11:26 PM
I'm paper macheing a hammer so I'm getting ...
 
2012-04-18 11:33:34 PM
Allow me to take a moment and explain how art works:

Artist creates two pieces of art. Dealer sells one to Patron A and one to Patron B. Dealer arranges for the pieces to be put up for auction. Patron A buys Patron B's piece for, say, $500,000 and vice versa. Dealer arranges for both pieces to be donated to a museum and both patrons can claim $500,000 charitable donations on their taxes for a real cost of $6,000. Artist makes makes $4,800 (after commission) and must pay taxes, insurance, etc. from that amount. Post modernists who argue against artistic quality act in service of these people by undermining the ability of art experts to testify as to the actual worth of these artworks in the event of a court case brought by the IRS.

There are legitimately talented and professional artists in the world, but their success has little to do with their artistic ability and everything to do with rich people being able to game the tax/financial system by "overvaluing" that which is ultimately worthless.
 
2012-04-19 12:04:47 AM

busy chillin': MisterLoki

crushed pope.jpg

That is terrible! If the meteor came through the window in the front as they seem to be representing with the glass...then he would have fallen backwards and the rock would be on his stomach. If the meteor came from the side as they seem to be representing with the meteor...then glass would be scattered around the pope and he would be laying in it. Terrible.

The devil is in the details.


It's a conspiracy. There was a second meteor.
 
2012-04-19 07:39:41 AM
26.media.tumblr.com

/hot art
 
2012-04-20 12:07:19 PM

SkittleBrau: Lsherm: I made a few things, but the first thing, the very first thing I made was a paper mache` mold of a hammer I found. I like it because the hammer was old-timey. I didn't even paint it when it was done, I just slapped it in a box frame without a title. He told me I should make more. So that summer I made a wrench, some old ice tongs, and a log splitting wedge. The wrench sold for $45 at a local gallery and they wouldn't take the wedge or the ice tongs.

So why didn't you make another hammer like the guy suggested? I understand the charitable bidding that happened at that auction. Wouldn't expect 15 large in a retail setting. Still, seems like if you have the hammer used for the first one you'd make more of those and not pieces using other tools. The hammer is the one that sold really well.


Hah! Wasn't my hammer.

But I'll be honest with you, duplicating the same thing would feel a little like cheating. But I'd do it in a heartbeat if I thought I could sell multiple copies for a few grand each.

/off to find another hammer.
 
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