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(MSNBC)   Affirmative ghostrider, you may buzz the tower   (msnbc.msn.com) divider line 118
    More: Cool, Space Museum, Dulles International Airport, NASA TV, National Airport, BYOB, visitor center, a.m. ET, Pranknet  
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18225 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Apr 2012 at 8:46 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-04-17 08:44:49 AM  
yippeee!
static.oprah.com

damn, that maverick!!!
modernsophist.com
 
2012-04-17 08:47:30 AM  
Oh please crash.
 
2012-04-17 08:49:20 AM  
Neat.

Remember when America could send people into space? Good times.
 
2012-04-17 08:50:50 AM  
i44.tinypic.com
 
2012-04-17 08:51:57 AM  
The carrier aircraft with Discovery was then scheduled to touch down at Washington Dulles International Airport ...

cdn.overclock.net
"Yo dawg, what if we put a carrier aircraft on an aircraft carrier?"
 
2012-04-17 08:54:45 AM  

GORDON: Remember when America could send people into space? Good times.


I watched the ISS go by at sunset last week and this is all that crossed my mind. We have no way to get to that thing without being stowaways.
 
2012-04-17 08:55:01 AM  
So the Atlantis is at Cape Canaveral, and now the Discovery is going to be at the Smithsonian.

That's only two shuttles on display...where are the others?? I thought they were all supposed to be retired. Why isn't the government putting the other ones out on display? Do they have something to hide?
 
2012-04-17 08:55:54 AM  
I thought it was just strong gender dimorphism, but I think the inevitable conclusion is that they are going extinct because they can't find members of their own species to mate with.
It's so sad.
 
2012-04-17 08:57:05 AM  

MythDragon: So the Atlantis is at Cape Canaveral, and now the Discovery is going to be at the Smithsonian.

That's only two shuttles on display...where are the others?? I thought they were all supposed to be retired. Why isn't the government putting the other ones out on display? Do they have something to hide?


4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-04-17 08:57:11 AM  
end of an era. sad.
 
2012-04-17 08:59:06 AM  
How hard would it be to fly an airplane with a shuttle attached to the top?

/serious question
 
2012-04-17 08:59:16 AM  

funk_soul_bubby: GORDON: Remember when America could send people into space? Good times.

I watched the ISS go by at sunset last week and this is all that crossed my mind. We have no way to get to that thing without being stowaways.


SpaceX may launch their first unmanned flight to ISS this month, and their capsule is designed to support future manned flight.
 
2012-04-17 08:59:19 AM  

funk_soul_bubby: We have no way to get to that thing...


Oh, we can get that thing if we really want to:
upload.wikimedia.org
AG-135 ASAT missle (new window)
 
2012-04-17 09:03:22 AM  
FTA: "The carrier aircraft with Discovery was then scheduled to touch down at Washington Dulles International Airport at around 10:40 a.m. ET, coming to a stop on the runway just before 11 a.m."

So after nosewheel touchdown, it's going to take ~20 minutes to reverse-thrust and roll to a stop???

Journalists are such morans about every subject in the world aviation.

/pilot
//not type-rated for 747
///or any twin or jet for that matter :-(
 
2012-04-17 09:04:12 AM  

gretzkyscores: FTA: "The carrier aircraft with Discovery was then scheduled to touch down at Washington Dulles International Airport at around 10:40 a.m. ET, coming to a stop on the runway just before 11 a.m."

So after nosewheel touchdown, it's going to take ~20 minutes to reverse-thrust and roll to a stop???

Journalists are such morans about every subject in the world aviation.

/pilot
//not type-rated for 747
///or any twin or jet for that matter :-(


You sound like a terrorist.
 
2012-04-17 09:05:41 AM  

MythDragon: So the Atlantis is at Cape Canaveral, and now the Discovery is going to be at the Smithsonian.

That's only two shuttles on display...where are the others?? I thought they were all supposed to be retired. Why isn't the government putting the other ones out on display? Do they have something to hide?


Endeavour is going to LA, Enterprise (the test shuttle) is going to New York, Columbia is spending it's time spread throughout Texas and the Gulf Coast and Challenger is on a Caribbean Vacation.
 
2012-04-17 09:07:13 AM  
I work at ksc, and was out on the slf to watch the flight. It was awesome. The announcer sucked...

She called it endeavour, and then endeavoury. Keep up the good work.
 
2012-04-17 09:08:06 AM  
I can see it from my house! (actually, just down the street). I"m leaving work in about an hour to see it fly in to Dulles.
 
Biv
2012-04-17 09:10:09 AM  

GORDON: Neat.

Remember when America could send people into space? Good times.


It's just farking sad and disgraceful. It's 2012 and we now have less manned space capability than 1972.
 
2012-04-17 09:10:51 AM  

Nem Wan: funk_soul_bubby: GORDON: Remember when America could send people into space? Good times.

I watched the ISS go by at sunset last week and this is all that crossed my mind. We have no way to get to that thing without being stowaways.

SpaceX may launch their first unmanned flight to ISS this month, and their capsule is designed to support future manned flight.


Good looking out, I hadn't been keeping up as much lately.

Link (new window)
 
2012-04-17 09:15:14 AM  

gretzkyscores: So after nosewheel touchdown, it's going to take ~20 minutes to reverse-thrust and roll to a stop???


I just assumed they had extended the main runway at Dulles to about 75,000 ft. Then you don't need any stinking reverse thrust, thought it does take 20 minutes to get a GPS lock and figure out which exit to take to get back to the terminal.
 
2012-04-17 09:16:24 AM  

MythDragon: So the Atlantis is at Cape Canaveral, and now the Discovery is going to be at the Smithsonian.

That's only two shuttles on display...where are the others?? I thought they were all supposed to be retired. Why isn't the government putting the other ones out on display? Do they have something to hide?


Discovery replaces Enterprise. Enterprise will be flown next week to New York City and delivered by barge to the Intrepid Air and Space Museum. Later this year Endeavour will be flown to Los Angeles and towed through the streets to the California Science Center. Challenger debris is collected in two Minuteman missile silos at Complex 31 on the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Columbia debris is collected on the 16th floor of the Vehicle Assembly Building at the Kennedy Space Center. "Pathfinder" is a steel and wood mockup that was used for fit-checks and was later dressed up to look like a real orbiter and is the only display of a full shuttle stack with external tank and boosters, at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama. There are also interesting artifacts like OV-095 at the Johnson Space Center, which is/was a complete, functional duplicate of an orbiter's avionics and electronics without the vehicle, like a disembodied nervous system. Not really a simulator because it's as real as what's in the orbiters. Not sure what's happening to that or the big shuttle simulators at JSC.
 
2012-04-17 09:17:49 AM  
If you ripped off the wings and put a diesel engine in the loading bay, the shuttle would make a handsome train.
 
2012-04-17 09:20:26 AM  

Nem Wan: Not sure what's happening to that or the big shuttle simulators at JSC.


Museum of Flight, Seattle.
 
2012-04-17 09:21:33 AM  

GORDON: Remember when America could send people into space? Good times.


www.thedailybeast.com

I'm working on it.
 
2012-04-17 09:22:31 AM  

Nem Wan: funk_soul_bubby: GORDON: Remember when America could send people into space? Good times.

I watched the ISS go by at sunset last week and this is all that crossed my mind. We have no way to get to that thing without being stowaways.

SpaceX may launch their first unmanned flight to ISS this month, and their capsule is designed to support future manned flight.


Came here to say something like this. There will be an American manned-launch capability ready very soon----and I am sure that if it really became an urgent issue, they could be ready in a matter of months. From what I understand, they have the capability and just want to ensure that it is all safe and tested.
 
2012-04-17 09:22:51 AM  
I'm currently sitting on a Jeep rollbar in the Udvar-Hazy parking lot, so I'm getting a kick out of these replies....
 
2012-04-17 09:26:20 AM  

Biv: GORDON: Neat.

Remember when America could send people into space? Good times.

It's just farking sad and disgraceful. It's 2012 and we now have less manned space capability than 1972.


Its just because manned spaceflight is expensive and unnecessary. Contrary to popular belief, NASA has been making great strides in exploration of the universe... we're just using more advanced drones now instead of people.

Hell, some time really soon our new Mars probe should be landing... its a nuclear powered SUV capable of operating for a year without sunlight, and can detect water up to 40m (i think) under the ground using tech donated to us by the russians. Pretty awesome shiat, from a science stand point.
 
2012-04-17 09:27:35 AM  
If you live in the DC area, NASA.gov has a list of good vantage points to spot the plane from as it flies by.
 
2012-04-17 09:27:51 AM  
I'm heading up to the roof of my office building in about 15 mins to watch the DC flyby. I can't wait!
 
2012-04-17 09:28:18 AM  
msnbcmedia2.msn.com

It seems like they could have at least washed it first. That NASA sure hires some lazy bastards.
 
BC
2012-04-17 09:34:53 AM  

Alonjar:
Its just because manned spaceflight is expensive and unnecessary. Contrary to popular belief, NASA has been making great strides in exploration of the universe... we're just using more advanced drones now instead of people.

Hell, some time really soon our new Mars probe should be landing... its a nuclear powered SUV capable of operating for a year without sunlight, and can detect water up to 40m (i think) under the ground using tech donated to us by the russians. Pretty awesome shiat, from a science stand point.


You make valid points, I think...and you are absolutely right, imo...the amount of science being done, and the technology doing it, is truly awesome.

Yet, I can not find myself agreeing with your initial premise...that manned flight is unnecessary.

All the robots in the world, all the technology we've ever invented or may invent, all the "nuclear powered SUVs" we may send to our own solar system or beyond, can not replace the only true EXPLORER on Earth...

A human being muttering "What's that?" as he pokes something with a stick.

The scientific process of collecting, analyzing, and testing things can be done by any sufficiently equipped and suitably programmed mechanical device.

Exploration requires a mind.
 
2012-04-17 09:35:13 AM  
This is what's wrong with the world...

We farking HAD space ships. Sure, they were cumbersome and only good for low orbit, but now we're reverting back to Apollo era capsules.

Insert rambling rant about budget allocations, ineptitude of government, relative cost of war and a moon colony, etc.

At this point we might as well mine low earth orbit with debris. It's not being used for anything worthwhile.
 
2012-04-17 09:36:20 AM  

GORDON: Neat.

Remember when America could send people into space? Good times.


Gas is really expensive? High unemployment? Pulling out of an expensive and pointless war? Don't have any way to launch humans into space?

Holy shiat, it's the 1970's all over again!
 
2012-04-17 09:42:41 AM  

dittybopper: GORDON: Neat.

Remember when America could send people into space? Good times.

Gas is really expensive? High unemployment? Pulling out of an expensive and pointless war? Don't have any way to launch humans into space?

Holy shiat, it's the 1970's all over again!


Quaaludes are coming back!
 
Biv
2012-04-17 09:43:37 AM  

Alonjar: Biv: GORDON: Neat.

Remember when America could send people into space? Good times.

It's just farking sad and disgraceful. It's 2012 and we now have less manned space capability than 1972.

Its just because manned spaceflight is expensive and unnecessary. Contrary to popular belief, NASA has been making great strides in exploration of the universe... we're just using more advanced drones now instead of people.


No, we are collecting data. Exploration requires people. We should have had a farking base on the moon at this point, let alone be making trips to Mars. We went to the moon in a bucket wired to a calculator. This shiat is unacceptable.

Nothing pushes technology forward faster than finding ways for our fragile bodies to survive in extreme environments, whether it be in space, underwater, in the arctic or at war. We are wasting opportunities. And for any country on this planet to have more manned space capabilities than us is disgraceful.

Build a new farking spacecraft. One owned by the people, not a private company.
 
2012-04-17 09:45:04 AM  
From the 10th floor of my office building here in Fairfax, VA you can see Dulles Airport and see planes circling and landing all day. I guess I should remember to go up there around 10:30. Of course it would be cloudy today when it hasn't rained all month and has been sunny every day.
 
das
2012-04-17 09:46:21 AM  

Rapmaster2000: dittybopper: GORDON: Neat.

Remember when America could send people into space? Good times.

Gas is really expensive? High unemployment? Pulling out of an expensive and pointless war? Don't have any way to launch humans into space?

Holy shiat, it's the 1970's all over again!

Quaaludes are coming back!


Zombie Reagan 2012!!!!!!
 
2012-04-17 09:49:23 AM  

girljen: How hard would it be to fly an airplane with a shuttle attached to the top?

/serious question


Ever try to go to the hardware store with a wife in tow?
 
2012-04-17 09:49:34 AM  

girljen: How hard would it be to fly an airplane with a shuttle attached to the top?

/serious question


I'm sure its a little tricky, but probably not as hard as you would think. Takeoff/Landing would easily be the hardest part. Once you get away from the ground, its probably perfectly normal.
 
2012-04-17 09:50:18 AM  

PYROY: It seems like they could have at least washed it first. That NASA sure hires some lazy bastards.


I was in Charlotte this weekend and stopped in at the aviation museum there. They've got this busted ass A320 there that they didn't even clean the mud off before putting it on display.

www.jaunted.com
 
2012-04-17 09:50:37 AM  
The only fitting final resting place for the space shuttle is sitting up on blocks in the front yard of a trailer in Alabama, right next to the old washing machine and refrigerator and just in front of the dog pen.
 
2012-04-17 09:54:02 AM  

itsfullofstars: PYROY: It seems like they could have at least washed it first. That NASA sure hires some lazy bastards.

I was in Charlotte this weekend and stopped in at the aviation museum there. They've got this busted ass A320 there that they didn't even clean the mud off before putting it on display.

[www.jaunted.com image 610x344]


Do they also have a beverage cart retrospective and a collection of barf bags? Because that's about as exciting as an A320.
 
2012-04-17 09:54:38 AM  

das: Rapmaster2000: dittybopper: GORDON: Neat.

Remember when America could send people into space? Good times.

Gas is really expensive? High unemployment? Pulling out of an expensive and pointless war? Don't have any way to launch humans into space?

Holy shiat, it's the 1970's all over again!

Quaaludes are coming back!

Zombie Reagan 2012!!!!!!


They should bring back Quark.
 
2012-04-17 09:55:21 AM  

girljen: How hard would it be to fly an airplane with a shuttle attached to the top?

/serious question


They've been doing it successfully for decades now without incident, so I guess not very?

If you're asking instead if a shuttle can be launched from an airplane instead of from the ground, the short answer is yes, the concept's been demonstrated, and the longer answer is, we don't know how to make it practical yet.
 
2012-04-17 09:57:27 AM  

Rapmaster2000: itsfullofstars: PYROY: It seems like they could have at least washed it first. That NASA sure hires some lazy bastards.

I was in Charlotte this weekend and stopped in at the aviation museum there. They've got this busted ass A320 there that they didn't even clean the mud off before putting it on display.

[www.jaunted.com image 610x344]

Do they also have a beverage cart retrospective and a collection of barf bags? Because that's about as exciting as an A320.


Ummm, you know that particular A320 has an interesting history, right?
 
2012-04-17 09:57:49 AM  

mortimer_ford: If you ripped off the wings and put a diesel engine in the loading bay, the shuttle would make a handsome train.


upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-04-17 09:58:22 AM  

wildcardjack: but now we're reverting back to Apollo era capsules.


errr...there is a reason for that...they are the best design for getting in and out of Earths gravity hole.
 
2012-04-17 10:01:33 AM  
Biv:No, we are collecting data. Exploration requires people. We should have had a farking base on the moon at this point, let alone be making trips to Mars. We went to the moon in a bucket wired to a calculator. This shiat is unacceptable.

Nothing pushes technology forward faster than finding ways for our fragile bodies to survive in extreme environments, whether it be in space, underwater, in the arctic or at war. We are wasting opportunities. And for any country on this planet to have more manned space capabilities than us is disgraceful.

Build a new farking spacecraft. One owned by the people, not a private company.


I agree. I fully support robotic exploration of our solar system and our galaxy. However, there is nothing quite like manned exploration for discovery and for inspiring people here on earth.

Sadly, NASA's budget is less than .5% of the federal budget these days - the lowest it's been since 1959. In the days of the space race, the allocation peaked at 4.41%. Imagine what could be done with that sort of investment today. If we want it, we need to pay for it. Personally, I'm all for that.
 
2012-04-17 10:02:52 AM  

JackieRabbit: The only fitting final resting place for the space shuttle is sitting up on blocks in the front yard of a trailer in Alabama, right next to the old washing machine and refrigerator and just in front of the dog pen.


They've got one in Alabama, the Pathfinder, but it's partially made of wood. Not the best material for re-entry. Here's a pic of it I took last month.
img.photobucket.com
 
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