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(Huffington Post)   How German electro-pop pioneers Kraftwerk predicted the future of the world's technology   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 97
    More: Interesting, Kraftwerk  
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4966 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 17 Apr 2012 at 12:10 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-04-17 11:13:29 AM
No love for Silver Apples?
 
2012-04-17 11:17:47 AM

creepy jackalope eye: No love for Silver Apples?


LewDux: www.shanghai247.net

 
2012-04-17 11:27:57 AM
Kraut Rock Sampler by Julian Cope - good read

The man machine is forever ruined by me because whenever I hear it all I hear is Dick Allmighty by 2 Live Crew
 
2012-04-17 11:33:53 AM

barefoot in the head: The first radio song I recall having a true electronic feel was "Telstar" by the Tornados (new window)


True Fact: that was the #1 song in the USA on the day I was born. Great song, too.
 
2012-04-17 11:37:45 AM

Ishkur: NO NO NO, article writer. Kraftwerk did not invent anything! Stop pressing this notion.

There was a HUGE electronic music scene in the 70s of which Kraftwerk were simply an important part. Kraftwerk did do one thing special, which I'll get to in a sec, but to say that they alone were responsible for the triumph of electronic music is doing a serious disservice to the legions of other experimental composers in the 70s like Bruce Haak, Tangerine Dream, Neu!, Can, Vangelis, Giorgio Moroder, Jean Michel Jarre, Brian Eno, Wendy Carlos, Morton Subotnik, Edgar Varese, Karlheinz Stockhausen, John Cage, Terry Reilley, Steve Roach or Robert farking Moog.

BUT....

All of them seem to use electronic instruments as a way to experiment with new sounds and textures, to enhance their existing repertoire, and none of them paid too much attention to rhythm and percussion.

That is the one thing Kraftwerk did better than all the electronic pioneers of the time: Percussion. They were impeccable percussionists. They built their own electronic drumkits a decade before the first drum machines would hit the market. Their attention to detail was expertly employed in the rhythm and grooves of their drum tracks.

Kraftwerk were trying to capture the machine sounds of every day urban industrial living. Automotive factories, factory presses, washers and dryers, and the unrelenting grinding yawn of a futuristic society increasingly dominated by technology. The fact that they always passed themselves off as unemotional robots in their live shows was part of that.

It is for this reason that their music stands out: Their plinky-plonky brand of technopop, which made kitschy little rhythms, made fans out of middle class Detroit black youth. Kraftwerk tracks were excellent for sampling and it's their influence that gave rise to electro, techno, hip hop and modern electronic dance music as we know it.


Just for the record..

Hütter and Schneider hold a patent for an electronic drum kit with sensor pads, filed in July 1975 and issued in June 1977. It has to be hit with metal sticks which are connected to the device to complete a circuit that triggers analog synthetic percussion sounds. The band used this electronic drum kit on the album Autobahn, the following tour and it was featured on the BBC television series Tomorrow's World in 1975. On the Radio-Activity tour in 1976 Kraftwerk tested out an experimental light-beam-activated drum cage allowing Flür to trigger electronic percussion through arm and hand movements.
 
2012-04-17 11:48:20 AM
At the beginning of your rant:

Ishkur: NO NO NO, article writer. Kraftwerk did not invent anything! Stop pressing this notion.

At the end of your rant:

Kraftwerk tracks were excellent for sampling and it's their influence that gave rise to electro, techno, hip hop and modern electronic dance music as we know it.

So which is it? You went full circle just to contradict your original point.
 
2012-04-17 11:59:36 AM
Pocket Calculator brings a smile to my face every time I hear it.
 
2012-04-17 12:02:27 PM
Delia Derbyshire at the BBC's radiophonic workshop did some deeply weird and pioneering electronic music in the early 60s, including the Doctor Who soundtrack. She remixed it from a conventional score into something truly mind- farking and disturbing. Ron Grainer, the composer, was so impressed he wanted to give her a co- writing credit but the suits said no.
 
2012-04-17 12:08:49 PM
I drove the neighbor lady crazy in 1975 with Kraftwerk and a generous helping of ELP.

In those days the tv cable also carried fm radio and I tapped the drop and ran a cable through my bedroom window for the stereo.

Her house was only 10 feet from my window.

She called the Sheriff on me. Told him I had some kind of wire run out the window that was stealing her thoughts and playing them back too loud on my stereo.

She ended up in the nut house.
 
2012-04-17 12:25:14 PM

Mr_Fabulous: barefoot in the head: The first radio song I recall having a true electronic feel was "Telstar" by the Tornados (new window)

True Fact: that was the #1 song in the USA on the day I was born.

launched ;)
Great song, too.

Sure was. It expressed where the 60s mind was headed in a very idealistic and encouraging way.
 
2012-04-17 12:42:43 PM
Krapwerk. terrible, terrible, souless music. The electronic equivalent to cats howling and scratching chalkboards at the same time.
 
2012-04-17 01:12:31 PM
Hier spricht die Stimme der Energie
ich bin ein riesiger elektrischer Generator
ich liefere ihnen Licht und Kraft
und ermogliche es Ihnen Sprache, Musik und Bild
durch den Ather auszusenden und zu empfangen
ich bin Ihr Diener und Ihr Herr zugleich
deshalb hutet mich gut
mich, den Genius der Energie
 
2012-04-17 01:18:52 PM
Saw them in 1975. About 200 people showed up in an arena that held 10,000. was strange indeed.
No one clapped or cheered.

//Freakin old....
 
2012-04-17 02:26:39 PM
Kraftwerk-influenced music is referred to in Germany as 'kling-klang musik'.

I particularly enjoy the Kraftwerk album 'Computer World', and the song 'Home Computer'

Now I have my own computer
beam myself into the future


//'The Mix' is good too, dammit
 
2012-04-17 02:30:28 PM

radiovox: At the beginning of your rant:

Ishkur: NO NO NO, article writer. Kraftwerk did not invent anything! Stop pressing this notion.

At the end of your rant:

Kraftwerk tracks were excellent for sampling and it's their influence that gave rise to electro, techno, hip hop and modern electronic dance music as we know it.

So which is it? You went full circle just to contradict your original point.

 
2012-04-17 04:11:11 PM

CharlieBrown: Krapwerk. terrible, terrible, souless music. The electronic equivalent to cats howling and scratching chalkboards at the same time.


I came here, but was afraid to say this, so I'm getting a big kick out of your reply.

I had enjoyed early to mid era Devo before I'd heard of Kraftwerk and was sure I'd love them too, but no. While they both have at least some electronica and weirdness going for them, Kraftwerk leaves me cold. I suspect Kraptwerk *did* influence a lot of music. That might explain the mindless syn-drum beats of the pop-Krap churned out in the '80s. For that alone, they should excommunicated from the planet.
 
2012-04-17 04:19:00 PM

radiovox: So which is it?


They were not the inventors, they were the exploiters of the invention.

If people sampled the living shiat out of Yellow Magic Orchestra instead, we would be getting myopic Huffingon Post articles about that quirky J-group (and just to be clear, it's not like nobody did. Just not as much as Kraftwerk).

After all, both YMO and Kraftwerk came from cultures that had to be rebooted after 1945, so both cultures tended to look forward to the future rather than to the past. And both made excellent, groovecentric, addictive electronic rhythms.

Why one is deified when the other is not when both made relatively influential music is just one of those random happenstances of life. It's not like The Electrifying Mojo didn't cane them both to death on his radio show in Detroit, influencing a generation of genre-bending new musicians.
 
2012-04-17 04:31:21 PM

Ishkur: Why one is deified when the other is not when both made relatively influential music is just one of those random happenstances of life. It's not like The Electrifying Mojo didn't cane them both to death on his radio show in Detroit, influencing a generation of genre-bending new musicians.


Agreed. Like I mentioned at the beginning of the thread - it's like Kraftwerk had better PR.

I've found a lot of drummers, IMHO, have trouble with melody. It's a shame that Kraftwerk was seen as 'the definition' and not just yet another experimental electronic band. Never forget how incredible it was finding YMO, and going 'Oh my God - how much of this has been ripped off', and then finding later stuff (After Yello, Laurie Anderson, Jarre, Vangelis, hell, even the synth work in Electric Light Orchestra) like Koto's 12" Mixes in 1995.

There's been leagues of awesome. And there's tons of new awesome and pioneering stuff out there - just check out Siriusmo's track "Wow" - but be sure to find the version remixed by Modeselektor.

Which is here: http://youtu.be/7dyqMB5IMHs

Speaking of Modeselektor, here's Siriusmo returning the favor with "Deboutonner": http://youtu.be/XxlC_Bc6LRQ

The cool is there, but man you have to dig.
 
2012-04-17 05:01:29 PM

Ishkur: Automotive factories, factory presses, washers and dryers, and the unrelenting grinding yawn of a futuristic society increasingly dominated by technology. The fact that they always passed themselves off as unemotional robots in their live shows was part of that.

It is for this reason that their music stands out: Their plinky-plonky brand of technopop, which made kitschy little rhythms, made fans out of middle class Detroit black youth.


Read that, thought "damn, even Ishkur could get behind that analysis" then saw who posted it.


RIGHT.

/carry on, then.
//Wir fahr'n fahr'n fahr'n auf der Autobahn...
 
2012-04-17 05:18:22 PM
No mention of this guy?

i2.listal.com

No matter what you think of ELP's music, this guy was a synthesizer pioneer. He was touring with a smaller version of that modular Moog in 1970 AND he kept it in tune (mostly) and was getting sounds out of it live that I've never heard before or since. He was also instrumental in developing polyphonic synthesizers as Bob Moog used him as a guinea pig. He toured with this:

www.brain-salad-surgery.de

It's a polyphonic synth (the Apollo, on the bottom) which became the Memorymoog and a monophonic synth with touch sensitive keyboard called the Lyra; KE was touring with this setup in 1973/74 when most people couldn't even tune a Minimoog.

I love Kraftwerk from Autobahn on but damn are they overrated when it comes to innovations with synthesizers.
 
2012-04-17 05:30:40 PM

Henry Holland: No mention of this guy?

[i2.listal.com image 547x481]

No matter what you think of ELP's music, this guy was a synthesizer pioneer. He was touring with a smaller version of that modular Moog in 1970 AND he kept it in tune (mostly) and was getting sounds out of it live that I've never heard before or since. He was also instrumental in developing polyphonic synthesizers as Bob Moog used him as a guinea pig. He toured with this:

[www.brain-salad-surgery.de image 480x332]

It's a polyphonic synth (the Apollo, on the bottom) which became the Memorymoog and a monophonic synth with touch sensitive keyboard called the Lyra; KE was touring with this setup in 1973/74 when most people couldn't even tune a Minimoog.

I love Kraftwerk from Autobahn on but damn are they overrated when it comes to innovations with synthesizers.


Link (new window)
 
2012-04-17 06:45:12 PM

Henry Holland: No mention of this guy?


Yes, but most people want their electronic music to be interesting and coherent, not just self-indulgent, masterbatory, noodly wankery.
 
2012-04-17 06:46:50 PM

ArkAngel: Approves


Oh, and fun fact: The music playing in that Simpsons scene is not Kraftwerk.

It's Keoki - Caterpillar.

An unusual track selection for entirely different reasons; it fits just the same.
 
2012-04-17 06:51:47 PM
...something new (new window)
 
2012-04-17 07:06:35 PM
Among her other accomplishments, Annette Peacock is an unsung pioneer of electronic music. Years before the commercial emergence of synthesizers, she received a prototype from inventor Robert Moog. This prompted her to synthesize her own voice, which according to most reports had never been done before. Ultimately these experiments brought about an innovative 1971 album, The Bley/Peacock^ Synthesizer Show^
/Link (new window)
 
2012-04-17 07:07:09 PM
Nice synth work in this vid (new window)... Peter Murphy is even sporting a Kaoss pad

Love merging the synthetic with the organic
 
2012-04-17 07:27:58 PM
 
2012-04-17 07:28:05 PM
Where's the love for PIERRE HENRY??
 
2012-04-17 07:40:27 PM
LewDux: Link (new window)

Um, so? Wow! Polyphonic synths finally are massed produced and easy to use and a bunch of Brits started using them! What does that have to do with my post?

Ishkur: Yes, but most people want their electronic music to be interesting and coherent, not just self-indulgent, masterbatory, noodly wankery.

Henry Holland: No matter what you think of ELP's music


Reading comprehension, learn it.
 
2012-04-17 07:48:47 PM

Ishkur: Henry Holland: No mention of this guy?

Yes, but most people want their electronic music to be interesting and coherent, not just self-indulgent, masterbatory, noodly wankery.


This. There was a huge amount of people who thought getting stoned and twisting VCFs and gates was 'music'.
 
2012-04-17 09:10:10 PM
I have nothing to contribute that hasn't already been said, so here's another parody album cover:

2.bp.blogspot.com

/Hot like The Model
 
2012-04-17 11:14:13 PM
If you dismiss Keith Emerson you should turn to critiquing watercolours, because you don't understand creative musical composition.
 
2012-04-18 12:53:35 AM
LewDux: Ultimately these experiments brought about an innovative 1971 album, The Bley/Peacock^ Synthesizer Show^ /Link (new window)

Your last link goes to a Goldfrapp video but the other two, are you serious? The first one, George Harrison was more adventurous on Abbey Road that that clip and the second one, hahahahaha, wacka-wacka early 70's jazz-funk with someone making synth noises in the background.

Please.

I've had a chance to watch synthpop doc more extensively than I did this morning at work.

Of course, being a British doc about pop music, it gets stupid pretty quickly: showing ELP in 1973 as an example of the Big Bad Rich Rock stars (and universities and people like Wendy Carlos and.....) only being able to afford synths.....by having him play a grand total of 8 notes on the Moog, the rest being the Hammond, of course. Of course, the mouthy twat Phil Oakey at 7:45 or so repeats the lie that by the late 70's " to be in a band you had to have learnt your instrument for 8 or 9 years before you would DARE come out and play it" bullshiat. Really now? Seems The MC5, The Stooges, New York Dolls and all the UK glam bands didn't get that memo. Don't blame ELP because you wanted to be a pop star more than a musician and polyphonic preset synths allowed you to do that.

The next thing I noticed is how far behind technology-wise the British were. The Polymoog was mass produced in 1975, the Prophet 5 (memory, polyphony) in 1978. Yes, they were expensive but then the doc praises Giorgio Moroder for being a pioneer by...wait for it...showing him in a studio with very expensive equipment. Then there's Daniel Miller of Mute doing his talking head bit in front of...*sigh*....a modular Moog. Oh wait! There's John Foxx getting filmed in front of one too! Jeebus. Then there's Gary Numan getting blown away by a note from a Minimoog: "I'd never heard anything like that before". You must not have been listening very hard then, they'd been around since 1970. By 1981 or 1982, you could get a Minimoog used for $500, no one wanted them at the time, though they're highly sought after by collectors now.

Of course, the guy from Spandau Ballet gives the game away: with preset polysynths, you could just press buttons and have the basis of songs, none of that horrid "learning to play" nonsense. Then there's the bits where they wheel out the Linn Drum ($5000 in 1980 = $13,000 now) and the Fairlight CMI ($29,000 in 1980 = $75,000 now) and show them being used interspersed with grim Northern England landscapes and social unrest. The makers of the doc seem completely oblivious to how they present their ideas.

Ah, got it, if you're doing the *right* kind of music according to the hipsters of the day, you get a pass, otherwise, you're just a rich rock star lording it over the proles with your modular Moog. I love Depeche Mode, OMD and others from that era, but what me and my friends were disappointed with was how boring the sounds they got were. By the time the Linn and Fairlight and Korg DX-7 were in common use ca. 1983 (where the doc ends), the records *did* sound the same, there was very little imagination used: the same boring snare sound, the Minimoog bass sound that Emerson was using in 1971, the wash of strings that sounded like a bad Mellotron, the same lead synth sound that Rick Wakeman rode in to the ground by 1975 etc. They had the technology to really go deep with sound and so much of it just sounded like stuff that you'd bash out on a guitar after only playing for six months but done on a Korg 700S.

3.bp.blogspot.com

solitary: Where's the love for PIERRE HENRY??

Indeed, Pierre Schaeffer too.
 
2012-04-18 12:59:52 AM
Ha! I found an interview article (new window) with DEVO from 1978. Among other interesting things, they mention Kraftwerk.

"Synapse: By the way, speaking of limited sounds, how did you like the new Kraftwerk album?

DEVO: Oh, the disco one. It sounded like disco. A lot of it sounded like a rip-off of Giorgio Morodor. It sounded a little dry.

Synapse: It was very dry. I liked the album; I didn't expect to.

DEVO: I heard they were getting robots to play the music on stage so they could watch their own concerts."
 
2012-04-18 10:06:02 AM

Mr_Fabulous: barefoot in the head: The first radio song I recall having a true electronic feel was "Telstar" by the Tornados (new window)

True Fact: that was the #1 song in the USA on the day I was born. Great song, too.


I feel even more lame that the #1 song in the USA the day I was born was Land Down Under by Men at Work.
 
2012-04-18 03:07:20 PM

Henry Holland: Please.


i3.kym-cdn.com
 
2012-04-18 03:24:04 PM

Henry Holland: ...


CLIP....
your history is a little off and you miss some key things. Roland and Korg sold many synths in the UK in the 1970's. Daniel Miller's ARP 2600 was used for many Mute albums. the SCI Pro-One was a favorite of Vince Clark - listen to the Yazoo stuff.

the music of today was influenced by those who listened to those who listen to those who listened to those influenced by the Krautrock and Kraftwerk.

i suggest you pickup a copy of "The Grey Matter" cd - it's an excellent history listen in electronic music as are the "Brief History of Ambient" Vols 1 &2.
 
2012-04-18 03:27:14 PM
i left off Pink Farking Floyd, does the Putney ring a bell Henry?
 
2012-04-18 03:54:17 PM

Ishkur: Henry Holland: No mention of this guy?

Yes, but most people want their electronic music to be interesting and coherent, not just self-indulgent, masterbatory, noodly wankery.


Ishkur, I've recommended your "Guide" to numerous people, and generally have a great respect for your opinions and analyses, but I have to take slight issue with this.

What leads you to believe that the tastes of "most" electronic music fans are noticeably different from those of "most" fans of any other genre? I submit that in all categories of music, there is a stultifying glut of "self-indulgent, mast/e/urbatory, noodly wankery," and that a depressingly large proportion of the target demographic are more than happy to gobble it right up.

I also would not classify ELP as electronic music, but as rock music with electronic elements. Their work was aimed at a different audience, and with different purpose, than that of the majority of artists mentioned in this thread.

Having said that, I must now confess to a great love for ELP's Pictures at an Exhibition. Emerson's work on that album bridges Mussorgsky's original piano piece and Ravel's orchestral arrangement, in my opinion highlighting the better aspects of each while adding texture through electronics.

/Also, if ANYONE tries to tell me that Carl Palmer isn't a brilliant percussionist, I'll whack 'em in the head with a gong.
 
2012-04-18 04:43:06 PM

Lord Thorn: Emerson's work on that album bridges Mussorgsky's original piano piece and Ravel's orchestral arrangement


Y'know, BT recently did a Reddit AMA and someone asked him about dubstep. I shiat you not, BT's word-for-word reply was: "I think that dubstep is the most exciting, procedural application of sound design in EDM."

Yes, because that's what people listen to music for. Procedural application of sound design.

...
..
.
I want you to read the part of your post that I quoted above to yourself out loud ten times.
 
2012-04-18 11:05:26 PM

Ishkur: Lord Thorn: Emerson's work on that album bridges Mussorgsky's original piano piece and Ravel's orchestral arrangement

... because that's what people listen to music for. Procedural application of sound design.

...
..
.
I want you to read the part of your post that I quoted above to yourself out loud ten times.


What an earth-shattering revelation. Ladies and gentlemen, Ishkur understands, as has no one else before him, why people listen to music. I, on the other hand, only claim to understand some part of why I enjoy a particular piece of music. I am well and truly humbled.
 
2012-04-19 01:08:39 AM

Lord Thorn: What an earth-shattering revelation.


bloggingblue.com
 
2012-04-19 05:14:01 PM
Ishkur:

Ooooh, consider me told then.

asciibaron: your history is a little off and you miss some key things. Roland and Korg sold many synths in the UK in the 1970's

Of course they did, I was pointing out that more technologically advanced stuff like the Prophet 5 lagged behind in England. Plus, why do people like Phil Oakey act that it wasn't until The Great Punk Awakening Of 1977 that cheap(er), easier to use synths magically appeared in UK music dealerships? I know it's punk/post-punk Gospel that everything that happened before The Ramones toured the UK except those things on the approved list is erased from history, but fark that.

Tony Banks started using a preset ARP Pro Soloist in 1973, fairly cheap, easily programmable monosynths didn't just magically appear in 1978-1980 like that doc implies.

Most of all, I was just laughing at the utterly clueless hypocrisy of a bunch of guys who all have criticized Keith Emerson for using his modular Moog, using it as a prime example of decadent rock star self-indulgence, appearing in that kinda shiatty documentary sitting in front of.....modular Moogs and its knockoffs like ARP's and Buchla's.

Daniel Miller's ARP 2600 was used for many Mute albums

Again, another expensive Moog ripoff that was around long before he started Mute. My god, Elton John was using one in 1972 (on Rocket Man).

Daniel Miller and his cohorts stood on the back of giants, people were doing the stuff they get praised for up to 20 years before they were. I detest a lack of historical knowledge and I absolutely loathe the punk/post-punk tendency to selectively re-write/erase the history of stuff that came before them to fit their politically tinged aesthetic agendas. It's like reading an interview with one of the guys from Buzzcocks who sheepishly admitted, yeah, he loved Close to the Edge and Yes. You sure as hell don't read that in most punk histories, ELP and Yes and Pink Floyd weren't responsible for Thatcher either.

i left off Pink Farking Floyd, does the Putney ring a bell Henry?

Yes, you dork, I've seen the Live at Pompeii movie more times than you've had hot dinners. "It's a bad cut, that's all". I've been a synthesizer geek since this came out in 1968, were you even born yet?:

ecx.images-amazon.com

Here, I'll make it simple for you. My comments were confined to my reactions to that doc that was linked. I'm always suspicious of BBC/ITV docs because they almost always have an agenda based in class/political events peculiar to England.

In this case, it's: everything before punk that isn't part of the approved, hip narrative is to be whitewashed or ignored altogether. Keith Emerson had a huge impact on the use of the synthesizer in rock/pop music (how many times have I read a musician say "The first time I heard a Moog was at the end of Lucky Man"?) and he was crucial in making them road-worthy, stable and polyphonic. To use a clip of him in a documentary about synthesizers in pop music where he barely plays his Moog and using him as the poster boy of All That Was Wrong With Pop Music Until Punk Came Along is laughable, I don't give a damn if anyone likes the music he makes or any other aspect of ELP, but give the dude credit where it's due.

i suggest you pickup a copy of "The Grey Matter" cd - it's an excellent history listen in electronic music as are the "Brief History of Ambient" Vols 1 &2

I like how you automatically assume I haven't heard those. I can play that game, how about *you* listened to this:

ecx.images-amazon.com

or some Pierre Henry or Pierre Schaeffer or the dozens of classical composers who did electronic pieces in the 50's and 60's? What's your favorite Stockhausen piece?

the music of today was influenced by those who listened to those who listen to those who listened to those influenced by the Krautrock and Kraftwerk.

Ah, the "Krautrock and Kraftwerk appeared on the music scene fully formed, they had NO influences themselves" derp derp derp derp. Kraftwerk wasn't even original when they started using synthesizers, the basis of their sound that everyone went nuts for on Trans-Europe Express was basically in place by 1969 when Gershon Kingsley had a hit with the song Popcorn.

I get it, the winners get to write history, but still.
 
2012-04-20 02:11:23 AM

Henry Holland: LewDux: Ultimately these experiments brought about an innovative 1971 album, The Bley/Peacock^ Synthesizer Show^ /Link (new window)

Your last link goes to a Goldfrapp video but the other two, are you serious? The first one, George Harrison was more adventurous on Abbey Road that that clip and the second one, hahahahaha, wacka-wacka early 70's jazz-funk with someone making synth noises in the background.

Please.

That post had nothing to do with you, your Keith or your George



I've had a chance to watch synthpop doc more extensively than I did this morning at work.

Of course, being a British doc about pop music, it gets stupid pretty quickly: showing ELP in 1973 as an example of the Big Bad Rich Rock stars (and universities and people like Wendy Carlos and.....) only being able to afford synths.....by having him play a grand total of 8 notes on the Moog, the rest being the Hammond, of course. Of course, the mouthy twat Phil Oakey at 7:45 or so repeats the lie that by the late 70's " to be in a band you had to have learnt your instrument for 8 or 9 years before you would DARE come out and play it" bullshiat. Really now? Seems The MC5, The Stooges, New York Dolls and all the UK glam bands didn't get that memo. Don't blame ELP because you wanted to be a pop star more than a musician and polyphonic preset synths allowed you to do that.

The next thing I noticed is how far behind technology-wise the British were. The Polymoog was mass produced in 1975, the Prophet 5 (memory, polyphony) in 1978. Yes, they were expensive but then the doc praises Giorgio Moroder for being a pioneer by...wait for it...showing him in a studio with very expensive equipment. Then there's Daniel Miller of Mute doing his talking head bit in front of...*sigh*....a modular Moog. Oh wait! There's John Foxx getting filmed in front of one too! Jeebus. Then there's Gary Numan getting blown away by a note from a Minimoog: "I'd never heard anything like that before". You must not have been listening very hard then, they'd been around since 1970. By 1981 or 19 ...

Bloody peasants, no respect for Keith The Fabulous

 
2012-04-20 02:14:25 AM

Henry Holland: I get it, the winners get to write history, but still.


Exactly, no time for losers
 
2012-04-20 10:04:16 AM
LewDux: That post had nothing to do with you, your Keith or your George

Oh, so you just wanted to post links to shiatty music, got it.

Bloody peasants, no respect for Keith The Fabulous

Agrees:
quizilla.teennick.com

Exactly, no time for losers

Agrees:
www.corbisimages.com
 
2012-04-20 10:44:20 AM

Henry Holland: Oh, so you just wanted to post links to shiatty music, got it.


You like Keith Emerson
 
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