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(Huffington Post)   How German electro-pop pioneers Kraftwerk predicted the future of the world's technology   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 97
    More: Interesting, Kraftwerk  
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4969 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 17 Apr 2012 at 12:10 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-04-17 12:11:51 AM
farm8.staticflickr.com

Approves
 
2012-04-17 12:13:47 AM
culture.com

Kraftwerk, Falco, Hasselhoff?
 
2012-04-17 12:14:40 AM
I'm the operator of my pocket calculator.
 
2012-04-17 12:16:45 AM
primeloops.com
 
2012-04-17 12:19:26 AM
BESERKER!!
 
2012-04-17 12:20:10 AM
Tour de France Soundtracks is a hell of an album.
 
2012-04-17 12:21:50 AM
"Kraftwerk's Rolf Hütter is too smart to claim credit for inventing electronic music. "

cuz he didn't.
 
2012-04-17 12:28:01 AM

Snapper Carr: "Kraftwerk's Rolf Hütter is too smart to claim credit for inventing electronic music. "

cuz he didn't.


Everyone knows that was Autobahn.

i39.tinypic.com
 
2012-04-17 12:29:47 AM
I saw the word "German" in the headline and misread the next word as electro-poop.
 
2012-04-17 12:34:53 AM

Spaced Lion: Snapper Carr: "Kraftwerk's Rolf Hütter is too smart to claim credit for inventing electronic music. "

cuz he didn't.

Everyone knows that was Autobahn.

[i39.tinypic.com image 325x325]


First, Autobahn is an album by the Kraftwerks.

Secondly, Wendy Carlos and Forbidden Planet soundtrack are just two earlier electronic music things that pop to mind.
 
2012-04-17 12:38:18 AM

12349876: First, Autobahn is an album by the Kraftwerks.


It's also a parody of the band from The Big Lebowski
 
2012-04-17 12:38:58 AM
It's more fun to compute, however.
 
2012-04-17 12:45:39 AM

12349876: Secondly, Wendy Carlos and Forbidden Planet soundtrack are just two earlier electronic music things that pop to mind.


so you mena theremin back in 1928 ....
Link (new window)
 
2012-04-17 12:45:59 AM

12349876: Spaced Lion: Snapper Carr: "Kraftwerk's Rolf Hütter is too smart to claim credit for inventing electronic music. "

cuz he didn't.

Everyone knows that was Autobahn.

[i39.tinypic.com image 325x325]

First, Autobahn is an album by the Kraftwerks.

Secondly, Wendy Carlos and Forbidden Planet soundtrack are just two earlier electronic music things that pop to mind.


Oskar Sala (new window) predates both by decades.
 
2012-04-17 12:53:36 AM
I heard Autobahn in middle school, and was hooked. Those guys may not have originated electronic music, but they did some great things with it.
 
2012-04-17 12:54:17 AM
Lots of cool artists contributed to electronic music. Kraftwerk just happened to have better PR.

It's fun to explore all the other stuff. Seriously dig Yellow Magic Orchestra, Koto, Art of Noise, early Jean-Michel Jarre (Ethnicolor is a freaky, freaky track), Laurie Anderson, Yello, and in before 12 year old noise kids start blathering on and on about Stockhausen.

Who's overrated.

(Raymond Scott FTW)
 
2012-04-17 12:54:36 AM

Gordon Bennett: 12349876: Spaced Lion: Snapper Carr: "Kraftwerk's Rolf Hütter is too smart to claim credit for inventing electronic music. "

cuz he didn't.

Everyone knows that was Autobahn.

[i39.tinypic.com image 325x325]

First, Autobahn is an album by the Kraftwerks.

Secondly, Wendy Carlos and Forbidden Planet soundtrack are just two earlier electronic music things that pop to mind.

Oskar Sala (new window) predates both by decades.


I wasn't going for the absolute first in my post, I was just pointing two incredibly popular examples of electronic music that popped in my head without having to get on Wikipedia.
 
2012-04-17 12:55:11 AM

Snapper Carr: 12349876: First, Autobahn is an album by the Kraftwerks.

It's also a parody of the band from The Big Lebowski


electronic music fans have no sense of humor

/they're nihilists
 
2012-04-17 12:56:32 AM

Gordon Bennett: Oskar Sala (new window) predates both by decades.


Trautonium - 1929 (new window)
which is second to the theremin ....

dammit (new window)

In 1897 Thaddeus Cahill patented an instrument called the Telharmonium
 
2012-04-17 01:03:42 AM

Snapper Carr: 12349876: First, Autobahn is an album by the Kraftwerks.

It's also a parody of the band from The Big Lebowski


i42.tinypic.com
 
2012-04-17 01:07:47 AM
Many good things came out of Germany's electronic music scene

i.imgur.com

/included but not limited to
 
2012-04-17 01:13:18 AM
i still like Ralph und Florian
 
2012-04-17 01:17:51 AM

12349876: Gordon Bennett: 12349876: Spaced Lion: Snapper Carr: "Kraftwerk's Rolf Hütter is too smart to claim credit for inventing electronic music. "

cuz he didn't.

Everyone knows that was Autobahn.

[i39.tinypic.com image 325x325]

First, Autobahn is an album by the Kraftwerks.

Secondly, Wendy Carlos and Forbidden Planet soundtrack are just two earlier electronic music things that pop to mind.

Oskar Sala (new window) predates both by decades.

I wasn't going for the absolute first in my post, I was just pointing two incredibly popular examples of electronic music that popped in my head without having to get on Wikipedia.


Yes, I wasn't trying to correct you, just adding to the conversation. In retrospect it does come off rather more snippy than intended. Mea culpa.
 
2012-04-17 01:19:13 AM
Kraftwerk is a joke because they have all this electronic stuff and all they have to do is press down a special key and it plays a little melody.
 
2012-04-17 01:36:52 AM
Numbers is my favorite song evar.
 
2012-04-17 01:42:09 AM
new.assets.thequietus.com
 
2012-04-17 01:47:28 AM

She comes in colors everywhere: Snapper Carr: 12349876: First, Autobahn is an album by the Kraftwerks.

It's also a parody of the band from The Big Lebowski

electronic music fans have no sense of humor

/they're nihilists


That must be exhausting.
 
2012-04-17 01:58:20 AM
The first time I ever heard Kraftwerk, yeah I saw it in the theater... (new window)

/yeah I'm that old
//want to hear good old-school stuff?
///skatefm.com (new window)
 
2012-04-17 02:33:57 AM

She comes in colors everywhere: Snapper Carr: 12349876: First, Autobahn is an album by the Kraftwerks.

It's also a parody of the band from The Big Lebowski

electronic music fans have no sense of humor

/they're nihilists


No those men are cowards.
 
2012-04-17 02:46:40 AM
Nothing could make me want to hate electronic music more than this thread.
 
2012-04-17 03:33:13 AM
NO NO NO, article writer. Kraftwerk did not invent anything! Stop pressing this notion.

There was a HUGE electronic music scene in the 70s of which Kraftwerk were simply an important part. Kraftwerk did do one thing special, which I'll get to in a sec, but to say that they alone were responsible for the triumph of electronic music is doing a serious disservice to the legions of other experimental composers in the 70s like Bruce Haak, Tangerine Dream, Neu!, Can, Vangelis, Giorgio Moroder, Jean Michel Jarre, Brian Eno, Wendy Carlos, Morton Subotnik, Edgar Varese, Karlheinz Stockhausen, John Cage, Terry Reilley, Steve Roach or Robert farking Moog.

BUT....

All of them seem to use electronic instruments as a way to experiment with new sounds and textures, to enhance their existing repertoire, and none of them paid too much attention to rhythm and percussion.

That is the one thing Kraftwerk did better than all the electronic pioneers of the time: Percussion. They were impeccable percussionists. They built their own electronic drumkits a decade before the first drum machines would hit the market. Their attention to detail was expertly employed in the rhythm and grooves of their drum tracks.

Kraftwerk were trying to capture the machine sounds of every day urban industrial living. Automotive factories, factory presses, washers and dryers, and the unrelenting grinding yawn of a futuristic society increasingly dominated by technology. The fact that they always passed themselves off as unemotional robots in their live shows was part of that.

It is for this reason that their music stands out: Their plinky-plonky brand of technopop, which made kitschy little rhythms, made fans out of middle class Detroit black youth. Kraftwerk tracks were excellent for sampling and it's their influence that gave rise to electro, techno, hip hop and modern electronic dance music as we know it.
 
2012-04-17 03:47:21 AM
www.shanghai247.net
 
2012-04-17 04:46:04 AM
Mort Garson.

hair - 1969 (new window)
 
2012-04-17 05:50:28 AM
I've got a brand new combine harvester and I give you the keys
 
2012-04-17 07:42:14 AM
Link (new window)

Link (new window)

Link (new window)
/Link(new window)
 
2012-04-17 08:20:25 AM

Spaced Lion: i42.tinypic.com


I'm pretty sure the point is that the number named guy didn't get the joke.

Also, I think not getting a Big Lebowski reference on Fark is grounds for summary execution. Can we get a rule check? Sorry, 12349876, if it comes back yes, I think you have to climb into the bathtub with a toaster. Rules are rules.
 
2012-04-17 08:24:06 AM
Damn, I thought this would be an article about advancements in cybernetics...

=Smidge=
/The Man Machine, machine, ma-chine, ma-chine, machine, machine, ma-chine, ma-chine... ma-chine...
 
2012-04-17 09:13:26 AM

Ishkur: NO NO NO, article writer. Kraftwerk did not invent anything! Stop pressing this notion.

There was a HUGE electronic music scene in the 70s of which Kraftwerk were simply an important part. Kraftwerk did do one thing special, which I'll get to in a sec, but to say that they alone were responsible for the triumph of electronic music is doing a serious disservice to the legions of other experimental composers in the 70s like Bruce Haak, Tangerine Dream, Neu!, Can, Vangelis, Giorgio Moroder, Jean Michel Jarre, Brian Eno, Wendy Carlos, Morton Subotnik, Edgar Varese, Karlheinz Stockhausen, John Cage, Terry Reilley, Steve Roach or Robert farking Moog.

BUT....

All of them seem to use electronic instruments as a way to experiment with new sounds and textures, to enhance their existing repertoire, and none of them paid too much attention to rhythm and percussion.

That is the one thing Kraftwerk did better than all the electronic pioneers of the time: Percussion. They were impeccable percussionists. They built their own electronic drumkits a decade before the first drum machines would hit the market. Their attention to detail was expertly employed in the rhythm and grooves of their drum tracks.

Kraftwerk were trying to capture the machine sounds of every day urban industrial living. Automotive factories, factory presses, washers and dryers, and the unrelenting grinding yawn of a futuristic society increasingly dominated by technology. The fact that they always passed themselves off as unemotional robots in their live shows was part of that.

It is for this reason that their music stands out: Their plinky-plonky brand of technopop, which made kitschy little rhythms, made fans out of middle class Detroit black youth. Kraftwerk tracks were excellent for sampling and it's their influence that gave rise to electro, techno, hip hop and modern electronic dance music as we know it.


That's some good commenting. Those artists were not making the kind of music Kraftwerk gave us with Autobahn but, even before that record was released, there was pop electronic. Hot Butter's version of "Popcorn" was on radio every day for quite a stretch. Kraftwerk turned the sound cool and the song was great for driving.
 
2012-04-17 09:20:50 AM
The first radio song I recall having a true electronic feel was "Telstar" by the Tornados (new window)
 
2012-04-17 09:35:19 AM
Edgar Varese would like a word.
 
2012-04-17 09:37:51 AM

ArkAngel: [farm8.staticflickr.com image 507x359]

Approves


Ha! First thing I thought of too upon reading the headline.
 
2012-04-17 09:38:10 AM
Because they're FRICKIN' AWESOME!!!!
 
2012-04-17 09:48:46 AM

Porous Horace: Kraftwerk is a joke because they have all this electronic stuff and all they have to do is press down a special key and it plays a little melody.


+111P11K11Uq010010 (Translation: I see what you did there).
 
2012-04-17 10:09:13 AM

moike: The first time I ever heard Kraftwerk, yeah I saw it in the theater... (new window)

/yeah I'm that old
//want to hear good old-school stuff?
///skatefm.com (new window)


I'll see your skatefm and raise you one SomaFM (new window)
 
2012-04-17 10:30:06 AM

Ishkur: NO NO NO, article writer. Kraftwerk did not invent anything! Stop pressing this notion....


Neat, didn't know you were a Farker. I refer people to your guide fairly often, after finding out about it from the professor of a writing course I took called "On the Boundary Between Music and Noise." Best "writing" class I could have taken, and learned a ton about the history of experimental music.
 
2012-04-17 10:41:26 AM
Well, crap, everything I was going to say has been said.

/sadface
 
2012-04-17 10:44:41 AM
I grew up listening to Kraftwerk. My uncle was a huge fan and had all their records and to discover them as an eight-year old was a delight.
 
2012-04-17 10:52:29 AM
Glowsticks and Vaporub out. [Jackpot777 is on the f*****g decks](http://www.mixcrate.com/mix/136756/Jackpot777-151-Point-53-Ment al).
 
2012-04-17 10:54:45 AM
I should stop doing Reddit links. On the ones and twos... (new window)
 
2012-04-17 11:00:48 AM
 
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