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(The Atlantic)   Cybercrime statistics are wildly overblown, which means we've all been lied to about the need for additional Cyberpolice funding   (theatlantic.com) divider line 28
    More: Interesting, cybercrimes, statistics  
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1125 clicks; posted to Geek » on 16 Apr 2012 at 11:33 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-04-16 08:40:02 PM
We should just lock up everyone at birth and let them out as they prove their trustworthiness. Seems to be where we're headed anyway.
 
2012-04-16 09:05:19 PM
www.comewatchme.com

YOU DUN GOOFED, CYBERCRIME STATISTICIANS!
 
2012-04-16 09:33:14 PM
But what will I do with that Crowne College degree in Cyberpolice Investigations now?
 
2012-04-16 10:06:09 PM
www.clay-collins.com
 
2012-04-16 10:31:42 PM
You mean, my "8 billion dollar" iPod isn't 8 billion dollars?
 
2012-04-16 11:15:25 PM

Ed Finnerty: YOU DUN GOOFED, CYBERCRIME STATISTICIANS!


Came here for this.
 
2012-04-16 11:31:59 PM
Computer criminals could bring our economy to its knees. A hacker destroyed my mp3 player and destroyed over $8 billion worth of illegally downloaded songs.
 
2012-04-16 11:36:27 PM
They're trashing our rights, man!
They're trashing the flow of data!
Trashing!
Trashing!
Trashing!

Hack the planet!
 
2012-04-16 11:44:39 PM
Who then will I report my backtracing to?
 
2012-04-16 11:45:45 PM
But what am I going to do with all this retro-futuristic police gear? Do you know what the payments are on a hovercar?
 
2012-04-16 11:50:40 PM
blog.evantahler.com
 
2012-04-17 12:05:57 AM
Of course the stats are overblown, that's why the FBI had Sabu direct #antisec to engage in some high profile hacks (new window). They had to prop up the numbers and create a problem so they could solve it.
 
2012-04-17 12:08:42 AM
"Jake Bullet, Cybernautics Division."

"That's traffic control!"
 
2012-04-17 12:48:44 AM
Most "cybersecurity" spending and activities provide little bang for the buck and many are actually counterproductive. The vast majority of of security incidents, including nearly every single large publicized event in recent memory, are due to lapses in the basic things people should have already been doing. This includes technology, policies and business processes. You can spend a million dollars on fancy web filtering appliances, firewalls, IPS, etc. but it's all for naught if you're letting people take 100,000 patient records home with them on an unencrypted laptop or flash drive.

If there is one magic bullet to security, it's this.... housekeeping. Keep your shiat clean and organized, know what assets you have and where they are, patch your systems, remove old system accounts, encrypt your sensitive data, etc. and you'll protect yourself from the bulk of the potential threats out there. It's boring, you may not get to add another shiny new box to your rack, but it works. Check out the Top 20 Security Controls from SANS. None of them require a huge increase in spending, mostly a reprioritization of things your IT crew is already (or should be) doing.
 
2012-04-17 02:18:24 AM
i.cdn.turner.com
RIP

/no seriously, he died
//i dont think a thread about it ever went green
 
2012-04-17 02:25:30 AM
BretMavrik
If there is one magic bullet to security, it's
this.... housekeeping.
`
Simple and true.
 
2012-04-17 02:36:13 AM

NewportBarGuy: We should just lock up everyone at birth and let them out as they prove their trustworthiness. Seems to be where we're headed anyway.


andrewsidea.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-04-17 03:01:34 AM

Cyno01: [i.cdn.turner.com image 200x275]
RIP

/no seriously, he died


Wow, heart attack. I don't think anyone saw that coming.
 
2012-04-17 06:39:08 AM
I doubt they're that overblown. A LOT of cyber crime is committed by China, Russia, and other unscrupulous countries. Rampant IP theft, industrial sabotage, DDOSs are a daily occurrence.

We had a Chinese customer in the NOC the other day who couldn't believe that we don't attack our competitors over the network. To the Chinese, that's just part of doing business.

Cyber crime is a lot more than just punk script kiddie high schoolers defacing wordpress sites.
 
2012-04-17 07:07:55 AM

hogans: "Jake Bullet, Cybernautics Division."

"That's traffic control!"


I don't know what that's from, but that made me laugh out loud.
 
2012-04-17 07:09:02 AM

Cyno01: RIP

/no seriously, he died
//i dont think a thread about it ever went green


The consequences never were the same :(
 
2012-04-17 07:47:37 AM
YOU CAN'T CUT FUNDING! YOU'RE GOING TO REGRET THIS!!
 
2012-04-17 09:48:23 AM

Honest Bender: Cyber crime is a lot more than just punk script kiddie high schoolers defacing wordpress sites.


And it's a lot less than foreign organized crime stealing billions a day.

When you steal a database of 33 million records, and the estimated value of each record is $30, what you're really stealing is a database worth up to a billion dollars, not a billion dollars of data. Consider that the sensitive information is encrypted but susceptible on some level to brute force. Right there you may have easily lost 70% of your billion dollars to the simple fact that it's not worth the time to break anything but the lowest hanging fruit. Then you have junk data that's not actually worth anything (old, expired cards, SSNs of dead people, fat-fingered data) that reduces it further, plus the data actually has to be something that can be monetized. By the time you crack the data, you've also lost the people who know about the breach and have canceled cards or put up credit alerts.

This report doesn't say cybercrime isn't serious or costly, but I have no hard time believing its conclusion that estimates of loss are wildly exaggerated. Too often the media and analysts report the potential value of the data assuming every bit can be monetized, but that's just ridiculously unrealistic in the vast majority of breaches. I'd wager huge swaths of stolen data never even gets decrypted, never mind all the bogus and historical data that one finds in most databases on top of it. Hell, even once good data is sold off and used, most people lose, what, a few hundred bucks before they notice something's wrong and report the problem to a bank?
 
2012-04-17 11:09:26 AM

BretMavrik: but it's all for naught if you're letting people take 100,000 patient records home with them on an unencrypted laptop or flash drive.


I have close to 100,000 pt records on this laptop, so I'm getting a kick...

/the password is bongoDong
 
2012-04-17 11:22:25 AM

Splinshints: When you steal a database of 33 million records


Stolen information is only a small part of it. What about stolen intellectual property? And I'm not talking about MP3's. I'm talking about manufacturing processes, software components, etc. Then there's also destruction of data. Downtime from DDOS attacks is also very real.

I generally make an active effort to be at least somewhat insulting. This is fark after all. So try to understand when I say this: No insult intended, but I don't think you grasp the full scale and breadth of modern cyber crime. It's a lot more than stolen social security numbers and database leaks.
 
2012-04-17 12:15:14 PM
Dear FARK,
Did the Obvious tag die laughing?
 
2012-04-17 01:49:57 PM

demaL-demaL-yeH: Dear FARK,
Did the Obvious tag die laughing?


the obvious tag is taking care of their stolen identity.
 
2012-04-17 05:57:29 PM
4.bp.blogspot.com
 
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