Do you have adblock enabled?
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Phys Org2)   What happens when everyone has a replicator at home?   (phys.org) divider line 108
    More: Interesting, Atlantic Council, auto parts, fuselages, hip replacement surgery, printer driver, paraphernalia, clocks  
•       •       •

6562 clicks; posted to Geek » on 14 Apr 2012 at 8:44 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



108 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-04-14 01:43:42 PM  
Replicators are boring. It's the holodecks that have the potential to wipe out mankind. Why bother having a real relationship that you know will just end up with her throwing your crap out on the front lawn (or jettisoning it into vacuum) if all you need to do is download a copy of the latest Playboy Playmate, program her to think your nerdy pimply buttocks are the sexiest thing ever, and then have it it with vigor and enthusiasm?

If they ever invent the holodeck, and it's freely accessible to all men, women will need to find some way to reproduce via parthenogenesis. Because all of us guys are going to in there in our "King Bagumpity, the Virile" simulations boning our way through an entire empire of hot chicks. And no, the knowledge that they aren't "real" won't bother us. Fake bewbs don't, so why should fake everything?
 
2012-04-14 02:03:23 PM  

bagumpity: It's the holodecks that have the potential to wipe out mankind. Why bother having a real relationship that you know will just end up with her throwing your crap out on the front lawn (or jettisoning it into vacuum) if all you need to do is download a copy of the latest Playboy Playmate, program her to think your nerdy pimply buttocks are the sexiest thing ever, and then have it it with vigor and enthusiasm?


Holodecks? With a replicator, you'd be able to make a realdoll that looks like anybody (or anything) you want, and behaves just the way you want. And when you get tired of it, you can recycle it and make a new one.

(hey, OP! how advanced is this replicator you're talking about?)
 
2012-04-14 02:07:17 PM  

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: There's a lot more to lawbreaking than what anyone "can" do.


I think that is the crux of the matter.
What the prohibitionists believe is that outlawing *this thing* will result in a better humanity. But the sum total of the work that goes into making those laws stick ends up doing more damage to everyone than *said thing* ever has.
For the want of ridding the nation of a few opium dens, terrorists, and shooting ranges, we created a series of organizations that have run amuck on the american landscape. The fear of uncontrolled production will likely empower a new generation of copyright tyrants with their own brand of federal agency that lacks restraint or oversight.
So where the ATF has yet to prove they've stopped a single gun rampage (but has shot hundred of moonshiners), the TSA yet to prove they've prevented a terrorist incident (but frisked everyone's grandma), and the DEA yet to prove they've halted a drug use pandemic (but thrown countless black people in jail), we will have a new terror in everyone's replication shop. One that is too busy looking in the cupboards for unlicensed Disney products to bother explaining how that is making the nation a better place to live.

The end of scarcity still wont save us from ourselves.
 
2012-04-14 02:15:39 PM  
No references to Neil Stephenson's Diamond Age?

Fark, I am disappoint.
 
2012-04-14 02:34:27 PM  

Guidette Frankentits: 1) Scan this image


replicator:
www.cs.technion.ac.il
 
2012-04-14 02:44:28 PM  

Wenchmaster: No references to Neil Stephenson's Diamond Age?

Fark, I am disappoint.


It took longer to show up then I thought it should but it occurred before your post.
 
2012-04-14 03:34:29 PM  
Real Doll here I come...

//figuratively, I swear.
 
2012-04-14 03:36:02 PM  
Your maker will become dependent on the drugs it can synthesize?

24.media.tumblr.com
 
2012-04-14 03:44:07 PM  

fluffy2097: t3knomanser: BigSlowTarget: Gun control becomes a total joke.

Chances are if you have a lathe capable of making a rifled barrel, you probably have the skills to know what metal to make a barrel from.


You don't rifle barrels on a lathe, you either use a button rifling rig or a cut rifling rig. Cut rifling is easier to do at home - because the cutter is easier to make and uselink1; link2

You'll need to build a gundrilling rig, too - which you can make from an old lathe. You'll need to make your own gundrill bits, too.

If you want an off-the-books firearm, I'd suggest looking at the AR-15 - you only need to fabricate the lower receiver (and it's a low-stressed part); you can buy everything else.
 
2012-04-14 03:54:16 PM  

fta

When he put it up on a wall and pushed the counterweight, it went ticktock.

"It wasn't very accurate, but it was a functioning clock," Schmitt said.


What happens when everyone has a replicator at home?

Apparently we'll all have crappy clocks, subby.
 
2012-04-14 04:32:09 PM  

Ishkur: Guidette Frankentits: 1) Scan this image

replicator:
[www.cs.technion.ac.il image 544x491]


narwhaler.com
 
2012-04-14 04:36:31 PM  
AdrienVeidt

Sure, maybe, sure. The interesting thing about living creatures would be 'turning it on', I'd think. You can't have a properly functioning half-a-cell, so you'd have to assemble it in a ground-energy state then zap it with some electricity to kick into gear. Similarly, you can't have a properly functioning half-an-organism.

Or something.


Living things run on complex chemical reactions and simple electrical circuits, I don't think we need to worry about quantum states. A replicator with electron resolution should be fine.

Could it be used as a transporter? I'm not going first - I would expect any transported person to arrive in incredible pain from having just been disassembled into atoms. No thanks, I'll take the next shuttle down to planet Greenchick.
 
2012-04-14 05:02:28 PM  

way south: Sylvia_Bandersnatch: There's a lot more to lawbreaking than what anyone "can" do.

I think that is the crux of the matter.
What the prohibitionists believe is that outlawing *this thing* will result in a better humanity. But the sum total of the work that goes into making those laws stick ends up doing more damage to everyone than *said thing* ever has.
For the want of ridding the nation of a few opium dens, terrorists, and shooting ranges, we created a series of organizations that have run amuck on the american landscape. The fear of uncontrolled production will likely empower a new generation of copyright tyrants with their own brand of federal agency that lacks restraint or oversight.
So where the ATF has yet to prove they've stopped a single gun rampage (but has shot hundred of moonshiners), the TSA yet to prove they've prevented a terrorist incident (but frisked everyone's grandma), and the DEA yet to prove they've halted a drug use pandemic (but thrown countless black people in jail), we will have a new terror in everyone's replication shop. One that is too busy looking in the cupboards for unlicensed Disney products to bother explaining how that is making the nation a better place to live.

The end of scarcity still wont save us from ourselves.


You're nearly as insane as you are illiterate. Please don't talk to me anymore.
 
2012-04-14 05:36:26 PM  

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: way south: Sylvia_Bandersnatch: There's a lot more to lawbreaking than what anyone "can" do.

I think that is the crux of the matter.
What the prohibitionists believe is that outlawing *this thing* will result in a better humanity. But the sum total of the work that goes into making those laws stick ends up doing more damage to everyone than *said thing* ever has.
For the want of ridding the nation of a few opium dens, terrorists, and shooting ranges, we created a series of organizations that have run amuck on the american landscape. The fear of uncontrolled production will likely empower a new generation of copyright tyrants with their own brand of federal agency that lacks restraint or oversight.
So where the ATF has yet to prove they've stopped a single gun rampage (but has shot hundred of moonshiners), the TSA yet to prove they've prevented a terrorist incident (but frisked everyone's grandma), and the DEA yet to prove they've halted a drug use pandemic (but thrown countless black people in jail), we will have a new terror in everyone's replication shop. One that is too busy looking in the cupboards for unlicensed Disney products to bother explaining how that is making the nation a better place to live.

The end of scarcity still wont save us from ourselves.

You're nearly as insane as you are illiterate. Please don't talk to me anymore.


I was meerly talking around you, not to you.
But as you wish...
 
2012-04-14 05:39:07 PM  

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: TFA explains how this technology may obviate mass production.


TFA is wrong, in that regard. There is always going to be a place for mass production. There really is such a thing as "economies of scale". 3D printers are the exact opposite of "economies of scale". But there are many economies that don't need to scale.

Any case where you need more than one of something, 3D printers are the worst way to make it (you might still use the printer, though- make the buck and then create a mold- I've done a little of that, myself).

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: But that falls short of appreciating it where it could go, what it could be capable of.


No it doesn't. I'm one of the biggest advocates of the future of personal production that you're ever going to meet. I own a MakerBot. I'm just pointing out where it needs to advance, I'm certainly not saying it isn't going to advance.

The most important thing about the current generation of 3D printers is that they're getting multi-axis CNC operations cheap and more important, simple enough for end users.
 
2012-04-14 05:49:58 PM  

scalpod: Your maker will become dependent on the drugs it can synthesize?

[24.media.tumblr.com image 444x700]


Exactly where my mind went.
 
2012-04-14 06:16:46 PM  
If you haven't, read Venus Equilateral. It's a series of "hard" sci-fi short stories from the 30s and 40s, and they cover "what if we could duplicate any object for free?" and "what would it do to the economy?"

/ also a lot of vacuum tubes
// and electron gun guns, because lasers hadn't been conceived yet
 
2012-04-14 07:05:47 PM  

studebaker hoch: AdrienVeidt

Sure, maybe, sure. The interesting thing about living creatures would be 'turning it on', I'd think. You can't have a properly functioning half-a-cell, so you'd have to assemble it in a ground-energy state then zap it with some electricity to kick into gear. Similarly, you can't have a properly functioning half-an-organism.

Or something.

Living things run on complex chemical reactions and simple electrical circuits, I don't think we need to worry about quantum states. A replicator with electron resolution should be fine.

Could it be used as a transporter? I'm not going first - I would expect any transported person to arrive in incredible pain from having just been disassembled into atoms. No thanks, I'll take the next shuttle down to planet Greenchick.


It's always been my presumption that if you were to teleport startrek style that the end result would be something, that for all intents and purposes, is you, but isn't you... and that when you stepped into the transporter you would essentially be killed. So everytime you transported, you'd die, and an exact replica, down to the atom, would continue on in your place.
 
2012-04-14 07:16:14 PM  
games workshop will go out of business.

its a damn shame i tell ya.
 
2012-04-14 07:16:24 PM  
Fleshlight will go out of business.
 
2012-04-14 07:24:42 PM  
We bought an Objet30 for our university program. It makes beautiful prints - almost indistinguishable from injection molded plastic. The problem is that the resin and support material is proprietary. We can only get it from one source, which means it's crazy expensive.

The machine, however, is the size of a smallish photocopier, and has a decent sized build volume.
 
2012-04-14 07:34:50 PM  
I can has DODS rifle?

/obscure?
 
2012-04-14 07:50:18 PM  
I wonder if we still aren't getting the cart before the horse here tho.
The 3D printers we have now can only use a few materials.

Being a knife collector myself, I wonder if you could ever properly duplicate forged steel or real leather without still involving a level of workmanship. Even if you can shunt molecules into place, can you make them crystallize so the final result is really the same by behavior, touch, and smell?

...And even if it is, can you convince customers that there is no difference?
In a post scarcity world there will be a business in producing real goods for the high class clientele that will still demand them.

Similar to someone who buys a knife now. You can get dozens of cheap Chinese made blades that will suit a task just fine, yet people still pay a premium for ones that are made to a higher standard.
If the only difference in standards becomes a certificate of authenticity that said "some guy slaved over this for a whole day!", I'm tempted to believe people will still pay.
 
2012-04-14 08:24:13 PM  
blah blah blah overdramatization blah blah blah sensationalism blah

we as a society have had almost unlimited access to resources for well over a century such that people can build their own house, repair their own car, maintain everything they own themselves, etc. things that a large portion of the world can only dream of doing

yet we're also extremely capitalistic despite things getting extremely easier to DIY

why? we're lazy, we want convenience, and we would rather spend our time doing fun things - same reason why itunes and steam even exist - most people are too lazy to pirate music and games for free, those who have unlimited free time can and will pirate everything they can but really those kinds of people have existed forever - so what's really going to change with a 3d printer? nothing as far as i can see
 
2012-04-14 08:46:58 PM  

studebaker hoch: AdrienVeidt

Sure, maybe, sure. The interesting thing about living creatures would be 'turning it on', I'd think. You can't have a properly functioning half-a-cell, so you'd have to assemble it in a ground-energy state then zap it with some electricity to kick into gear. Similarly, you can't have a properly functioning half-an-organism.

Or something.

Living things run on complex chemical reactions and simple electrical circuits, I don't think we need to worry about quantum states. A replicator with electron resolution should be fine.

Could it be used as a transporter? I'm not going first - I would expect any transported person to arrive in incredible pain from having just been disassembled into atoms. No thanks, I'll take the next shuttle down to planet Greenchick.


Aren't there some theories about memory being a quantum function, which I think is postulated just because they haven't been able to find where memory is located in the brain?

But still, I don't think you can build a cell from one side to another and have it working while in-progress. You'd probably have to build it all in a frozen state just to keep the plasma from leaking out everywhere while you're still building the cell membrane.

This obviously only applies to biological matter you want to actually work after being built. This stuff should work fine for food, I'd think. Altho, maybe that 'leakage' issue is why everyone biatches about how replicated food tastes weird.
 
2012-04-14 10:01:24 PM  

fluffy2097: t3knomanser: BigSlowTarget: Gun control becomes a total joke.

It already largely is. Most of the major parts of a firearm can be constructed in a cheap garage machine shop. Constructing a barrel that will last through repeated firings is the hard part.

I don't even think that's hard if you know a bit about materials sciences and the composition of barrels. Chances are if you have a lathe capable of making a rifled barrel, you probably have the skills to know what metal to make a barrel from.

/Some kind of high strength steel if the TV serves me right
//Gunpowder is a low speed explosive, so it pushes the bullet out rather then blowing the barrel up.
///It's impossible to control weapons when things like ammonium and bleach lay around every house as cleaning agents. A lot of house hold things can be quite lethal if combined right.
////Macguyver only for good!


Usually 4140, which is middling in terms of strength. You actually want an elastic steel in comparison to what people expect to see. The barrel actually has to expand and flex to accompany the movement of the barrel against the lands, and for farks sake do NOT harden the metal, that's how you get SCLIDs.

The problem with modern gun barrels is that they're designed to handle modern loads, which require a lot of parameters to be exact in order to prevent pressure spikes. An average garage based machinist might be able to handle a shotgun barrel, but a rifle or pistol barrel made in a home shop is likely to explode unless made for black powder and some of the earlier (.38 smokeless) loads.

/Gunsmith
//Toolmaker machinist
///ME student
 
2012-04-14 10:14:08 PM  
so we can all build our own guns?
 
2012-04-14 10:27:34 PM  
When the machines replace people, the people get cheaper goods... but then you have a ton more people looking for jobs that just aren't there.

If there were some magical replicator that could create anything from nothing... people like to fantisize that this means everyone gets everything for free and everyone is happy. In reality, most people would live in destitute horror with no way to make an income while an elite few would have all the luxuries they would want. There'd be nothing but a service industry, if you were lucky enough to get a job at all.
 
2012-04-14 11:15:17 PM  

Talon: In reality, most people would live in destitute horror with no way to make an income while an elite few would have all the luxuries they would want.


Exactly like when mechanization came in. The economy was completely and utterly destroyed, and those people who lost their jobs- they lost them forever. No one saw a supply of cheap labor and a way to profit off it. They just died. Poor.

Wait, that didn't happen at all.
 
2012-04-15 12:02:00 AM  

t3knomanser: Talon: In reality, most people would live in destitute horror with no way to make an income while an elite few would have all the luxuries they would want.

Exactly like when mechanization came in. The economy was completely and utterly destroyed, and those people who lost their jobs- they lost them forever. No one saw a supply of cheap labor and a way to profit off it. They just died. Poor.

Wait, that didn't happen at all.


Indeed, because the one thing we can never invent is "free".
Even if you can get the machinery at no cost, and the energy to run it, and the resources to feed into it, and the licenses for all the patterns you need, there will probably still be a tax to pay (which means bureaucratic jobs).

We will be losing even more manufacturing jobs than we did before, which could become a problem of its own.

/Altho I still think that human nature will drive people to lust after non-replicated items.
/Maybe that new money will force a return to the old values of craftsmanship.
 
2012-04-15 12:04:07 AM  

t3knomanser: Talon: In reality, most people would live in destitute horror with no way to make an income while an elite few would have all the luxuries they would want.

Exactly like when mechanization came in. The economy was completely and utterly destroyed, and those people who lost their jobs- they lost them forever. No one saw a supply of cheap labor and a way to profit off it. They just died. Poor.

Wait, that didn't happen at all.


Yeah cheap labor. I'm sure their quality of life was just great when there were far more laborers than available jobs.

Not saying this technology shouldn't be sought... but that people are wrong to think life's going to be some grand utopia instead of exactly like our current service-economy made worse.
 
2012-04-15 12:21:55 AM  
The same thing that happened to the printing and publishing industries when 2d printers were in every home.

Prices came down, big companies who existed on a business model based only on over pricing disappeared and people now have an choice, print at home for alittle more or at a store for a small saving.

No these wont kill large scale manufacturing any more than an HP killed book publishing, some things are just cheaper to do on a mass scale by minorities
 
2012-04-15 02:02:13 AM  

fluffy2097:

I don't even think that's hard if you know a bit about materials sciences and the composition of barrels. Chances are if you have a lathe capable of making a rifled barrel, you probably have the skills to know what metal to make a barrel from.


As I understand it, the equipment to properly do rifled barrels is not easily come by, and it's one of the things for which there really aren't any plans, or good descriptions of. The way I heard it, it's simply an extremely well kept trade secret, which is (part of) why high quality rifles are so expensive.

Almost all of the underground-built firearms built during the unpleasantness in the 40s were not rifled. But then, given what they were meant for, that was acceptable.

Speaking of which. It looks like the way the laws are written, possessing both the knowledge and the machinery to produce certain firearms means that, legally, you already have them. So having a MakerBot 9000 (it's better than the MakerBot 6000) and FullAutoMac11.zip means that you'd be in a world of shiat, even if you never actually made one.
 
2012-04-15 02:30:18 AM  
Most people end up starving because they don't have jobs making stuff that allows them to pay for food?

I really don't think any farmer is going to hand over food because you offer to customize his Ubuntu installation.
 
2012-04-15 03:35:27 AM  

narkor: Most people end up starving because they don't have jobs making stuff that allows them to pay for food?

I really don't think any farmer is going to hand over food because you offer to customize his Ubuntu installation.


The vast majority of people in developed nations don't have manufacturing jobs now. And your farmer, if he is anything like the average household, already spends the bulk of his income on other things. If Ubuntu customization and farming were the only careers other than manufacturing, most people would already be starving.
 
2012-04-15 03:44:51 AM  
Everyone will download a car.
 
2012-04-15 09:26:18 AM  

Talon: but that people are wrong to think life's going to be some grand utopia instead of exactly like our current service-economy made worse.


I would expect it to be significantly better, in the same way computers and cellphones made our lives better. Anything that empowers the average citizens to take control of the world around them is a good thing.

way south: Even if you can get the machinery at no cost, and the energy to run it, and the resources to feed into it, and the licenses for all the patterns you need, there will probably still be a tax to pay


And let's not forget that someone has to make those patterns. Even if the patterns can be easily pirated, what we've learned from piracy is that no matter how easy it is, most people aren't going to pirate. There will be open source patterns, but once again- we already know that not everyone just switches to open source stuff because it's there. They like the proprietary options for various reasons.
 
2012-04-15 10:01:00 AM  
Manufacuting is the second biggest sector in the US economy, accounting for around 15% of full time employees. The nerd fantasy is that everyone gets a replicator and shares their open source designs and no one has to pay for stuff.. The reality is that tens of millions more people become unemployed. But Nerd Contempt for manufacturing jobs (nerds certainly didn't give a shiat about manufacturing jobs going overseas, it was only when the IT jobs started going overseas that suddenly it was a bad idea) blinds you to the reality of what a replicator economy would do. And given nerd contempt for intellectual property, it ain't as though you are going to be able to build a new economy on the exchange of ideas for money (you can't have an information economy if information wants to be free).
 
2012-04-15 10:54:04 AM  

narkor: Manufacuting is the second biggest sector in the US economy, accounting for around 15% of full time employees. The nerd fantasy is that everyone gets a replicator and shares their open source designs and no one has to pay for stuff.. The reality is that tens of millions more people become unemployed. But Nerd Contempt for manufacturing jobs (nerds certainly didn't give a shiat about manufacturing jobs going overseas, it was only when the IT jobs started going overseas that suddenly it was a bad idea) blinds you to the reality of what a replicator economy would do. And given nerd contempt for intellectual property, it ain't as though you are going to be able to build a new economy on the exchange of ideas for money (you can't have an information economy if information wants to be free).


cdn2.holytaco.com
 
2012-04-15 11:03:29 AM  

Skyfrog: Everyone will download a car.


I will download a Bear.
 
2012-04-15 11:28:45 AM  
I hope the replicator makes SOCIALISM!
 
2012-04-15 12:44:08 PM  

dervish16108: I hope the replicator makes SOCIALISM!


dl.dropbox.com
 
2012-04-15 02:08:49 PM  

Mister Peejay: fluffy2097:

I don't even think that's hard if you know a bit about materials sciences and the composition of barrels. Chances are if you have a lathe capable of making a rifled barrel, you probably have the skills to know what metal to make a barrel from.

As I understand it, the equipment to properly do rifled barrels is not easily come by, and it's one of the things for which there really aren't any plans, or good descriptions of. The way I heard it, it's simply an extremely well kept trade secret, which is (part of) why high quality rifles are so expensive.

Almost all of the underground-built firearms built during the unpleasantness in the 40s were not rifled. But then, given what they were meant for, that was acceptable.

Speaking of which. It looks like the way the laws are written, possessing both the knowledge and the machinery to produce certain firearms means that, legally, you already have them. So having a MakerBot 9000 (it's better than the MakerBot 6000) and FullAutoMac11.zip means that you'd be in a world of shiat, even if you never actually made one.


Harold Hoffman
 
2012-04-15 02:19:40 PM  

t3knomanser: I would expect it to be significantly better, in the same way computers and cellphones made our lives better. Anything that empowers the average citizens to take control of the world around them is a good thing


You presume that the average person will have this technology and that it won't remain in the hands of an elite few.
 
2012-04-15 02:39:31 PM  

Talon: You presume that the average person will have this technology and that it won't remain in the hands of an elite few


The technology is already in the hands of an elite few. The next advance is going to be democratizing it.
 
2012-04-15 05:22:40 PM  
Will this mean I finally get my Flying Car?
 
2012-04-15 05:32:11 PM  
AdrienVeidt

Aren't there some theories about memory being a quantum function, which I think is postulated just because they haven't been able to find where memory is located in the brain?

But still, I don't think you can build a cell from one side to another and have it working while in-progress. You'd probably have to build it all in a frozen state just to keep the plasma from leaking out everywhere while you're still building the cell membrane.

This obviously only applies to biological matter you want to actually work after being built. This stuff should work fine for food, I'd think. Altho, maybe that 'leakage' issue is why everyone biatches about how replicated food tastes weird.


Good point - how do you get an atom to hold still while you assemble the nucleus and put all the electrons in the correct orbits?

Build them at absolute zero? OK now lessee here, we need a half-dozen neutrons right there, couple protons there and there and two more here, got it...OK now I have to put all these electrons in the right orbits, god dammit they keep getting away, how do you make a carbon again?

And then I guess you thaw it out and and yell "GO!" and it's an atom? And then how many more do you have to build?

Gene Roddenberry thought up the transporters because shuttle launch and recovery cycles would take too long and he wanted Kirk, Spock, McCoy and Pvt. Redshirt down to the planet before viewers could walk to the TV and switch to Gilligans Island.
 
2012-04-15 05:43:17 PM  

studebaker hoch: AdrienVeidt

Pvt. Redshirt . . . . .


Went looking for an image of Pvt. Redshirt, you'll never guess . . . I'd better just show you:

supportyourlocalgunfighter.com
 
2012-04-15 07:23:32 PM  
Trolljegeren

Your five-year mission: "To boldly go where no man has gone before."
 
2012-04-15 08:33:48 PM  

narkor: Manufacuting is the second biggest sector in the US economy, accounting for around 15% of full time employees. The nerd fantasy is that everyone gets a replicator and shares their open source designs and no one has to pay for stuff.. The reality is that tens of millions more people become unemployed. But Nerd Contempt for manufacturing jobs (nerds certainly didn't give a shiat about manufacturing jobs going overseas, it was only when the IT jobs started going overseas that suddenly it was a bad idea) blinds you to the reality of what a replicator economy would do. And given nerd contempt for intellectual property, it ain't as though you are going to be able to build a new economy on the exchange of ideas for money (you can't have an information economy if information wants to be free).


You're the one having a full-on nerd fantasy if you think that any remotely realistic replicator would actually eliminate all manufacturing jobs. Also if you think it would fail to generate its own set of jobs, or fail to spark a boom in other industries, or suddenly make information free.

///incidentally it's 15% of private sector jobs, not total
 
Displayed 50 of 108 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report