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(Mental Floss)   Nineteen regional US slang words to work into your vocabulary. Some of these are kinda buffleheaded, a couple are pretty whoopensocker   (mentalfloss.com) divider line 297
    More: Interesting, United States, Upper Midwest, Wisconsinites, verbs, Dickensian, Noah's Ark, Nantucket, Appalachians  
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23339 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 Apr 2012 at 3:27 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-04-14 09:47:55 AM
List fails without "devil strip".

www.dnr.state.oh.us

What a devil strip might look like.
 
2012-04-14 09:49:34 AM

ArmanTanzarian: I'm fixin to tump your coke over.

\Savages


Just pour out the neck for me, it's damn near kickoff.
 
2012-04-14 09:50:11 AM

Pants full of macaroni!!: List fails without "devil strip".

[www.dnr.state.oh.us image 270x183]

What a devil strip might look like.


www.mpi.mb.ca


The chicken lane
 
2012-04-14 09:53:37 AM
Haggleblass
 
2012-04-14 09:56:18 AM
In central PA, we used to say "boot" instead of vomit.

Also, "lightening" is what happens at dawn, not the accompaniment to thunder.
 
2012-04-14 10:01:20 AM
Being from Pennsylvania, I was roughly eighteen years old before I learned that mangos grew on mango trees, and weren't green bell peppers.
 
2012-04-14 10:05:37 AM

One Bad Apple: Pants full of macaroni!!: List fails without "devil strip".

[www.dnr.state.oh.us image 270x183]

What a devil strip might look like.

[www.mpi.mb.ca image 217x434]


The chicken lane


I always called that the suicide lane.
 
2012-04-14 10:06:16 AM

Rising_Zan_Samurai_Gunman: Nina Haagen Dazs: I have yet to hear a Wisconsinite say whoopensocker. If they do, I'd bet they live near the Iowa border.

^This

I've lived in Wisconsin 32 years and have never heard "whoopensocker" or "wapatuli".
Whoopensocker actually sounds like it would come from the UP of Michigan, or one of the more Norwegian areas of MN (like in the movie "Fargo")


Or "The Golden Girls" writing room.
 
2012-04-14 10:12:16 AM

thamike: Unless they're talking about the dialect of spooky Appalachian hill wizards, their Virginia entries are horsesh*t.


I'm fluent in the dialect of spooky Appalachian hill wizards, and I think those entries are carn as well.
 
2012-04-14 10:18:38 AM
12. chinchy (adj.), South, South Midlands

It's spelled "chintzy". The word comes from "chintz", a type of cheap, brightly colored cloth. Chintzy doesn't mean just cheap--it means cheap and gaudy at the same time.
 
2012-04-14 10:19:44 AM
Jungle Juice?
Wapatuli?

No sir.

Donkey Punch!

Well, because it resembles actual punch, it makes your head hurt and quite often tears up your guts.

And for a more family/prude friendly name, or a more vile mixture(hey, sometimes it happens) that the resulting feeling as having suffered blunt trauma to the cranium..

Mean Hoof!

Heard someone call it "garbage" not long back, because you do it in a very large container like a garbage can. That's a bit mundane.
 
2012-04-14 10:30:55 AM

Mouser: 12. chinchy (adj.), South, South Midlands

It's spelled "chintzy". The word comes from "chintz", a type of cheap, brightly colored cloth. Chintzy doesn't mean just cheap--it means cheap and gaudy at the same time.


And it's a national term now.

My correction:
15. burk (v.), Georgia, South
More fun than the word "vomit" and more polite than the word "fart," this utilitarian verb describes both activities. Just be happy that if you're in West Virginia, you don't get the skitters-an Appalachian version of Montezuma's revenge.

Nothing is more fun than the word Vomit. You can drag it out to sound like vomit in the process, and it is a part of Vurp.

Also
The more polite way to say fart is "shiat my pants".
Seriously though, you just say "gas" when being polite or formal, not slang
Fart is for kids.
 
2012-04-14 10:35:47 AM
The word that I use that drives my wife crazy: Yous

Plural for you. A more redneck word than ya'll.
 
2012-04-14 10:42:53 AM
Am I the only one that differentiates a wedgie (back) from a snuggie (front)
 
2012-04-14 10:44:40 AM

soldier_of_orange: I live in Virginia and commute to NoVa. "Slug" is most definitely a legit inclusion. I often pick up slugs in a pinch when I'm not driving up in my normal carpool. There's slug etiquette even.


I also knew slug. However, I think it used to be more common several years back, and if you weren't commuting between VA & DC areas, there would be no reason to know it. I have relatives who used to go to slug lots each morning for rides, but anyone who didn't commute didn't usually recognize the word.
 
2012-04-14 10:53:04 AM

Equilibrist: That list is 'wicked pissah' (Massachusetts). Disagree? Well. 'If you're feeling froggy: leap', (West virginia)


Oh, for FARK'S sake! I've lived in Massachusetts all my life and I have never, NEVER heard anyone utter the phrase "wicked pissah"... no one that I know, no one that any of my friends know, and no one that any of my local ONLINE friends know. Maybe it's said in a few districts in the Boston area (I have no proof of that, though), but as a general, popular "Massachusetts" term, it doesn't exist... and I wish people would stop propagating that rumour.

/Yeah, yeah, "Welcome to Fark" and all that.
 
2012-04-14 10:53:50 AM
After Wisconsin high school and college I am amazed the nation has not heard of wapatuli.

Wisconsin out drinking your states since 1848!
 
2012-04-14 10:55:07 AM

EvilEgg: Been in CT for 10 years never heard the word jasm.


Read that definition -- it sounds like something I'd be injecting into a woman.

/just sayin' . . .

//and it's rotgut; English, motherfarker, do you speak it?
 
2012-04-14 10:55:47 AM
I've lived in Kentucky long enough and have never heard anyone utter the words associated with the state in that article.

In fact, we made a drink in a large jar with tequila and citrus fruit and some other things called wapatuli...never "splo" or whatever the hell it was.
 
2012-04-14 11:00:35 AM
Ok. So for the DC/MD/VA area ones let's clear some things up. "Slugging" has been around for decades, both the act and the word itself.

Also, "jabble" isn't "jabble". It's "jarble". And its "special definition" is based on its real definition. "Jarble" and "Messed" are synonymous to some degree. So if you replace the word "messed" with "jarbled" in your normal vernacular, you get phrases like... "That's all jarbled up", instead of "That's all messed up".

I've heard and used jarbled in this manner, but never "jabble". Although... there's only a handful of sources online that indicate the definition for jarble.
 
2012-04-14 11:00:57 AM

Pants full of macaroni!!: List fails without "devil strip".

[www.dnr.state.oh.us image 270x183]

What a devil strip might look like.


Everyone has it wrong. The grass strip between a sidewalk and a road is is a boulevard. (Not to be confused with the grass strip between lanes going in opposite directions which is a strip)


Speaking of roads, is the term "Fog line" common outside of the Wisconsin-Illinois area?
 
2012-04-14 11:01:45 AM

PunkTiger: and I wish people would stop propagating that rumour.


You're retahded and your shiat's all farkded up.
 
2012-04-14 11:02:18 AM
my dad has always referred to any gunk or build-up on an object as "skomokus". (best spelling I've come up with)

has anyone else heard anything like this? or are we crazy?

/from Ohio, if that helps
 
2012-04-14 11:03:08 AM

Broktun: The word that I use that drives my wife crazy: Yous

Plural for you. A more redneck word than ya'll.


All yinz don' tak rat.
 
2012-04-14 11:03:33 AM

vudukungfu: Nogale: Is this where Farkers from the places on this list say they've NEVER heard any of these words?

domo_kun_sai: I've lived in Wisconsin for 18 years and have never heard anyone say these words.
So, the list is a lie.

debug: I've lived in PA, VA and DC and have not heard one of those words before in my entire life.

Jilaad: I've lived in Virginia for 33 years and haven't heard a single one of these.

They do if they live in spendy neighborhoods.


Now see, here's the thing. When I lived in Michigan, we called expensive things "pricey". As far as I ever heard, it was the same in California, though I didn't live there long. I move to Oregon, and everyone says "spendy". I can say "pricey" in Oregon and people get what I mean, but if I used "spendy" in Michigan, people would ask me what I meant. And also look at me funny.

I think "spendy" sounds vaguely dirty.
 
2012-04-14 11:07:55 AM
Have heard larrup and burk both, but not often.

More likely (still rare) to hear yark instead of burk.

They missed a few, guess they didn't do the Appalachian thing, I use these a lot:

gaumin' : screwing off, generally as part of the phrase "Messin' and gaumin' around", also a person who is either an idiot or a farkoff as in "that boy is gaum-struck"

afling: something insignificant, small or leftover: "Nothing left of it but the aflings"

"bow up": really surprised me when I discovered this one wasn't universal the other day - to posture in such a way as to demonstrate impending aggression "I think I'm going to bow up if they ask me for that damn TPS report again", I had to explain "to bow up" in depth the other day at a customer site, no one had ever heard it.
 
2012-04-14 11:09:46 AM
Carbonated beverages should be called what they are: A coke is a coke, a sprite is a sprite, and a beverage of indeterminate flavor is a Dr. Pepper.

No matter what generic adjective you prefer, if you ask for a 'coke' and really want a Mt. Dew, I don't care what part of the country you are from. You are wrong.
 
2012-04-14 11:15:23 AM

Knockers: After Wisconsin high school and college I am amazed the nation has not heard of wapatuli.

Wisconsin out drinking your states since 1848!


That's because you're not counting lighter fluid, anti-freeze, and Kentucky.

nomeatballs.files.wordpress.com

YOU BLOODY FOOL! YOU SHOULD NEVER MIX YOUR DRINKS!
 
2012-04-14 11:20:07 AM

phoolishone: I think "spendy" sounds vaguely dirty.


Spendy is "above budget" Could be a great bargain, but still too spendy.
Pricey is "over priced"
1. Status items
2. Gas is getting pricey
*note something can be over priced and out of budget

Cheap and Chintzy have become interchangable any more, used to be:
Cheap "good value" or "low cost"
Chintzy "low price, but also low quality"(cheap shiat that falls apart, or otherwise is contrary to the item's purported use.)(IE Gaudy is contrary to good fashion)

IMO anyhow.
 
2012-04-14 11:27:04 AM
Jawn - n - philadelphia - "joint" as in place or thing. "Yeah, I bin up that jawn; it be rockin' come tree, tree thirty. Catch the el, norf Broad."
 
2012-04-14 11:28:21 AM
Around here people go to garage sales. I understand that in other parts of the country people miss out because they go to rummage sales, yard sales, tag sales and (in the UK) jumble sales
 
2012-04-14 11:28:32 AM
26.media.tumblr.com
 
2012-04-14 11:29:12 AM

EvilEgg: Been in CT for 10 years never heard the word jasm.


20 years, and nope, me either.
 
2012-04-14 11:29:47 AM
This article is hella east coast biased
 
2012-04-14 11:29:58 AM

catmandu: garage sales. I understand that in other parts of the country people miss out because they go to rummage sales, yard sales


Used all these, never heard of a tag sale, or a jumble sale(must be slobs over there).
 
2012-04-14 11:30:01 AM

catmandu: Around here people go to garage sales. I understand that in other parts of the country people miss out because they go to rummage sales, yard sales, tag sales and (in the UK) jumble sales


"Estate sale" is another one, which sounds just as repellent in the suburban US as it does in the UK, but for different reasons.
 
2012-04-14 11:36:02 AM
The old lady saw the last post and is informing me of an endless stream of Tom-isms she's noted over the years, who is she to talk, she's British.

Ok - here's a few of her no-doubt incorrect observations:

A tendency to add an extra "es" to verbs that end in "st", sometimes to nouns, sometimes twice if it's plural, mostly if I'm making fun of myself: rusts->rust-es, lasts-> last-es (or worse, last-eses) "It lasteses a long time" or "She's shore got some big breasteses" esp if I'm drunk and really doing the north Georgia twang for effect. But sometimes it happens unbidden. She says.

ruin->rurn, ruined -> rurnt

sandwich -> sammitch. I swear I don't do this but she says I can't say the word properly.

road -> ro-id, two syllables.

teeth -> teefus (I used to do this for effect, now it's a habit)

using "that" for "who" - "She's the lady that teaches 5th grade over to the school", another thing she says I never get right

favor: To resemble. I don't see the problem here but she says it's poor grammar to say "He favors his daddy"

quietus: to kill "He put the quietus to his old dog yesterday"

"rode hard and put away wet": disheveled, slovenly, exhausted, unattractive. "She'd be more attractive if she wasn't rode hard and put away wet"
 
2012-04-14 11:37:16 AM
As someone who grew up in Connecticut, "jasm" is not a Connecticut word. As far as I know, that word has never even been uttered in CT.
 
2012-04-14 11:41:38 AM

tirob: "Burk" for "throw up" in the south?

In French, "beurk" (pronounced "burk," more or less) is the onomatopoeic sound you make to describe someone throwing up. Cajun influence here, maybe?

although I guess some of you in the South say "spit up" rather than "throw up."

/beurk


I've always understood it as infants spit up, but past a certain age they just throw up.
 
2012-04-14 11:43:50 AM

erewhon:
using "that" for "who" - "She's the lady that teaches 5th grade over to the school", another thing she says I never get right




Tell her its "whom."
 
2012-04-14 11:48:38 AM
Nobody uses those words.
 
2012-04-14 11:51:44 AM

Karls Marxley's Rise Up and Jam: 20. Yarrrr'd (?), Baltimore
General exclamation, call to attention, greeting, or who the f*ck knows, really

[i.imgur.com image 506x316]

/it's all in the game


This post made entering this thread worthwhile.
 
2012-04-14 11:58:19 AM

chaddsfarkprefect: erewhon:
using "that" for "who" - "She's the lady that teaches 5th grade over to the school", another thing she says I never get right

Tell her its "whom."


Wow, a "twofer"!

/notsureifserious
 
2012-04-14 11:59:40 AM
Here is an extremely narrow slang term that maybe only 75 people have ever used : "Flictic" a poorly pronounced afflicted. It originated from a San Diego public access cable faith healing show.

Imagine the "SKRIMPS" woman in a grey wig pretending (poorly) to be an 80 year old grandmother. Next to her on stage is some hunched up Urkle looking kid with those wrap around/pistol grip aluminum crutches. She pleads with the Reverend to heal him. Verbatim she says "Please hep this child. He has multiple scoliosis, cystic mitosis, and even halitosis he just be all kinds of..of... 'flictic" at which point myself and 4 others watching this fell off the couch howling until our faces cramped up.


Flictic then became the word for a piece of equipment or situation that had multiple fatal flaws flaws. It became a replacement for FUBAR
 
2012-04-14 12:22:40 PM

doglover: Yinz jags!

It ain't "snoopy" it's nebby!

"Don be nebby n'at."



Yer better red up the house by using the sweeper (but look out for gum bands) before we head out for an imp and arn.
 
2012-04-14 12:30:28 PM

BigChad: doglover: Yinz jags!

It ain't "snoopy" it's nebby!

"Don be nebby n'at."


Yer better red up the house by using the sweeper (but look out for gum bands) before we head out for an imp and arn.


"Red up"! - finally, one I've heard IRL. wow. and yesterday was 14 years since my grandpa, that always said that, passed away.

Imp and arn I have no clue about, but red up is one I've been meaning to start using!
 
2012-04-14 12:34:00 PM

feanorn: We drank whop in Minnesota --- the recipe was fiendish at my college, as the alcohol was entirely hidden behind the mix.

Also, a useful word I grew up with was "boughten", as in "boughten bread", distinguishing it from homemade.


My grandmother, who grew up in eastern Washington and northern Idaho, uses "boughten."

Also, I remember hearing "snirt" in Alaska in the 70s. Every spring there was much cleaning up of snirt.
 
2012-04-14 12:38:52 PM

Gough:
Wow, a "twofer"!


The problem with this one is, I literally cannot hear myself do it. I can purge most Appalachianisms from my speech on demand - I'm not likely to append a spare "es" , say "up air", "ain't" or hum in "he's got a lavish plenty of" unintentionally but I just can't quit saying "that" for "who".
 
2012-04-14 12:50:03 PM
i'm so gobsmacked reading this list
 
2012-04-14 12:51:09 PM

doglover: Yinz jags!

It ain't "snoopy" it's nebby!

"Don be nebby n'at."


Nebby dahn't mean the same as snoopy. Nebby is when yinz is askin' too many questions baht stuff yinz dahn need ta know. Or just being a jerk, ja nebshiat!

\I really miss the Pittsburghese sometimes...
 
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