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(Mental Floss)   Nineteen regional US slang words to work into your vocabulary. Some of these are kinda buffleheaded, a couple are pretty whoopensocker   (mentalfloss.com ) divider line
    More: Interesting, United States, Upper Midwest, Wisconsinites, verbs, Dickensian, Noah's Ark, Nantucket, Appalachians  
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23381 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 Apr 2012 at 3:27 AM (4 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-04-14 04:33:01 AM  
Never heard of ratgut. I have heard of rotgut.
 
2012-04-14 04:44:19 AM  
Chicken-bread, river-cricket, twizzler or haole. No matter where you hail from, know when you're being called a cracker.
 
2012-04-14 04:44:32 AM  

EvilEgg: propasaurus: doglover: SilentStrider: Its soda. Calling it soda or sodapop should be illegal.

It's pop.

It's coke.

It's tonic.


I am currently consuming a soft drink.
 
2012-04-14 04:46:52 AM  
i havent heard anyone say mug up. I have, however, been called a gussuk (white man, peninsula native) cutchkuk (white man, koniag, yupik native) and alupbuk (black man, koniah, yupik native)
 
2012-04-14 04:49:04 AM  

Twitch Boy: I've actually made wapatuli at college in the UP of Michigan. We just called it wop. We had a party during Winter Carnival every year with a 55 gallon barrel of the stuff with real fruit.

My friend once got a very interesting phone call from Wells Fargo fraud prevention after purchasing the required 30 handles of Everclear.

/I went to a drinking school with an engineering problem


I never heard that name. I always knew it as "jungle juice".
 
2012-04-14 04:56:10 AM  

lewismarktwo: Although, non-sarcastic usage of 'hella' is strictly prohibited.


No one is using 'hella' sarcastically in California, unless they are some kind of douche that wants to ruin the fun. I assume the same goes for 'wicked' in New England. As a native Texan that considers myself now a Californian as well, I do understand that using those words makes you sound pretty stupid anywhere else. 'Y'all' works anywhere though, the only ones who mock it are pseudo-intellectual and pretentious types, I've found.

/forced myself to not say 'hella' when I moved here but it couldn't be stopped
//started saying 'mad' recently as a replacement, props to NYC!
 
2012-04-14 05:02:22 AM  

LaughingRadish: Twitch Boy: I've actually made wapatuli at college in the UP of Michigan. We just called it wop. We had a party during Winter Carnival every year with a 55 gallon barrel of the stuff with real fruit.

My friend once got a very interesting phone call from Wells Fargo fraud prevention after purchasing the required 30 handles of Everclear.

/I went to a drinking school with an engineering problem

I never heard that name. I always knew it as "jungle juice".


we used to call it purple jesus - mainly cause we always used grape juice in it and there was sooooo much everclear you thought you were seeing him.
 
2012-04-14 05:02:53 AM  
I submit 'skookum'. Was used for damn fine, damn good, or strong where I grew up.

Q: How do you be?
A: Skookum

Another was "Clean", but not used how I see it used on the rest of the planet.
Q: How do I look?
A: Clean
Q: WTF does that mean? Do I normally smell?
A: No, I noticed you got a haircut and you ironed the crap you're wearing.

I've since been able to reduce the PNW markers from my regular language. After 40 years I've almost been able to substitute "sure" for "you bet".

I've also stopped using 'do' as much. As an example, instead of "You want to do you some eats?" is now "would you like to get a bite to eat?"

It caused me untold hell when I escaped from the forest and entered the business world.
 
2012-04-14 05:08:31 AM  
Having grown up in Southern Wisconsin during my childhood, the only regional terms I recall were:

soda (we were emphatically NOT a pop area);

FIBS: f--kin Illinois bastards (usually Chicago folks);

bubbler: water fountain;

sunday clothes: anything suit and tie - I lived in a blue collar and farming area;

kicker: kick ball

Hmm, there must be other terms I forgot...
 
2012-04-14 05:17:53 AM  
You're all buffleheaded.
 
2012-04-14 05:20:59 AM  

lohphat: EvilEgg: propasaurus: doglover: SilentStrider: Its soda. Calling it soda or sodapop should be illegal.

It's pop.

It's coke.

It's tonic.

It's fatassening.


it's diabeetus
 
2012-04-14 05:35:11 AM  
This list is the bees' knees.
 
2012-04-14 05:36:17 AM  
Pretty sure the word snert exists in any state or region that has 1.snow 2.dirt. More so if they have those two plus wind and/or snowplows.

\y'all exist because English doesn't have a proper second person plural.
\\always liked "all y'all" as a second person inclusive though.
 
2012-04-14 05:42:38 AM  
I've lived in PA, VA and DC and have not heard one of those words before in my entire life.
 
2012-04-14 05:52:10 AM  
No slang from the west on the list at all? List is hella stupid.
 
2012-04-14 05:55:37 AM  

EvilEgg: Been in CT for 10 years never heard the word jasm.


Nineinchnosehair:
??? No ???
I was born here; maybe I don't hang around enough 90 year old men who think they're the cat's pajamas or something???


This and this. Was born and raised in CT, this is the first time I've heard it...?!
 
2012-04-14 06:05:47 AM  

batcookie: So wait... the present participle of Georgia's word for vomiting is the same as smothering someone with a pillow? That could make for some awkard confusion...


Never heard of anyone use this word in Ga, and I have heard quite a few unusual words. The sound of vomiting is ellk.
 
2012-04-14 06:06:32 AM  

rev. dave: batcookie: So wait... the present participle of Georgia's word for vomiting is the same as smothering someone with a pillow? That could make for some awkard confusion...

Never heard of anyone use this word in Ga, and I have heard quite a few unusual words. The sound of vomiting is ellk.


And I made that up based on how I think it sounds.
 
2012-04-14 06:13:52 AM  

rev. dave: batcookie: So wait... the present participle of Georgia's word for vomiting is the same as smothering someone with a pillow? That could make for some awkard confusion...

Never heard of anyone use this word in Ga, and I have heard quite a few unusual words. The sound of vomiting is ellk.


Well I don't know about the accuracy of the article, but "to burke" means to smother someone (after William Burke, half of the infamous serial killer duo Burke & Hare), so assuming the article is correct in that some people from Ga say "burk" instead of vomit, even though the infinitives are subtly different, the present participles would both be burking. It could lead to some very bad misunderstandings....
 
2012-04-14 06:25:46 AM  
"arky" ...assuming this is actually used, I doubt it actually derives from "Noah's Ark" rather than "archaic"

"skitters" ...any standard English word describing rapid movement like "runs" or "trots" or "skitteres" seems a pretty unremarkable euphemism for diarrhea

"ratgut" ...is misspelling "rotgut" really a regional thing?
 
2012-04-14 06:26:50 AM  
/"skitters" not "skitteres" of course
 
2012-04-14 06:35:50 AM  

Nina Haagen Dazs: I have yet to hear a Wisconsinite say whoopensocker. If they do, I'd bet they live near the Iowa border.


As someone who grew up and spends much time on Wisconsin's Iowa border, I assure you we are a backwards people who in fact do not say "whoopensocker." You will notice that it exceeds our typical vocabulary by two syllables.

Also, for the record, it's called wop not wapatuli. It's based on the word pop. If made well, it can be tolerable. When you go through a lot of alcohol, it's reasonable to save the ends of bottles for this concoction.
 
2012-04-14 06:39:04 AM  
Maritimes: "Fill yer' boots." Meaning, 'do [whatever] with enthusiasm.'
 
2012-04-14 06:42:23 AM  
beemsch! beats tea made from pac-em-out-billies
 
2012-04-14 06:42:47 AM  
I decided that "go for it" is a more accurate translation of "fill yer boots." Anyone else out there who can be more precise? Also, as a CFA Maritimer, I realize that it might be more regional than I think. Maybe NFLD origin?
 
2012-04-14 06:45:06 AM  
It's brick as shiat outside, deadass.

/nobody understands me
 
2012-04-14 06:46:25 AM  

ImmaHoopyFrood: I submit 'skookum'. Was used for damn fine, damn good, or strong where I grew up.


Wasn't "skookum" the name of a troll who kept a list of liberals on Fark who were supposedly going to be locked up in reeducation camps?

/I wanted to be on that list.
 
2012-04-14 06:52:39 AM  
Suprised they didn't have "steamed hams" listed.

/ from upstate New York
 
2012-04-14 06:55:46 AM  

puffy999: Does anyone notice how none of those words come from the western states in the continental US?

It's because we're not retarded.


No, it's because you have no culture.
 
2012-04-14 06:56:49 AM  
Rising_Zan_Samurai_Gunman
Nina Haagen Dazs: I have yet to hear a Wisconsinite say whoopensocker. If they do, I'd bet they live near the Iowa border.

^This

I've lived in Wisconsin 32 years and have never heard "whoopensocker" or "wapatuli".
Whoopensocker actually sounds like it would come from the UP of Michigan, or one of the more Norwegian areas of MN (like in the movie "Fargo")


My grandfather (1st generation Dutch immigrant) used to call his Brandy's his whoopensocker. My parent also used to tell stories of their "wapatuli" too. I've never seen either of these in writing and always thought it was my crazy family.
 
2012-04-14 07:04:18 AM  
that article was seven-thirty, son
 
2012-04-14 07:09:55 AM  
Whompensocker.

Yawkenstretcher.
 
2012-04-14 07:15:07 AM  
I've always been fond of regional sayings.

Especially on an icy morning. 'Slick as snot on a china doorknob.'
 
2012-04-14 07:17:09 AM  

EvilEgg: propasaurus: doglover: SilentStrider: Its soda. Calling it soda or sodapop should be illegal.

It's pop.

It's coke.

It's tonic.


Link (new window). SFW LINK pop vs soda map
 
2012-04-14 07:25:05 AM  

puffy999: Does anyone notice how none of those words come from the western states in the continental US?

It's because we're not retarded.


boontling (new window)
 
2012-04-14 07:30:09 AM  
images1.wikia.nocookie.net

Yer all buffleheaded.

/ Hot
 
2012-04-14 07:45:44 AM  

bingethinker: Never heard of ratgut. I have heard of rotgut.

while in the mid-Atlantic, whiskey-especially the moonshine variety-is ratgut.

Read the full text here: http://www.mentalfloss.com/blogs/archives/122638#ixzz1s0wz28jq
--brought to you by mental_floss!


Try it now with a joisey or new yoik accent.
TFAuthor may be good with word, but he can't pick apart and accent.
 
2012-04-14 07:46:48 AM  
He's probably a nebby jag-off.
 
2012-04-14 07:48:09 AM  

TheJoe03: Where the hell is hella? Most people under 50 say that word at least once in a while if they are from NorCal. I guess this list had nothing to do with slang terms people actually say.


Vocal contration of "hell of a "
 
2012-04-14 07:49:08 AM  

NDP2: Granolabar: propasaurus: doglover: SilentStrider: Its soda. Calling it soda or sodapop should be illegal.

It's pop.

It's coke.

It's a mixer.

Surveys assume people in a particular region use only one term. What about those who alternate? I'm from the Pacific Northwest and I alternate between using "soda" and "pop" to describe carbonated beverages. However, I lived in California for a time so maybe that has something to do with it.


Same here.

/geographically and linguistically
 
2012-04-14 07:51:50 AM  

vudukungfu: TheJoe03: Where the hell is hella? Most people under 50 say that word at least once in a while if they are from NorCal. I guess this list had nothing to do with slang terms people actually say.

Vocal contration of "hell of a "


not necessarily.... "The show I went to was hella cool."
 
2012-04-14 07:51:54 AM  

Nogale: Is this where Farkers from the places on this list say they've NEVER heard any of these words?


domo_kun_sai: I've lived in Wisconsin for 18 years and have never heard anyone say these words.
So, the list is a lie.


debug: I've lived in PA, VA and DC and have not heard one of those words before in my entire life.


Jilaad: I've lived in Virginia for 33 years and haven't heard a single one of these.


They do if they live in spendy neighborhoods.
 
2012-04-14 07:53:32 AM  

magores: not necessarily.... "The show I went to was hella cool."


Not that all people use an adopted word properly.

No, if you will excuse me, I have to go fix my car. It shiat the bed last night and I need it to go get lunch, a grinder and drag it through the garden.
 
2012-04-14 07:54:41 AM  
Need to get my pop and my bismark then go clean out the collywobbles from under the bed.


//Drank way to much Wapatoolie as a college student at both UW Stevens Point and UW Oshkosh - isn't true wapatoolie unless it is made in a garbage can. (yes, that is the correct spelling)
 
2012-04-14 07:57:26 AM  

lewismarktwo: These words are almost certainly not good enough to enter the general lexicon. Otherwise we might have heard of a few.


They're older words that people used to use, but that fell out of regional use with the advent of radio and especially television, both of which popularized a sanitized version of the particular vocabulary of the early to mid 20th century Atlantic states.
 
2012-04-14 07:57:36 AM  
c3405147.r47.cf0.rackcdn.com
 
2012-04-14 08:02:12 AM  

Gordon Bennett: That's it. As of now I hereby withdraw your licence to use the English language.

Destroy someone else's. Preferably the French.


That's a funny thing to say, because the reason French is so moribund and esoteric as a language is because it, unlike English, has a group of official censors maintained by the French government who's job it is to keep the language stuck in the 1900s by acting on the snobbery you just expressed.

One of the great strengths of English is that in the 20th century our linguists have mostly become descriptionists concerned with recording actual use, instead of proscriptionists concerned with what ought to be the "official" vocabulary of the language. As if the fantasy that if you just don't put a word down in a dictionary, people will stop using it could ever be true.
 
2012-04-14 08:02:46 AM  

Slag Heap: EvilEgg: Been in CT for 10 years never heard the word jasm.

Nineinchnosehair:
??? No ???
I was born here; maybe I don't hang around enough 90 year old men who think they're the cat's pajamas or something???

This and this. Was born and raised in CT, this is the first time I've heard it...?!


Lived in CT all my life, never heard it either.
 
2012-04-14 08:04:50 AM  

jingks: Suprised they didn't have "steamed hams" listed.

/ from upstate New York


penthesilea: No slang from the west on the list at all? List is hella stupid.


TheJoe03: Where the hell is hella? Most people under 50 say that word at least once in a while if they are from NorCal. I guess this list had nothing to do with slang terms people actually say.


Remember, this list is 19 words from a 5 volume dictionary.

//later today I will need to go by my Mom, the park is dedicating a new bubbler.
 
2012-04-14 08:05:30 AM  
I for one use 'buffle-headed' regularly, but not because I'm from Pennsylvania. I know the term primarily from Imoen of Baldur's Gate, who would call the rest of the party this if you ever moved her to the "party-leader" slot.
 
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