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(The Sun)   Not news: Mensa accepts girl with an IQ of 159. News: she's four years old   (thesun.co.uk) divider line 119
    More: Spiffy, Mensa, Carol Vorderman, University of Southampton, Gatwick Airport, accomplishments  
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6671 clicks; posted to Geek » on 13 Apr 2012 at 2:27 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-04-13 12:54:48 PM  
IQ tests are bullshiat. Still, really smart kid, I hope she's allowed to have some sort of normal childhood.
 
2012-04-13 01:05:43 PM  
Mensa will take just about anyone these days.
 
2012-04-13 01:23:21 PM  
When she grows up she's gonna be a hottie.
 
2012-04-13 01:25:36 PM  

timujin: I hope she's allowed to have some sort of normal childhood.


I heard her parents tried to get her into Mensa at the age 4. Not happening.
 
2012-04-13 01:35:32 PM  

impaler: timujin: I hope she's allowed to have some sort of normal childhood.

I heard her parents tried to get her into Mensa at the age 4. Not happening.


right, duh
 
2012-04-13 01:38:08 PM  
So she can write in sentences and draw figures. I'm sure she'll fit right in.
 
2012-04-13 02:08:14 PM  
I bet she makes the smartest sandwiches.
 
2012-04-13 02:29:38 PM  
oil her up and have her sent to my chambers
 
2012-04-13 02:34:10 PM  
Yes, the Sun. I believe it.
 
2012-04-13 02:43:33 PM  
psshhh, that's nothing

I've been keeping track and if farkers' comments can be trusted, the average IQ on fark is 243
 
2012-04-13 02:44:37 PM  
Goddammit. Does no one even try anymore? First, using lame memes in your headline is... lame. Second, if you must do it, at least use the entire meme in its correct format, which is...

Not news>News>Fark

Ex. Not news: Subby botches headline. News: Just kidding, that's not news it happens every day. Fark: By a hermaphrodite.
 
2012-04-13 02:50:56 PM  
1. Why does her age matter? If her "mental age" is 1.59 times her chronological age her IQ is 159. It doesn't matter if she is 4, 14, or 40, unless fapping is involved.

2. Stephen Hawking is only 160? I've known plenty of people in that range and none of them is bright enough to invent time.
 
2012-04-13 02:53:58 PM  

Sanduskyed In The Shower: oil her up and have her sent to my chambers


Thought you only liked boys?
 
2012-04-13 02:54:03 PM  
good on her.


csb: my younger son is like freaky clever. two and a half year olds should not be able to do the thing he can. i am in fact actively afraid to put him on a seesaw for fear he'll deduce the principals of leverage(which he might already be working out) and then we're farked.

kid's going to be fusing hydrogen by the time he's ten, i swear.

and going by his frame and build he's going to be a big fella too. maybe linebacker sized. he's also capable of dead silent hijinks, moreso than his siblings and cousins could ever hope to have pulled off.

he's going to be a very scary guy when he's full grown...
 
2012-04-13 02:54:51 PM  

timujin: IQ tests are bullshiat. Still, really smart kid, I hope she's allowed to have some sort of normal childhood.


In highschool, my psychology teacher gave the class a Mensa entrance test/IQ test, whatever the hell they call it. Most didn't score high enough to get in. We spent a couple of weeks learning how to solve logic problems and taking practice quizzes. At the end of the class, 80% or so passed the test.

/Yeah, we're all really impressed
 
2012-04-13 03:00:48 PM  
aren't IQ tests for children relative to their age?
 
2012-04-13 03:03:33 PM  

born_yesterday: timujin: IQ tests are bullshiat. Still, really smart kid, I hope she's allowed to have some sort of normal childhood.

In highschool, my psychology teacher gave the class a Mensa entrance test/IQ test, whatever the hell they call it. Most didn't score high enough to get in. We spent a couple of weeks learning how to solve logic problems and taking practice quizzes. At the end of the class, 80% or so passed the test.

/Yeah, we're all really impressed


They gave me one in second grade. I scored embarrassingly high, literally unbelievably high. High enough I didn't believe it until I was a teenager and found the results in some old school stuff my mom had saved. I was given another one in fifth grade and scored about thirty points less, but still well into the genius range. I am not a genius. Turns out I'm just really good at taking tests.
 
2012-04-13 03:14:41 PM  

Sanduskyed In The Shower: oil her up and have her sent to my chambers


How much for the little girl?

i1020.photobucket.com
 
2012-04-13 03:19:18 PM  

born_yesterday: timujin: IQ tests are bullshiat. Still, really smart kid, I hope she's allowed to have some sort of normal childhood.

In highschool, my psychology teacher gave the class a Mensa entrance test/IQ test, whatever the hell they call it. Most didn't score high enough to get in. We spent a couple of weeks learning how to solve logic problems and taking practice quizzes. At the end of the class, 80% or so passed the test.

/Yeah, we're all really impressed


the 'entrance exam' is any standardized iq test, where you score at or above the 98th percentile for that test. On a test that is normalized at a score of 100, that equates to a score of 130/132 depending on the standard deviationused for that test. 99th percentile is approximately 135/137.

The sat test used to be accepted, but no longer due to a change many years ago. The us military asvab is still acceptable last i heard.

There are tests for people that are illiterate and non-verbal as well as well as the more usual written tests. So a child can score highly even without being able to read.
 
2012-04-13 03:23:07 PM  

pute kisses like a man: aren't IQ tests for children relative to their age?


iirc, tests are normed to the age of the person. I do not know the details, but the same score on the same test by people widely differing in age can result in a differing percentile score.
 
2012-04-13 03:23:24 PM  
Mensa is a program to suck money away from people who think they're smart, but are in fact extremely gullible and lacking in basic social skills.
 
2012-04-13 03:26:18 PM  

timujin: born_yesterday: timujin: IQ tests are bullshiat. Still, really smart kid, I hope she's allowed to have some sort of normal childhood.

In highschool, my psychology teacher gave the class a Mensa entrance test/IQ test, whatever the hell they call it. Most didn't score high enough to get in. We spent a couple of weeks learning how to solve logic problems and taking practice quizzes. At the end of the class, 80% or so passed the test.

/Yeah, we're all really impressed

They gave me one in second grade. I scored embarrassingly high, literally unbelievably high. High enough I didn't believe it until I was a teenager and found the results in some old school stuff my mom had saved. I was given another one in fifth grade and scored about thirty points less, but still well into the genius range. I am not a genius. Turns out I'm just really good at taking tests.


or you were being repressed by your school counselers and parents. That was a common practice not too long ago in the belief that it was better for the kid to not know how smart they were.

It often backfired.

That is why mensa has a gifted chikd progam aimed at helping gifted kids, and their parents.
 
2012-04-13 03:27:30 PM  
She also has an 8.9 on Hot Or Not.
 
2012-04-13 03:27:40 PM  
posting from a phone, please forgive mis-typing
 
2012-04-13 03:28:02 PM  

timujin: born_yesterday: timujin: IQ tests are bullshiat. Still, really smart kid, I hope she's allowed to have some sort of normal childhood.

In highschool, my psychology teacher gave the class a Mensa entrance test/IQ test, whatever the hell they call it. Most didn't score high enough to get in. We spent a couple of weeks learning how to solve logic problems and taking practice quizzes. At the end of the class, 80% or so passed the test.

/Yeah, we're all really impressed

They gave me one in second grade. I scored embarrassingly high, literally unbelievably high. High enough I didn't believe it until I was a teenager and found the results in some old school stuff my mom had saved. I was given another one in fifth grade and scored about thirty points less, but still well into the genius range. I am not a genius. Turns out I'm just really good at taking tests.


This, that, and that other thing, too.

IQ is a measure of predictability of how well you should do in school. It is more accurately called an "aptitude test" as it doesn't measure intelligence. We can't even agree on a definition for intelligence, let alone design a test for it.
 
zez
2012-04-13 03:28:58 PM  
My oldest child started reading around age 2 and when he went in for some testing for the school district when he was 3 the instructor realized she had to hide the answers on the paper she was reading to him because she soon realized he could read the answers upside down.

He's 8 now and reads and comprehends on a 9th grade level
 
2012-04-13 03:29:50 PM  

born_yesterday: In highschool, my psychology teacher gave the class a Mensa entrance test/IQ test, whatever the hell they call it. Most didn't score high enough to get in. We spent a couple of weeks learning how to solve logic problems and taking practice quizzes. At the end of the class, 80% or so passed the test.

/Yeah, we're all really impressed


Almost half?

Whoa.
 
2012-04-13 03:43:33 PM  

zez: My oldest child started reading around age 2 and when he went in for some testing for the school district when he was 3 the instructor realized she had to hide the answers on the paper she was reading to him because she soon realized he could read the answers upside down.

He's 8 now and reads and comprehends on a 9th grade level


I was much the same. A bona fide reading demon at an extremely early age. Now I'm almost 50 and stunningly normal. So do yourself a favor and send the kid to good schools.
 
2012-04-13 03:44:08 PM  
Newsflash: mensa accepts Cletus McGriffle.

/IQ tests: total bullsh*t. Was told I had a very high IQ. Bullsh*t, I know better.
 
2012-04-13 03:45:59 PM  

timujin: IQ tests are bullshiat.


The Downing Effect (new window)...

One of the main effects of illusory superiority in IQ is the Downing effect. This describes the tendency of people with a below average IQ to overestimate their IQ, and of people with an above average IQ to underestimate their IQ. The propensity to predictably misjudge one's own IQ was first noted by C. L. Downing who conducted the first cross-cultural studies on perceived 'intelligence'. His studies also evidenced that the ability to accurately estimate others' IQ was proportional to one's own IQ. This means that the lower the IQ of an individual, the less capable they are of appreciating and accurately appraising others' IQ.

Know how I know you're a mental lightweight?
 
2012-04-13 03:53:14 PM  
images.tvrage.com

/Because 167 is a bigger number than 159
 
2012-04-13 03:53:14 PM  
I see the main points have already been brought up:

1. IQ isn't everything, in fact it's rather silly to waste time comparing one person's IQ to another person's.
2. The MENSA test isn't that hard, especially if you study.
3. For something so unimportant and easy, people sure spend a lot of time talking about it.

My SAT, GRE, and MENSA book test suggest I'm somewhere in the 135-145IQ range.

...and my 1st semester GPA in college was a 0.7, and I wound up flunking out and going to community college.

Clearly, IQ isn't everything.
 
2012-04-13 03:56:58 PM  

Jackpot777: timujin: IQ tests are bullshiat.

The Downing Effect (new window)...

One of the main effects of illusory superiority in IQ is the Downing effect. This describes the tendency of people with a below average IQ to overestimate their IQ, and of people with an above average IQ to underestimate their IQ. The propensity to predictably misjudge one's own IQ was first noted by C. L. Downing who conducted the first cross-cultural studies on perceived 'intelligence'. His studies also evidenced that the ability to accurately estimate others' IQ was proportional to one's own IQ. This means that the lower the IQ of an individual, the less capable they are of appreciating and accurately appraising others' IQ.

Know how I know you're a mental lightweight?


Know how I know you didn't read the rest of the thread?
 
2012-04-13 03:57:09 PM  
Quick! Somebody get her the "Math is hard" Barbie. We don't need more competition.
 
2012-04-13 03:57:51 PM  

timujin: Jackpot777: timujin: IQ tests are bullshiat.

The Downing Effect (new window)...

One of the main effects of illusory superiority in IQ is the Downing effect. This describes the tendency of people with a below average IQ to overestimate their IQ, and of people with an above average IQ to underestimate their IQ. The propensity to predictably misjudge one's own IQ was first noted by C. L. Downing who conducted the first cross-cultural studies on perceived 'intelligence'. His studies also evidenced that the ability to accurately estimate others' IQ was proportional to one's own IQ. This means that the lower the IQ of an individual, the less capable they are of appreciating and accurately appraising others' IQ.

Know how I know you're a mental lightweight?

Know how I know you didn't read the rest of the thread?


Or realize the full implications of the Downing Effect, for that matter.
 
2012-04-13 03:58:10 PM  
"Mr Hankins and his artist wife Sophy also have a nine-year-old son called Isaac, who is a chorister at Winchester Cathedral. "

"Called" Isaac???? The reporter's score is obviously pretty low.... Poor lad is NAMED Isaac. You call a dog......

Dolt.
 
2012-04-13 03:59:30 PM  

timujin: Jackpot777: timujin: IQ tests are bullshiat.

The Downing Effect (new window)...

One of the main effects of illusory superiority in IQ is the Downing effect. This describes the tendency of people with a below average IQ to overestimate their IQ, and of people with an above average IQ to underestimate their IQ. The propensity to predictably misjudge one's own IQ was first noted by C. L. Downing who conducted the first cross-cultural studies on perceived 'intelligence'. His studies also evidenced that the ability to accurately estimate others' IQ was proportional to one's own IQ. This means that the lower the IQ of an individual, the less capable they are of appreciating and accurately appraising others' IQ.

Know how I know you're a mental lightweight?

Know how I know you didn't read the rest of the thread?


I'm thinking this should be fun in the end...
 
2012-04-13 04:02:10 PM  
And she has to get to the gym in 10 years and 26 minutes.

/I'd be funnier if I threw in a terrible photoshop with my comments
 
2012-04-13 04:02:24 PM  

Sanduskyed In The Shower: oil her up and have her sent to my chambers


Chasing oiled up children isn't an approved exercise. Our options available are limited to greased up things. It's not even a long list. Your options are a pig, a Scotsman, or a naked gay deaf-mute.
 
2012-04-13 04:02:25 PM  

Rent Party: timujin: born_yesterday: timujin: IQ tests are bullshiat. Still, really smart kid, I hope she's allowed to have some sort of normal childhood.

In highschool, my psychology teacher gave the class a Mensa entrance test/IQ test, whatever the hell they call it. Most didn't score high enough to get in. We spent a couple of weeks learning how to solve logic problems and taking practice quizzes. At the end of the class, 80% or so passed the test.

/Yeah, we're all really impressed

They gave me one in second grade. I scored embarrassingly high, literally unbelievably high. High enough I didn't believe it until I was a teenager and found the results in some old school stuff my mom had saved. I was given another one in fifth grade and scored about thirty points less, but still well into the genius range. I am not a genius. Turns out I'm just really good at taking tests.

This, that, and that other thing, too.

IQ is a measure of predictability of how well you should do in school. It is more accurately called an "aptitude test" as it doesn't measure intelligence. We can't even agree on a definition for intelligence, let alone design a test for it.


IQ is a very good predictor of "success in life" with "success" being defined as education level, job status, income and it even correlates with the number of sick days you take in a year. So yeah, maybe it doesn't say much over the complete set of possible "intelligences" but it does say a lot about how smart you are in getting ahead in life.

OT:
Her IQ will probably level of in the next few years. There has been a reasonably well documented disconnect between the IQ at age 1-10 and IQ at age 18.

/I've got a reference in one of my books somewhere but too lazy to look it up.
//Smart people often have motivational issues
 
2012-04-13 04:04:14 PM  
"Heidi's dad Matthew, from Winchester, Hants, hopes she can now skip a school year to ensure she is challenged when she is old enough to go."

So she can be the smartest AND least mature person in her class? I think that's an awesome combination, and a real recipe for success. Good call health lecturer dad.
 
2012-04-13 04:07:11 PM  
Describing someone's intelligence with a single number makes even less sense than describing someone's position in space-time with a single number.
 
2012-04-13 04:08:41 PM  

impaler: Describing someone's intelligence with a single number makes even less sense than describing someone's position in space-time with a single number.


I avoid using a number and stick with words. My position in space-time can be accurately described as "here".

;)
 
2012-04-13 04:09:34 PM  
I don't really remember why I saw this movie, but it's actually quite good at expressing what can go right and horribly wrong with "genius" children.
 
2012-04-13 04:10:51 PM  

Wellon Dowd: If her "mental age" is 1.59 times her chronological age her IQ is 159.


So she'd be a four-year-old with the mental acuity of a six-and-a-half-year-old. I can see why the brain geniuses at Mensa would want to party with her.
 
2012-04-13 04:11:28 PM  

impaler: Describing someone's intelligence with a single number makes even less sense than describing someone's position in space-time with a single number.


I am at the origin. Zero.

It is describing your position in the universe that requires a more complex description.
 
2012-04-13 04:15:06 PM  

impaler: Describing someone's intelligence with a single number makes even less sense than describing someone's position in space-time with a single number.


yes, you need four
 
2012-04-13 04:16:21 PM  
What's her thetan level?
 
2012-04-13 04:17:11 PM  
I don't know if this is all that impressive. The IQ tests I'm familiar with all scale with age.

I had a friend who was a school psychologist and was obsessed with IQ tests (he gave them every day as part of his job). He tested his child, and his child scored genius level, but then he said, "If only this were accurate. I'm going to have to test him again in a few years."

My brother also took an IQ test very young and came out a genius, but as an adult he's average..

It's all about developmental speed, and how the test is graded.

If the amount of questions she got right were matched against an adult she would not be a genius. Her score just shows how much smarter she is compared to other 4 year-olds that took the test ,and since not many 4 year-olds have taken IQ tests, the information isn't accurate.

This is because IQ scores are usually adjusted to compensate for people who take the test that are outside their testing data. If someone is younger than the average person taking the test, points are added to their score.

When I was 20 I took a test that had the opposite problem. My IQ test obsessed friend tested me for spatial reasoning. I did fine but there was one part of the test where I didn't connect two lines in my drawing. The prompt on that specific test said to re-create the drawing in the diagram as accurately as possible. Since I neglected to connect two lines I lost a point.

The problem was the test was developed for children aged 8 to 12. At my age of 20, I needed to have a perfect score, and even with a perfect score I'd be below average after compensating for age. On that test, because I took it out of the specified age range, missing one question made me score as if I were (at least spatially speaking) functionally retarded.

My friend teased me about that for years.

In short, an IQ test is only accurate when you're in the age range anticipated by the test designers. I have no doubt that she's a smart girl, but it's really pointless to say what her IQ is at her age.
 
2012-04-13 04:19:34 PM  

dryknife: born_yesterday: In highschool, my psychology teacher gave the class a Mensa entrance test/IQ test, whatever the hell they call it. Most didn't score high enough to get in. We spent a couple of weeks learning how to solve logic problems and taking practice quizzes. At the end of the class, 80% or so passed the test.

/Yeah, we're all really impressed

Almost half?

Whoa.


You must have learned new math. 'half' isn't even a real number. 80% is more closer to eleventy-fifths.
 
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