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(Gizmodo)   Want a job at Google? It's as simple as just doodling a quick resume   (gizmodo.com) divider line 27
    More: Spiffy, Google, resumes, NBC Bay Area, Jules Verne  
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6524 clicks; posted to Business » on 13 Apr 2012 at 10:09 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



27 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2012-04-13 10:15:56 AM  
.. after acquiring a Fine Arts degree, I see. -_-

/(currently-unemployed) graphic artist with 20 years experience
//never went to art school
///none of my previous employers seemed to care about that
 
2012-04-13 10:22:46 AM  
.. it seems Google has changed the qualifications since I'd first seen their listing, last month; now it says, "4 years equivalent experience" is acceptable.

/to the resume cave!
 
2012-04-13 10:27:18 AM  

noazark: .. it seems Google has changed the qualifications since I'd first seen their listing, last month; now it says, "4 years equivalent experience" is acceptable.

/to the resume cave!


GL, and if u get the job your first one should be a fark inspired doogle
 
2012-04-13 10:37:26 AM  
Maybe Google should hire someone to make their maps print correctly, or not have ridiculous mistakes that people pointed out years ago.
 
2012-04-13 10:51:20 AM  

noazark: .. after acquiring a Fine Arts degree, I see. -_-

/(currently-unemployed) graphic artist with 20 years experience
//never went to art school
///none of my previous employers seemed to care about that


Experience is king. Employers seem to have collectively decided a degree is worthless.
Especially if you're a recent graduate. Apparently I'm supposed to get 3-5 years of experience working somewhere before I can get a decent job, but the trick is finding that mythical employer.
 
2012-04-13 11:10:14 AM  

Sergeant Grumbles:
Experience is king. Employers seem to have collectively decided a degree is worthless.
Especially if you're a recent graduate. Apparently I'm supposed to get 3-5 years of experience working somewhere before I can get a decent job, but the trick is finding that mythical employer.


I hate that, so so much. I'm about to graduate with a degree focus in electron microscopy, only problem being its a skill that has traditionally been acquired at the MS or PhD levels.

Most of the job listings for what I actually do are 5 years of experience and two degree's more than I have.

/world needs ditch diggers too.
//Lives in Michigan.
///no ditch diggers.
 
2012-04-13 11:10:44 AM  

Sergeant Grumbles: noazark: .. after acquiring a Fine Arts degree, I see. -_-

/(currently-unemployed) graphic artist with 20 years experience
//never went to art school
///none of my previous employers seemed to care about that

Experience is king. Employers seem to have collectively decided a degree is worthless.
Especially if you're a recent graduate. Apparently I'm supposed to get 3-5 years of experience working somewhere before I can get a decent job, but the trick is finding that mythical employer.


I like the places asking for experience before hiring you into an entry level position.
Yeah.
Fantastic. Thanks for that.
 
2012-04-13 11:34:05 AM  

Bunnyhat: I like the places asking for experience before hiring you into an entry level position.
Yeah.
Fantastic. Thanks for that.



The problem is, employers can get exactly what they're asking for.
A recent Debbie-Downer of a job application, I happened to notice a Careerbuilder posting I'd applied to.
Entry Level Graphic Design Assistant.
Applicants' Average Years of Experience: 20+

Eight of the people who applied had Master's degrees. +20 years of experience. Graphics Design Assistant.

What the holy fark is someone with 1 year of experience supposed to do? Retail and fast food sure aren't going to pay for my farking student loans. And I'll be pleasantly surprised when I get something besides smug when I hear "A college degree doesn't guarantee you a job. You are responsible for your loans even if you can't find employment in your field."

Getting to the point where I just don't give a shiat. I'm 28 and can barely find work even with experience. If I can, I'll feel no guilt escaping my loans by moving to a state that doesn't allow wage garnishment, or to a different country altogether. Not like I'll ever be able to get the credit for a house or a car with student loan debt hanging over my head.
 
2012-04-13 11:41:15 AM  
If you're entering a field where all available entry-level jobs require experience, your field is over satuarated.

You may need to find another career.

shiat happens.

Gotta start over.
 
2012-04-13 12:01:11 PM  

Sergeant Grumbles: Bunnyhat: I like the places asking for experience before hiring you into an entry level position.
Yeah.
Fantastic. Thanks for that.


The problem is, employers can get exactly what they're asking for.
A recent Debbie-Downer of a job application, I happened to notice a Careerbuilder posting I'd applied to.
Entry Level Graphic Design Assistant.
Applicants' Average Years of Experience: 20+

Eight of the people who applied had Master's degrees. +20 years of experience. Graphics Design Assistant.

What the holy fark is someone with 1 year of experience supposed to do? Retail and fast food sure aren't going to pay for my farking student loans. And I'll be pleasantly surprised when I get something besides smug when I hear "A college degree doesn't guarantee you a job. You are responsible for your loans even if you can't find employment in your field."

Getting to the point where I just don't give a shiat. I'm 28 and can barely find work even with experience. If I can, I'll feel no guilt escaping my loans by moving to a state that doesn't allow wage garnishment, or to a different country altogether. Not like I'll ever be able to get the credit for a house or a car with student loan debt hanging over my head.


Those stats don't mean as much as you think.

CareerBuilder has "One click apply". You get a table of similar jobs and all you have to do is check a box. People never even read the descriptions, and often just click everything without reading the title. It's a big reason why, when I was a recruiter, I hated Career Builder. We regularly had overqualified people "apply" who weren't the least bit interested in the job and didn't even know they had applied for it.
 
2012-04-13 12:03:52 PM  

MugzyBrown: If you're entering a field where all available entry-level jobs require experience, your field is over satuarated.

You may need to find another career.

shiat happens.

Gotta start over.


If this was actually doable, I don't think anyone would complain. But putting in 4 years of college and all of the costs, even in a field that's growing when you start college but terrible as you finish, and you can't help but call shenanigans when some bastard says "You should have studied X instead of Y."
There is no starting over. I'm saddled with the debt from my previous degree. I afford can't go back and get another one, however willing or capable I might be. Can't survive on non-degree work, so what does that leave?

Like I said, I would have zero regrets about skipping town on the debt entirely, if only because there isn't a significant amount of people that acknowledge crippling student loan debt in a crap economy as a big problem. Yet another ugly head of "I've got mine, fark you."
 
2012-04-13 12:06:17 PM  

SharkTrager: Those stats don't mean as much as you think.

CareerBuilder has "One click apply". You get a table of similar jobs and all you have to do is check a box. People never even read the descriptions, and often just click everything without reading the title. It's a big reason why, when I was a recruiter, I hated Career Builder. We regularly had overqualified people "apply" who weren't the least bit interested in the job and didn't even know they had applied for it.


Considering how helpful Careerbuilder has been (it's not), I don't really disbelieve you. On the other hand, why are these overqualified people wasting their time? It's doubly depressing.
 
2012-04-13 12:06:20 PM  
CareerBuilder has "One click apply".

Yeah, my wife is looking and several of the jobs want an online application and a snail-mail cover letter. Really weeds out people who shotgun the site.
 
2012-04-13 12:16:11 PM  

Sergeant Grumbles: There is no starting over. I'm saddled with the debt from my previous degree. I afford can't go back and get another one, however willing or capable I might be. Can't survive on non-degree work, so what does that leave?


That's BS.

I was in a field for 5 years, progressed from unpaid intern to half decent salary, got laid off, couldn't find another job.

Totally changed fields.. like night and day, started again hourly BS work, 8 years later I have professional designations in my new field and am making decent middle-class money.

Maybe you have to adjust what you feel is 'entry level', maybe you have to live with a roomate or two and work a crappy job, but if you're just out of college, you have time to change careers a few times
 
wee
2012-04-13 12:49:30 PM  

natazha: Yeah, my wife is looking and several of the jobs want an online application and a snail-mail cover letter. Really weeds out people who shotgun the site.


We toss any resume that doesn't have a cover letter, because we have to know if they can communicate. If they can't follow the simple instructions to include one, then we don't bother looking at the resume. If they can't write well in their cover letter, then we don't bother calling them. We generally don't even care what the cover letter actually says, just that it says it well.
 
2012-04-13 12:50:20 PM  
OMG GOOGLE IS HONROING SOME ARTIST/MUSICIAN/INVENTOR YOUVE NEVER HEARD OF LETS WRITE AN ARTICLE ABOUT IT
 
2012-04-13 01:08:29 PM  

MugzyBrown: Totally changed fields.. like night and day, started again hourly BS work, 8 years later I have professional designations in my new field and am making decent middle-class money.


When?
That's the only question, and the difference between BS and truth.
8 years ago you could do that.
8 years ago college cost 50% what it does now;.
18 years ago, you could do it easily, and college wasn't even necessary if you could prove you new anything about IT.
Now? Employers won't look at you unless you have specific unique experience, or lots of experience. They're unwilling to train. fark, having a Graphic Design and a Studio Art degree, Office Depot thinks I'm not fit to work in their print department.
I'd be happy getting anything that paid my bills, but nothing in the field is a sure bet, and everything outside the field thinks I'll bail the second something in the field opens up.
 
2012-04-13 01:41:34 PM  
Graphic design is a terrible industry to get into. It's oversaturated with creative people; the reason you see these jobs out there demanding such high levels of education and experience is because there is a supply of it out there. I wouldn't even bother trying to start something up yourself, either - the small businessman doesn't need to hire you to draw him something, he can just go out to one of these "starving artist" sites like 99designs.com and get a new logo done up for $300 without any of the hassle. Even if you could convince him to take you on as a contractor, since for the most part it's a one and done transaction, you very seldom get the repeat clientele that would get you any kind of stability in terms of pay. The only people making it as graphic designers get into the major design houses and get treated like slave labor for years and then use that experience to get into a high-paying firm. And they're the lucky ones.

Unfortunately, graphic design, like music or fine art or calligraphy, should be considered a hobby and not a primary source of income. The only way that you'll make it worth your while is by including the "intrinsic value" and the "joy of the work" as a part of your overall compensation package. So, you can live poor, but you'll have fun with your job. I guess in some ways you'll be beating the business majors, at least.
 
2012-04-13 01:43:31 PM  

SharkTrager: CareerBuilder has "One click apply". You get a table of similar jobs and all you have to do is check a box. People never even read the descriptions, and often just click everything without reading the title. It's a big reason why, when I was a recruiter, I hated Career Builder. We regularly had overqualified people "apply" who weren't the least bit interested in the job and didn't even know they had applied for it.


I've run into that with a job we recently filled. We don't use Career Builder, but no matter what site it was there are plenty of people just submitting resumes to anything in their field.

The funny part is when we call someone in for an interview (it was for an intern position), and they show up not only knowing nothing about our company, but expecting a full time position with a 6 figure salary, despite the fact that the position is clearly labelled an entry level intern position and the HR person who sets up the interviews confirms with them before making the appointment the pay, hours, and responsibilities of the position.

Apparently some people are so egotistical they think they can walk in to an interview for an internship and walk out the head of the division.

Also amazing how few people bother to submit a cover letter or personal message with their resume. I can guarantee anyone who bothered to, even if it was just a 1 line message attached to the resume, got first consideration.
 
2012-04-13 01:52:28 PM  

SharkTrager: CareerBuilder has "One click apply". You get a table of similar jobs and all you have to do is check a box. People never even read the descriptions, and often just click everything without reading the title. It's a big reason why, when I was a recruiter, I hated Career Builder. We regularly had overqualified people "apply" who weren't the least bit interested in the job and didn't even know they had applied for it.


Which is why if the resume isn't accompanied by a cover letter tailored to the exact company and position being applied for, it gets binned.

If you've clearly taken some time to prepare your application, I'll take some time to consider it. If you spent one second, so will I.
 
2012-04-13 05:42:57 PM  
Am I crazy in thinking the guy from The Perry Bible Fellowship would make a fantastic doodler?
 
2012-04-13 08:51:03 PM  
Google long ago crossed that threshold into having more money than sense.
 
2012-04-13 10:42:57 PM  

BonesJackson: Am I crazy in thinking the guy from The Perry Bible Fellowship would make a fantastic doodler?


They would be awesome, but there would only be one every 6 months
 
2012-04-14 04:05:38 AM  

Sergeant Grumbles: Bunnyhat: I like the places asking for experience before hiring you into an entry level position.
Yeah.
Fantastic. Thanks for that.


The problem is, employers can get exactly what they're asking for.
A recent Debbie-Downer of a job application, I happened to notice a Careerbuilder posting I'd applied to.
Entry Level Graphic Design Assistant.
Applicants' Average Years of Experience: 20+

Eight of the people who applied had Master's degrees. +20 years of experience. Graphics Design Assistant.

What the holy fark is someone with 1 year of experience supposed to do? Retail and fast food sure aren't going to pay for my farking student loans. And I'll be pleasantly surprised when I get something besides smug when I hear "A college degree doesn't guarantee you a job. You are responsible for your loans even if you can't find employment in your field."

Getting to the point where I just don't give a shiat. I'm 28 and can barely find work even with experience. If I can, I'll feel no guilt escaping my loans by moving to a state that doesn't allow wage garnishment, or to a different country altogether. Not like I'll ever be able to get the credit for a house or a car with student loan debt hanging over my head.


A career is as much, if not more, about your personal relationships as your resume or qualifications. You need to get an "in" with people who do what you want to do. That means find people who do your dream job, and talk to them. Offer to work for them, for free. Offer to get them coffee, take out their trash, wash their BVDs, whatever they want to get them to notice and respect your work ethic and enthusiasm. Meanwhile you're absorbing the details of what their job entails. Get a moonlight gig at Micky Ds to keep the bill collectors at bay for a year or two if needed. Then when the next gig comes open, let them know you want the job. It may not be ideal, but sadly there isn't an ideal solution for your predicament. And in the grand scheme of thing, if it truly leads to a job you think you'll enjoy for the majority of your working career, it's well worth it. You would be surprised how many people end up miserable their entire 40 year careers because they took an "any port in a storm" job at the beginning and it led them down a path away from what they really wanted to do. But above all, curling up on the fetal position isn't an option.
 
2012-04-14 05:32:11 AM  
College is a load of horse shiat. I'd say get a decent job or career first, then blow money on school.

I had a strong hunch that this retarded axiom of "degree-then-job" that is foisted upon our youth was a crock before getting my HS diploma. It's amazing how many people actually buy into it. It's terribly sad; there are so many other options.

However, in a damning twist of irony, I can't get past this superintendent position without a four year piece of paper, so I'm reluctantly pursuing that now. Sorry to you to the three of you: competency, skill, and experience. You're gonna have to sit this one out in favor of writing essays. Yeah, essays. That helps me. A lot. Thanks, college.

/if you think I'm surly here on Fark, you haven't seen me in the classrooms which I don't want to be in ;)
 
2012-04-14 09:10:13 AM  

Contents Under Pressure: Google long ago crossed that threshold into having more money than sense.


Why? This is for a single position in a multi-billion dollar company with tens of thousands of employees. The silly little doodles often get more press than serious business announcements. (The recent Muybridge one was genius)

Seems to me other companies ought to be looking into something whimsical as well.
 
2012-04-14 12:19:59 PM  

InmanRoshi: Offer to work for them, for free.


No.
 
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