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(New Zealand Herald)   Old fruit is better for you says study, Ian McKellen   (nzherald.co.nz) divider line 73
    More: Interesting, Ian McKellen, fruits  
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6466 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Apr 2012 at 9:12 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-04-13 03:12:51 AM
This took me a second, and I LOLd. Pretty hard.
 
2012-04-13 03:30:11 AM
Kudos.
 
2012-04-13 03:38:32 AM
Subby wins +1 internets pick it up from Drew.
 
2012-04-13 06:02:12 AM
roflrazzi.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-04-13 06:39:49 AM
But seriously, folks.

I have read many times that today's corporate fruit and vegetables aren't what they were. For example, the factoid that oranges had eight times more vitamin C in them in the 1950s than they do today.

Part of the problem is forcing fruits and vegetables with too much water, growing them too fast, dying them and waxing them and selling them before their time, still unripe. This is particularly obnoxious with fruit and vegetables that do not ripen after they are picked--you get hard, tasteless, indigestible "food" that costs more and has less nutritional value.

But, as this article points out, the problem isn't just production, shipping, display, etc. (these are mostly matters of time--vegetables and fruit can lose half of their flavour and food value in 24 hours after picking), but also of breeding. When you breed for cosmetic or shelf-life advantages, you lose flavour and scent and nutrition. Plants are living things and the energy they devote to one job they can not devote to other jobs.

Our food is literally being turned into beautiful but tasteless, food valueless simulacra. Wax fruit. Plastic vegetables. Plaster of paris pastries.

Adulteration and shipping have long been problems but much of today's produce is instrinsically less valuable due to loss of bio-diversity, forcing of growth times, unripeness, artificial enhancement, etc.

No matter how much bad news I see about the agro-industry, there's always more bad news. You can't even trust "whole foods" to be natural and whole. No wonder the "organic", localvore and do-it-youself movements are coming on so strong. If you don't grow it yourself, you don't know what you are getting. You can't possibly learn enough to navigate a store with 100,000 different items for sale safely. The consumer is powerless before the sheer volume of information they'd need to make wise and safe choices.

Those who are rich enough to buy artisinal food from heirloom farmers are in luck. They can eat as well as medieval peasants. But the rest of us are literally eating fraudulent food. It claims to be what it is not, like a heavily made-up aging prostitute who's literally not as fresh and virginal as she appears.
 
2012-04-13 09:27:18 AM
Modern plant breeding has tripled yields, but has also produced fruits with dramatically reduced amounts of calcium, vitamin A, and vitamin C, and tomatoes that have fourteen times more sodium than the tomatoes our parents enjoyed. Link (new window)

brantgoose: Those who are rich enough to buy artisinal food from heirloom farmers are in luck. They can eat as well as medieval peasants.


/made me lol
//agree to all
 
2012-04-13 09:28:34 AM

brantgoose: But seriously, folks.

I have read many times that today's corporate fruit and vegetables aren't what they were. For example, the factoid that oranges had eight times more vitamin C in them in the 1950s than they do today.

Part of the problem is forcing fruits and vegetables with too much water, growing them too fast, dying them and waxing them and selling them before their time, still unripe. This is particularly obnoxious with fruit and vegetables that do not ripen after they are picked--you get hard, tasteless, indigestible "food" that costs more and has less nutritional value.

But, as this article points out, the problem isn't just production, shipping, display, etc. (these are mostly matters of time--vegetables and fruit can lose half of their flavour and food value in 24 hours after picking), but also of breeding. When you breed for cosmetic or shelf-life advantages, you lose flavour and scent and nutrition. Plants are living things and the energy they devote to one job they can not devote to other jobs.

Our food is literally being turned into beautiful but tasteless, food valueless simulacra. Wax fruit. Plastic vegetables. Plaster of paris pastries.

Adulteration and shipping have long been problems but much of today's produce is instrinsically less valuable due to loss of bio-diversity, forcing of growth times, unripeness, artificial enhancement, etc.

No matter how much bad news I see about the agro-industry, there's always more bad news. You can't even trust "whole foods" to be natural and whole. No wonder the "organic", localvore and do-it-youself movements are coming on so strong. If you don't grow it yourself, you don't know what you are getting. You can't possibly learn enough to navigate a store with 100,000 different items for sale safely. The consumer is powerless before the sheer volume of information they'd need to make wise and safe choices.

Those who are rich enough to buy artisinal food from heirloom farmers are in luck. They can eat as wel ...


I really wanted to be smart ass b/c you're way too serious for a Friday but all I can say is THIS
 
2012-04-13 09:32:24 AM
because old fruit......has fermented?

I got nothin'
 
2012-04-13 09:33:02 AM
Subby, you magnificent bastard! +5
 
2012-04-13 09:33:18 AM

brantgoose: Those who are rich enough to buy artisinal food from heirloom farmers are in luck. They can eat as well as medieval peasants. But the rest of us are literally eating fraudulent food. It claims to be what it is not, like a heavily made-up aging prostitute who's literally not as fresh and virginal as she appears.


Sort of. Obviously people until very recently (early 20th century?) didn't know about things like vitamins or macronutrients. Milk, IIRC, is more nutritious (and certainly safer!) today.

But yes, I have also read about the horrible things we do to food to make it available to more people. This is one of those good thing/bad thing situations.
 
2012-04-13 09:40:40 AM

brantgoose: But seriously, folks.

I have read many times that today's corporate fruit and vegetables aren't what they were. For example, the factoid that oranges had eight times more vitamin C in them in the 1950s than they do today.

Part of the problem is forcing fruits and vegetables with too much water, growing them too fast, dying them and waxing them and selling them before their time, still unripe. This is particularly obnoxious with fruit and vegetables that do not ripen after they are picked--you get hard, tasteless, indigestible "food" that costs more and has less nutritional value.


I wonder if more wide spread CSA farms are possible solution the problems you've mentioned? I have no idea of the cost of an annual investment in a CSA farm. Couldn't possibly be affordable for someone such as I.

Those who are rich enough to buy artisinal food from heirloom farmers are in luck. They can eat as well as medieval peasants.

That statement makes me wonder if you were actually being serious in your post, or just having a laugh. I had no idea medieval peasants ate 'well.'
 
2012-04-13 09:44:53 AM
I've planted over a dozen fruit and berry trees in my yard over the last several years, most of which are native, non-engineered fruits and berries, so I should live forever!! Of course, I planted them strictly so I could turn them into delicious alcohol, but that's just my way of preserving them for the long winter. I also plant 2 huge gardens every year. I love tomatoes, but I've never in my life bought one from a grocery story that didn't taste like cardboard. Most of the tomatoes I plant are highly engineered to be resistant to diseases and pests, so I don't know how they compare nutrition-wise to mass-produced tomatoes or heirloom varieties. I do know I probably take better care of my soil, rotate my crops every year, and don't pile on artificial fertilizers and/or herbicides/pesticides, so I would think they would still have to be better than commercially farmed ones.
 
2012-04-13 09:45:38 AM

brantgoose: But seriously, folks.

I have read many times that today's corporate fruit and vegetables aren't what they were. For example, the factoid that oranges had eight times more vitamin C in them in the 1950s than they do today.

Part of the problem is forcing fruits and vegetables with too much water, growing them too fast, dying them and waxing them and selling them before their time, still unripe. This is particularly obnoxious with fruit and vegetables that do not ripen after they are picked--you get hard, tasteless, indigestible "food" that costs more and has less nutritional value.

But, as this article points out, the problem isn't just production, shipping, display, etc. (these are mostly matters of time--vegetables and fruit can lose half of their flavour and food value in 24 hours after picking), but also of breeding. When you breed for cosmetic or shelf-life advantages, you lose flavour and scent and nutrition. Plants are living things and the energy they devote to one job they can not devote to other jobs.

Our food is literally being turned into beautiful but tasteless, food valueless simulacra. Wax fruit. Plastic vegetables. Plaster of paris pastries.

Adulteration and shipping have long been problems but much of today's produce is instrinsically less valuable due to loss of bio-diversity, forcing of growth times, unripeness, artificial enhancement, etc.

No matter how much bad news I see about the agro-industry, there's always more bad news. You can't even trust "whole foods" to be natural and whole. No wonder the "organic", localvore and do-it-youself movements are coming on so strong. If you don't grow it yourself, you don't know what you are getting. You can't possibly learn enough to navigate a store with 100,000 different items for sale safely. The consumer is powerless before the sheer volume of information they'd need to make wise and safe choices.

Those who are rich enough to buy artisinal food from heirloom farmers are in luck. They can eat as wel ...


Well said.
 
2012-04-13 09:53:58 AM

brantgoose: Those who are rich enough to buy artisinal food from heirloom farmers are in luck. They can eat as well as medieval peasants. But the rest of us are literally eating fraudulent food. It claims to be what it is not, like a heavily made-up aging prostitute who's literally not as fresh and virginal as she appears.


Or you could just grow your own food. Heirloom seeds are making a huge comeback lately in the seed/plant market. If you live in an apartment, find a local community garden in your area. If you have a balcony or small yard, then look into vertical gardening and EarthBoxes. If you can afford the electricity (or money of LEDs), look into an indoor system (or hydroponics). In this day and age growing vegetable and fruits is easy. Hell I live in MT and have a two-year old container banana tree that is growing like crazy (still have two more years before it will produce though). I have a friend that has a heirloom dwarf variety apple tree she grows in a pot since she lives in an apartment which produces the tastiest apples. I'm also experimenting with growing potatoes in a vertical garden this year (4'x4' area, maybe 5' tall when it gets there) that apparently can yield 100 lbs. of potatoes (though I seriously hope not since I have no idea how my husband and I would eat that much).

Just saying there have been creative and awesome advancements in both indoor vegetable gardening and small space vegetable gardening. There isn't really an excuse to say "only rich people can afford healthy fruits and vegetables".
 
2012-04-13 09:55:39 AM
What, no Phloridzin tag?
 
2012-04-13 09:56:05 AM
*slow clap*
 
2012-04-13 10:00:25 AM

Cythraul: I wonder if more wide spread CSA farms are possible solution the problems you've mentioned? I have no idea of the cost of an annual investment in a CSA farm. Couldn't possibly be affordable for someone such as I.


For me, it's $575 for a box May-November, or about $21/week. That's not so bad... but you *really* have to learn to love kale.
 
2012-04-13 10:04:23 AM
The Moseley family garden last June. That's just for two of us, and I'm expanding again this year. Time for some strawberry plants and more beans and corn.

lh4.googleusercontent.com

lh3.googleusercontent.com

lh6.googleusercontent.com

lh4.googleusercontent.com

/yeah I was a little late with first cutting
//it was a busy year, will be again this year
 
2012-04-13 10:05:48 AM
I had one of the only truly jaw-dropping moments of my life when I learned that Ian McKellan was gay. Not that there's anything wrong with that, but of all the people who I would have suspected of being gay, he was most certainly NOT on the list.
 
2012-04-13 10:06:09 AM
Ye miserable, crawlin' worms. Are ye here again then?

Have ye come like Nimshi, son of Rehoboam, secretly out of your doomed houses, to hear what's comin' to ye? Have ye come, old and young, sick and well, matrons and virgins, if there be any virgins amongst you, which is not likely, the world being in the wicked state that it is.

Have ye come to hear me tell you of the great, crimson, licking flames of hell fire? Aye! You've come, dozens of ye. Like rats to the granary, like field mice when it's harvest home. And what good will it do ye? You're all damned! Damned!

Do you ever stop to think what that word means? No, you don't. It means endless, horrifying torment! It means your poor, sinful bodies stretched out on red-hot gridirons, in the nethermost, fiery pit of hell and those demons mocking ye while they waves cooling jellies in front of ye.

You know what it's like when you burn your hand, taking a cake out of the oven, or lighting one of them godless cigarettes? And it stings with a fearful pain, aye? And you run to clap a bit of butter on it to take the pain away, aye?

Well, I'll tell ye, there'll be no butter in hell!
 
2012-04-13 10:13:26 AM

Cythraul: I wonder if more wide spread CSA farms are possible solution the problems you've mentioned? I have no idea of the cost of an annual investment in a CSA farm. Couldn't possibly be affordable for someone such as I.


i44.tinypic.com

What a CSA farm might look like.

I would think that just feeding, housing, and clothing the slaves alone would be a significant expense. Even with petroleum prices as high as they are, I'm thinking a tractor would be better.
 
2012-04-13 10:14:35 AM

brantgoose: No matter how much bad news I see about the agro-industry, there's always more bad news. You can't even trust "whole foods" to be natural and whole. No wonder the "organic", localvore and do-it-youself movements are coming on so strong.


Well, that and companies can sell the same product in pastel packaging, call it "all-natural", and throw a 50% markup on it.
 
2012-04-13 10:14:57 AM

brantgoose: Those who are rich enough to buy artisinal food from heirloom farmers are in luck. They can eat as well as medieval peasants.


Tomatoes weren't introduced to Europe until 1544 (they're a new World fruit). They weren't eaten until the 1650s, because as a nightshade, they were presumed to be poisonous (and the leaves are).

So medieval peasants didn't eat tomatoes at all.
 
2012-04-13 10:15:13 AM
www.richardsimmons.com
 
2012-04-13 10:15:35 AM

JerkStore: I had one of the only truly jaw-dropping moments of my life when I learned that Ian McKellan was gay. Not that there's anything wrong with that, but of all the people who I would have suspected of being gay, he was most certainly NOT on the list.


Can you be more specific on why you were surprised? He's a well educated, well spoken, almost genteel mannered talented man who's career is based in artistic expression. When I heard he was gay, my reaction was, "Well, he's not flaming, but it doesn't surprise me."

Now, if Harrison Ford, Jason Statham, or Vin Diesel were to 'come out of the closet,' now that would surprise me.
 
2012-04-13 10:21:36 AM

brantgoose: No matter how much bad news I see about the agro-industry, there's always more bad news. You can't even trust "whole foods" to be natural and whole. No wonder the "organic", localvore and do-it-youself movements are coming on so strong. If you don't grow it yourself, you don't know what you are getting. You can't possibly learn enough to navigate a store with 100,000 different items for sale safely. The consumer is powerless before the sheer volume of information they'd need to make wise and safe choices.


Yeah. I'm about as square and un-hip as you can get, but I've been growing my own veggies and fruit (mostly peppers and tomatoes) for years now because a tasteless tomato the size of a grapefruit obviously can't be all the great for you. Luckily, I live in Texas where land is cheap, backyards big, and the soil easy to keep productive; not everyone has that luxury though.
 
2012-04-13 10:23:14 AM
Please don't try to paint me into a corner that I'm a homophobe, OK? My brother's gay, and I saw that coming LONG before Ian McKellan.

Are you implying that all gays are well-educated, well-spoken, and genteel mannered artists? Of course not.

Vin Diesel being gay would be a bigger shock, though, you're right about that.
 
2012-04-13 10:24:27 AM

dittybopper: Cythraul: I wonder if more wide spread CSA farms are possible solution the problems you've mentioned? I have no idea of the cost of an annual investment in a CSA farm. Couldn't possibly be affordable for someone such as I.

[i44.tinypic.com image 504x332]

What a CSA farm might look like.

I would think that just feeding, housing, and clothing the slaves alone would be a significant expense. Even with petroleum prices as high as they are, I'm thinking a tractor would be better.


Well, I'm not educated on the subject, but I imagine CSA farms still use some 'artificial' methods to increase their crop to a size that you wouldn't normally find pre-industrial era, such as pesticides. So CSA farm products may not be exactly like medieval produce, which could be a good thing.

With a CSA farm though, the steps of needing to produce goods that have a long shelf life, or produce that can be shipped effectively wouldn't be a problem. So a CSA farmer could at least get rid of those issues.
 
2012-04-13 10:27:17 AM

JerkStore: Please don't try to paint me into a corner that I'm a homophobe, OK? My brother's gay, and I saw that coming LONG before Ian McKellan.

Are you implying that all gays are well-educated, well-spoken, and genteel mannered artists? Of course not.

Vin Diesel being gay would be a bigger shock, though, you're right about that.


Wow, big jump to thinking I was calling you a homophobe.

I'm implying that most people are surprised when someone comes out of the closet that doesn't fit the gay stereotype, and are not surprised when that person does fit the stereotype.
 
2012-04-13 10:27:28 AM
hahaha nice subby
 
2012-04-13 10:28:02 AM

Cythraul: That statement makes me wonder if you were actually being serious in your post, or just having a laugh. I had no idea medieval peasants ate 'well.'


"Peasant" covered a pretty wide range of people, but their diet was certainly better than what we tend to think they ate, and because sugar was so rare, tooth decay wasn't such an issue. Of course, they didn't understand what "plaque" was, so they didn't brush their teeth either, which led to some rather horrendous outcomes for the unhygienic later in life.

Here's (new window) Terry Jones to explain in more detail (youtube link, btw).
 
2012-04-13 10:30:11 AM

Cythraul: dittybopper: Cythraul: I wonder if more wide spread CSA farms are possible solution the problems you've mentioned? I have no idea of the cost of an annual investment in a CSA farm. Couldn't possibly be affordable for someone such as I.

[i44.tinypic.com image 504x332]

What a CSA farm might look like.

I would think that just feeding, housing, and clothing the slaves alone would be a significant expense. Even with petroleum prices as high as they are, I'm thinking a tractor would be better.

Well, I'm not educated on the subject, but I imagine CSA farms still use some 'artificial' methods to increase their crop to a size that you wouldn't normally find pre-industrial era, such as pesticides. So CSA farm products may not be exactly like medieval produce, which could be a good thing.

With a CSA farm though, the steps of needing to produce goods that have a long shelf life, or produce that can be shipped effectively wouldn't be a problem. So a CSA farmer could at least get rid of those issues.


I could feel the wind of that one sailing over your head from here.

/Confederate States of America
//golf clap, dittybopper
 
2012-04-13 10:34:27 AM

Mose: Cythraul: dittybopper: Cythraul: I wonder if more wide spread CSA farms are possible solution the problems you've mentioned? I have no idea of the cost of an annual investment in a CSA farm. Couldn't possibly be affordable for someone such as I.

[i44.tinypic.com image 504x332]

What a CSA farm might look like.

I would think that just feeding, housing, and clothing the slaves alone would be a significant expense. Even with petroleum prices as high as they are, I'm thinking a tractor would be better.

Well, I'm not educated on the subject, but I imagine CSA farms still use some 'artificial' methods to increase their crop to a size that you wouldn't normally find pre-industrial era, such as pesticides. So CSA farm products may not be exactly like medieval produce, which could be a good thing.

With a CSA farm though, the steps of needing to produce goods that have a long shelf life, or produce that can be shipped effectively wouldn't be a problem. So a CSA farmer could at least get rid of those issues.

I could feel the wind of that one sailing over your head from here.

/Confederate States of America
//golf clap, dittybopper


Ah, didn't realize it was a southern plantation. Stupid me.

I thought it was one of these:

img.artknowledgenews.com
 
2012-04-13 10:34:47 AM

Cythraul: Well, I'm not educated on the subject, but I imagine CSA farms still use some 'artificial' methods to increase their crop to a size that you wouldn't normally find pre-industrial era, such as pesticides. So CSA farm products may not be exactly like medieval produce, which could be a good thing.


The CSA we used a couple years ago (look, I don't like greens okay? Please stop giving them to... Oh god. Just fill the trunk and let me go!) had what seemed like quite large yields. The things I noted were: in-house starts, newspaper and organic matter to prevent weeds, and milk powder to discourage bugs. There was about maybe 2 acres under plow, 50+ shares, and each share got... About 400 lbs of food they claim (and I believe it).

So... Do we need to use pesticides and other things to increase yield? Probably... But not as much as you might think. I can definitely see machinery for the labor-intensive stuff though!
 
2012-04-13 10:39:43 AM
They should celebrate with some sort of party, it just needs a catchy title.
 
2012-04-13 10:40:57 AM

Cythraul: Mose: Cythraul: dittybopper: Cythraul: I wonder if more wide spread CSA farms are possible solution the problems you've mentioned? I have no idea of the cost of an annual investment in a CSA farm. Couldn't possibly be affordable for someone such as I.

[i44.tinypic.com image 504x332]

What a CSA farm might look like.

I would think that just feeding, housing, and clothing the slaves alone would be a significant expense. Even with petroleum prices as high as they are, I'm thinking a tractor would be better.

Well, I'm not educated on the subject, but I imagine CSA farms still use some 'artificial' methods to increase their crop to a size that you wouldn't normally find pre-industrial era, such as pesticides. So CSA farm products may not be exactly like medieval produce, which could be a good thing.

With a CSA farm though, the steps of needing to produce goods that have a long shelf life, or produce that can be shipped effectively wouldn't be a problem. So a CSA farmer could at least get rid of those issues.

I could feel the wind of that one sailing over your head from here.

/Confederate States of America
//golf clap, dittybopper

Ah, didn't realize it was a southern plantation. Stupid me.

I thought it was one of these:

[img.artknowledgenews.com image 640x454]


Well, to be fair, the whole "feeding, housing, and clothing the slaves" should have been a clue.
 
2012-04-13 10:42:41 AM

Cythraul: Mose: Cythraul: dittybopper: Cythraul: I wonder if more wide spread CSA farms are possible solution the problems you've mentioned? I have no idea of the cost of an annual investment in a CSA farm. Couldn't possibly be affordable for someone such as I.

[i44.tinypic.com image 504x332]

What a CSA farm might look like.

I would think that just feeding, housing, and clothing the slaves alone would be a significant expense. Even with petroleum prices as high as they are, I'm thinking a tractor would be better.

Well, I'm not educated on the subject, but I imagine CSA farms still use some 'artificial' methods to increase their crop to a size that you wouldn't normally find pre-industrial era, such as pesticides. So CSA farm products may not be exactly like medieval produce, which could be a good thing.

With a CSA farm though, the steps of needing to produce goods that have a long shelf life, or produce that can be shipped effectively wouldn't be a problem. So a CSA farmer could at least get rid of those issues.

I could feel the wind of that one sailing over your head from here.

/Confederate States of America
//golf clap, dittybopper

Ah, didn't realize it was a southern plantation. Stupid me.

I thought it was one of these:

[img.artknowledgenews.com image 640x454]


Took me a second to get it at first too.

/engineer, can be very dense
 
2012-04-13 10:42:44 AM
dittybopper:Well, to be fair, the whole "feeding, housing, and clothing the slaves" should have been a clue.

Many medieval peasants were little more than slaves.
 
2012-04-13 10:56:55 AM
Ian McKellan gave a talk in El Lay once where he talked about how New Zealand put his picture on a postage stamp after "Lord of the Rings" was filmed there.

He said, "Now they have two old queens on their stamps."
 
2012-04-13 10:58:30 AM
I know no one gives a shiat, but I rarely get to show off my gardening skillz. So fark it.

Early radishes, mm...
lh3.googleusercontent.com

Hollyhock
lh4.googleusercontent.com

Peonies, roses
lh6.googleusercontent.com

100 year old rose bush
lh3.googleusercontent.com

Bridal veil
lh4.googleusercontent.com

i18.photobucket.com

i18.photobucket.com

Kill it with fire!
i18.photobucket.com
 
2012-04-13 11:01:48 AM

Mose: I know no one gives a shiat, but I rarely get to show off my gardening skillz. So fark it.

Early radishes, mm...
[lh3.googleusercontent.com image 640x480]


You make me so envious. I've got some good land and I just can't seem to grow things. This year I have a makeshift greenhouse with raised planters and it seems like shiat should just grow like crazy.

Remedial gardening lessons for me, I'm afraid... :)
 
2012-04-13 11:06:19 AM

Mose: I know no one gives a shiat, but I rarely get to show off my gardening skillz. So fark it.


I wish I could garden. Apartment living sucks.
 
2012-04-13 11:08:34 AM
I just bought a house that has a nice sunny, east facing backyard. I'm hoping to get some tomatoes and peppers planted shortly after I move in at the end of April. I love having fresh veggies, and frankly, the more backyard I occupy with veggies, or even eventually berry bushes, the happier I'll be. Less yard to mow, yaaaay!

/it's a townhouse, so it's already only about 3 swipes with a mower anyway
 
2012-04-13 11:09:38 AM
Ian, will you bring some lemons?
 
2012-04-13 11:10:05 AM

brantgoose: But seriously, folks.

I have read many times that today's corporate fruit and vegetables aren't what they were. For example, the factoid that oranges had eight times more vitamin C in them in the 1950s than they do today.

Part of the problem is forcing fruits and vegetables with too much water, growing them too fast, dying them and waxing them and selling them before their time, still unripe. This is particularly obnoxious with fruit and vegetables that do not ripen after they are picked--you get hard, tasteless, indigestible "food" that costs more and has less nutritional value.

But, as this article points out, the problem isn't just production, shipping, display, etc. (these are mostly matters of time--vegetables and fruit can lose half of their flavour and food value in 24 hours after picking), but also of breeding. When you breed for cosmetic or shelf-life advantages, you lose flavour and scent and nutrition. Plants are living things and the energy they devote to one job they can not devote to other jobs.

Our food is literally being turned into beautiful but tasteless, food valueless simulacra. Wax fruit. Plastic vegetables. Plaster of paris pastries.

Adulteration and shipping have long been problems but much of today's produce is instrinsically less valuable due to loss of bio-diversity, forcing of growth times, unripeness, artificial enhancement, etc.

No matter how much bad news I see about the agro-industry, there's always more bad news. You can't even trust "whole foods" to be natural and whole. No wonder the "organic", localvore and do-it-youself movements are coming on so strong. If you don't grow it yourself, you don't know what you are getting. You can't possibly learn enough to navigate a store with 100,000 different items for sale safely. The consumer is powerless before the sheer volume of information they'd need to make wise and safe choices.

Those who are rich enough to buy artisinal food from heirloom farmers are in luck. They can eat as well as medieval peasants. But the rest of us are literally eating fraudulent food. It claims to be what it is not, like a heavily made-up aging prostitute who's literally not as fresh and virginal as she appears.


What farmers market do you go to that has fresh and virginal prostitutes. Anyway, the depreciation on them is brutal, and I never trust a first run model, there are always issues that get worked out as experience is gained and paid by early adopter suckers.

And while I'm sure you get results, I just can't condone a grow your own approach.
 
2012-04-13 11:13:05 AM

This text is now purple: brantgoose: Those who are rich enough to buy artisinal food from heirloom farmers are in luck. They can eat as well as medieval peasants.

Tomatoes weren't introduced to Europe until 1544 (they're a new World fruit). They weren't eaten until the 1650s, because as a nightshade, they were presumed to be poisonous (and the leaves are).

So medieval peasants didn't eat tomatoes at all.


1. There were people in the "New World", too.
2. Many lived an agrarian life similar to that of the European peasant.
3. They ate tomatoes.
4. All these things were true prior to 1544.
 
2012-04-13 11:13:22 AM
outstanding. my favorite of the week.
 
2012-04-13 11:14:05 AM

Cythraul: Now, if Harrison Ford, Jason Statham, or Vin Diesel were to 'come out of the closet,' now that would surprise me.


Not me. I know stuff.
 
2012-04-13 11:14:26 AM

Cythraul: Mose: I know no one gives a shiat, but I rarely get to show off my gardening skillz. So fark it.

I wish I could garden. Apartment living sucks.


I'm closing on my first house at the end of the month. I'm looking forward to having space for a small vegetable garden and maybe some fruit trees.
 
2012-04-13 11:24:44 AM

Cythraul: When I heard he was gay, my reaction was, "Well, he's not flaming, but it doesn't surprise me."


Not only is he not flaming, according to Peter Jackson's LOTR extended version, he is actually flame-retardant.
 
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