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(Huffington Post)   One in five adults have read an e-book. Other four still awaiting release of the e-movie   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 81
    More: Interesting, e-books  
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726 clicks; posted to Geek » on 10 Apr 2012 at 9:28 AM (3 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-04-10 08:21:56 AM  
One in five adults have read an e-book.

More likely.
 
2012-04-10 08:29:28 AM  
That's very fascinating to me. I read a lot myself. Some people think I'm too intellectual. But I think reading is a fabulous way to spend your spare time. I also play racketball.
 
2012-04-10 09:32:12 AM  
Aren't all movies (at least those released in the First World) "e-movies" already? Nothing is released on analog formats anymore, far as I know.
 
2012-04-10 09:32:17 AM  
TFA: 19% of respondents aged 16 and over said that they hadn't read a single book in any format, over the previous 12 months

thisiswhywecanthavenicethings.jpg

Seriously? If I had any faith left in this country, this would not do it any favors.
 
2012-04-10 09:34:46 AM  

MuonNeutrino: TFA: 19% of respondents aged 16 and over said that they hadn't read a single book in any format, over the previous 12 months

thisiswhywecanthavenicethings.jpg

Seriously? If I had any faith left in this country, this would not do it any favors.


Wanna make it worse? The other 81% would say The Twilight series.
 
2012-04-10 09:35:16 AM  
I'm try to read "The Gods of Mars" on Kindle. I must say I am having a hard time liking the experience. It feels like each page is just paragraph length and I spend more time turning pages than reading. My daughter has the Kindle Fire, which is a bit bigger and not quite so awkward, but I'm not feeling it. There are features that I like, but I guess I just like a real book.
 
2012-04-10 09:37:42 AM  
Mrs. Samurai was thinking about buying me a kindle for Christmas, but I looked at my reading list and everything was either unavailable or more expensive in e-format than on paper.
 
2012-04-10 09:40:47 AM  

DarnoKonrad: That's very fascinating to me. I read a lot myself. Some people think I'm too intellectual. But I think reading is a fabulous way to spend your spare time. I also play racketball.


Thanks for you insight Ms. Melnin.
 
2012-04-10 09:48:24 AM  
The only reason I won't buy an e-book is simply because you don't really "own" those books. Those books are technically leased to you so that you can read them, but if the publisher/merchant deems it necessary to revoke those books they can and people can't really do much about it.

/This of course is the case for people who actually buy e-books.
 
2012-04-10 09:57:06 AM  
If manuals and things like that count as ebooks, then yes, I have, but I have no desire to read for pleasure with an ebook. I like the feel of paper of a real book, or the ability to do other things while listening to an audio book.

Plus I can get real books from the library for free.
 
2012-04-10 10:00:42 AM  

LegacyDL: The only reason I won't buy an e-book is simply because you don't really "own" those books. Those books are technically leased to you so that you can read them, but if the publisher/merchant deems it necessary to revoke those books they can and people can't really do much about it.

/This of course is the case for people who actually buy e-books.


I was originally against buying eBooks for the same reason, then I learned how trivial it was to strip the DRM(especially if you use Calibre and have the right plugins installed) and backup them up.
 
2012-04-10 10:02:13 AM  

LegacyDL: The only reason I won't buy an e-book is simply because you don't really "own" those books. Those books are technically leased to you so that you can read them, but if the publisher/merchant deems it necessary to revoke those books they can and people can't really do much about it.

/This of course is the case for people who actually buy e-books.


All the people I know with serious e-book habits (a couple of whom who spend ~$150-200 a month on them) habitually de-DRM their purchased books the instant they get them and store them like they do other digital files they want to keep. And, yes, they do actually buy them and don't generally distribute them (certainly no more than they loan out paperbacks).
 
2012-04-10 10:03:45 AM  

ChimpMitten: If manuals and things like that count as ebooks, then yes, I have, but I have no desire to read for pleasure with an ebook. I like the feel of paper of a real book, or the ability to do other things while listening to an audio book.

Plus I can get real books from the library for free.


I'm just the opposite in my ebook/dead tree format preferences. I like my manual and reference books in electronic form, so I can more easily skim through or skip around, but prefer my pleasure reading on my Nook since it's easeier to handle than a real book, often lighter, and I always have my whole library with me.
 
2012-04-10 10:04:18 AM  
I may be no snob. But I love my kindle. Doesn't matter if my book is 10 pages or 1500 pages. It packs nicely and is carried easily. I can also carry several books at once so I can easily read 2-3 at a time anywhere I go.

Plus with a kindle account, I can read those books on my ipad or iphone.
 
2012-04-10 10:07:45 AM  
LittleSmitty: I'm try to read "The Gods of Mars" on Kindle. I must say I am having a hard time liking the experience. It feels like each page is just paragraph length and I spend more time turning pages than reading.

Adjust the font size?

// the default was too big for me

// it's basically the size of a paperback book, so the font size should reflect that
 
2012-04-10 10:15:45 AM  
I love e-books. My local library has a pretty good selection of stuff available for download. I'm working my way through the books on the NPR list of 100 best sci-fi books, and so far they've had most of the ones I've tried to find available. They only have a couple copies of each title to check out, so you have to place a hold on a lot of them, but that's really only an issue with the newer stuff. The game of thrones books take a while to get, but I just finished Dune and am on Starship Troopers right now. Didn't have to wait at all for those. I also have a Frommers travel guide checked out. That one doesn't work as well as an e-book with the pictures, but that may just be because I'm using my phone instead of an e-reader to view it. I imagine a kindle or a nook could handle it better than a phone.
 
2012-04-10 10:30:23 AM  
In before all of the people who wax rhapsodic over the smell of paper books.
 
2012-04-10 10:38:19 AM  

LittleSmitty: I must say I am having a hard time liking the experience. It feels like each page is just paragraph length and I spend more time turning pages than reading.


You can adjust the font size to whatever you like. If you prefer smaller text so that you spend more time on a page, it's easy enough to do.
 
2012-04-10 10:41:03 AM  
My issue is the prices I have seen for the eBooks have been MORE expensive than the same paperback version of the book. Shouldn't they cost less than an actual dead tree product? Also why would I need to carry my whole library around at the same time. I seldom find myself reading more than one book at once.

/old fuddy duddy
 
2012-04-10 10:46:05 AM  
After using my e-reader, holding a regular book feels like a chore. Stupid, I know.
It's just so damn light and convenient to read books (especially longer novels) on an e-reader.
 
2012-04-10 10:47:41 AM  

MuonNeutrino: thisiswhywecanthavenicethings.jpg

Seriously? If I had any faith left in this country, this would not do it any favors.


I'm surprised it's that high. I would have been very, very confident in taking the under at 80%.

I like my Kindle. I thought I'd prefer the paper copy but the Kindle is really convenient, and there's a huge backlog of those classics I never read in the free to $2 range available. It also doesn't make me sneeze.
 
2012-04-10 10:53:47 AM  

UNC_Samurai: Mrs. Samurai was thinking about buying me a kindle for Christmas, but I looked at my reading list and everything was either unavailable or more expensive in e-format than on paper.


This is the main reason I haven't taken to e-books yet, however Instapaper and my RSS feeds are wonderfully suited to my ipad. If you haven't yet, Instapaper or any of those read it later programs that capture articles for offline reading are perfect.
 
2012-04-10 10:53:57 AM  
I just think it's funny that the video they included featured the eReader app from Peanut Press, which hasn't been updated since 2009 and was bought out and phased out by Barnes & Noble.

It was a really nice app before the explosion of epub as a standard.

Nice way to stay on top of technology in a technology related article.
 
2012-04-10 11:03:39 AM  
I read Axe Cop. Does that count?
 
2012-04-10 11:05:23 AM  

you have pee hands: and there's a huge backlog of those classics I never read in the free to $2 range available.


This is exactly why I just bought a Kindle. There are way too many of those classics that I'm ashamed to have never read, and that I never would have tracked down a paper copy in order to read.
 
2012-04-10 11:06:06 AM  
I'm always curious as to why people care so much about whether other people read for pleasure or not. I read almost every day, but I really couldn't care less whether others share that particular hobby with me or not.
 
2012-04-10 11:09:43 AM  

Sangi: My issue is the prices I have seen for the eBooks have been MORE expensive than the same paperback version of the book. Shouldn't they cost less than an actual dead tree product? Also why would I need to carry my whole library around at the same time. I seldom find myself reading more than one book at once.

/old fuddy duddy


In part why I don't have an ereader. For the cost of the thing I can get a ton of paperbacks, and never have to charge them or dick with DRM. Let alone then having to obtain the books I wanted to read anyway usually for more money.

Of course I usually just read cheap schlocky fiction fantasy that I buy from a half price books.

I do have to ask why some people are making a big deal out of people not reading; most people have basic (high school) literate ability. That's enough. You can't pretend the vast majority of readers are thumbing through heavy philosophy and science books anyway. They're reading the printed equivalent to dramas or other tv shows. It's just waxing romantic to view it as anything else. It's no more challenging or informative than an episode of 2 and a half men.
 
2012-04-10 11:09:44 AM  
I'm a book reader.

I just don't find e-book that great a thing...not the same curled up in bed with one.

They are good for out-of-print books,
but I tend to just read those on my laptop.
 
2012-04-10 11:17:06 AM  
I know at some point I'll have no choice but to buy an e-reader. But book stores are 1 of the few stores I actually enjoy going to. E-readers will obviously eventually run them out of business, but until that day comes I'm going to continue buying books.
 
2012-04-10 11:25:24 AM  
I've never read an e-book. Don't plan to. Still love paper.
 
2012-04-10 11:30:08 AM  

ChimpMitten: I like the feel of paper of a real book,


I like the fact that I can put a real book up on the shelf, and when I pull it down 30 or 40 years later to read it, I don't have to worry about what format it is in, or what media it resides on.
 
2012-04-10 11:33:32 AM  
Calibre is wonderful.
 
2012-04-10 11:55:40 AM  
Using Moon Reader on Droid phone since the end of last year. Read 4-5 books on it since. I'm now reading Fire Upon the Deep by Vernor Vinge.
 
2012-04-10 11:56:37 AM  

LittleSmitty: I'm try to read "The Gods of Mars" on Kindle. I must say I am having a hard time liking the experience


I don't like e-Ink displays because page refreshes take a measurable amount of time. I've heard that regular Kindle users eventually get to a point where they can time the page flip/screen refresh so that their reading is uninterrupted, but I never got to that point. I love reading ebooks, but I think the experience is better on a small but high-resolution screen.ebooks generally aren't enhanced by color displays andof course e-ink is better from a display quality standpoint than any LCD I'm aware of, but quick refreshes and high resolution are also a big factor in readability.

Already Disturbed: Calibre is wonderful.


It really, really is. Rarely does a software package so completely encompass all of my OCD organization tendencies all at once, but then there's Calibre, which indulges all of them and more.
 
2012-04-10 12:01:50 PM  
I was 50/50 on me Kindle Fire/Books I still read some paper books, but my problem is my wife is also an avid reader. and as we can not share the device at the same time, it makes it a bit hard for us when we like the same series. I've since bought her a kindle as well, and now all new release that i'm itching for are purchased as books, everything else is Ebooks.
 
2012-04-10 12:32:59 PM  
Since getting a Kindle my reading is probably up 200%. There are so many old classic books that I never read which are available for free in ebook form. I also check out books from the Amazon Prime kindle lenders library. That's how I was first introduced to the Hunger Games and I'm currently reading The Last Lecture. I had to put that one down though, since a really good friends father just passed away from cancer and its too real right now to read without tearing up.
 
2012-04-10 12:33:50 PM  
I've forbidden my wife to buy me two specific gadgets: an e-book reader and a fondle-slab phone. I spent the whole work day on my computer and I HATE touch screens.
 
2012-04-10 12:42:53 PM  
I LOVE my Sony Reader. The thing I love most about it is the fact that you don't have to buy ebooks exclusively from the Sony Store as you do (or used to do?) from Amazon with the Kindle. The Reader can handle most digital documents from .pdf, .doc, .txt, html, .epub, etc. I read a lot of research papers, scientific journals, news articles and I'm also a writer, so I load a bunch of stuff into my Reader, not just books. Most of my books are from the Public Domain anyways, so they are FREE. You still have to pay a publisher for a print copy of a public domain book, so thats a perk for me.

I like being able to change the font size too since I have bad eyesight, and I like the fact my reader is made of aluminum and not plastic (I hate the newer Readers for that reason). The page refresh times are not a bother for me, and I can flip through pages lightning fast by just keeping my finger on the screen.
 
2012-04-10 12:55:10 PM  
It's one thing if you love the feel/smell/whatever of physical books, and I have nothing to say about that.

But man, there are some real technological neophytes/luddites in this thread.

dittybopper: I like the fact that I can put a real book up on the shelf, and when I pull it down 30 or 40 years later to read it, I don't have to worry about what format it is in, or what media it resides on.

There is software that can convert media to different formats, ex Calibre. At the end of the day, a book is just a stream of text.

ASCII has been around for over four decades and it's still readable on basically anything.

There's never really any trouble with reading older data formats (I guarantee that there's a converter somewhere). It's old media that's an issue (which is not an issue either if you actually keep up with digital media, IE, hard drives are going to be on their way out as SSD drives take over, so at some point, you should be copying stuff from your regular hard disks over to a SSD).

likefunbutnot: I don't like e-Ink displays because page refreshes take a measurable amount of time.

It's not really any slower than turning a physical page.

Seriously, they're complaining that this

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HL-xV6Q68Ew

Is too slow.

kroonermanblack: In part why I don't have an ereader. For the cost of the thing I can get a ton of paperbacks, and never have to charge them or dick with DRM

E-ink readers have to be charged after a certain amount of page turns (typically, thousands of page turns).

In my case, this means that about once a month, I hook my kindle up to a USB port overnight and it's good for another month.

DRM sucks in any form, but they've all been broken.

// In my case, DRM isn't even an issue because I'm currently working my way through a bunch of Project Gutenberg books.

// For me, the convenience of an e-book reader far outweighs any disadvantages (such as charging, etc).

// Still have some nice books displayed on my shelf. But they basically just sit there, on my shelf.
 
2012-04-10 01:09:23 PM  
One in five adults have read an Ebook has enough free time to read.

/closer to the truth.
 
2012-04-10 01:19:55 PM  

lordargent: It's one thing if you love the feel/smell/whatever of physical books, and I have nothing to say about that.

But man, there are some real technological neophytes/luddites in this thread.

dittybopper: I like the fact that I can put a real book up on the shelf, and when I pull it down 30 or 40 years later to read it, I don't have to worry about what format it is in, or what media it resides on.

There is software that can convert media to different formats, ex Calibre. At the end of the day, a book is just a stream of text.

ASCII has been around for over four decades and it's still readable on basically anything.

There's never really any trouble with reading older data formats (I guarantee that there's a converter somewhere). It's old media that's an issue (which is not an issue either if you actually keep up with digital media, IE, hard drives are going to be on their way out as SSD drives take over, so at some point, you should be copying stuff from your regular hard disks over to a SSD).

likefunbutnot: I don't like e-Ink displays because page refreshes take a measurable amount of time.

It's not really any slower than turning a physical page.

Seriously, they're complaining that this

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HL-xV6Q68Ew

Is too slow.

kroonermanblack: In part why I don't have an ereader. For the cost of the thing I can get a ton of paperbacks, and never have to charge them or dick with DRM

E-ink readers have to be charged after a certain amount of page turns (typically, thousands of page turns).

In my case, this means that about once a month, I hook my kindle up to a USB port overnight and it's good for another month.

DRM sucks in any form, but they've all been broken.

// In my case, DRM isn't even an issue because I'm currently working my way through a bunch of Project Gutenberg books.

// For me, the convenience of an e-book reader far outweighs any disadvantages (such as charging, etc).

// Still have some nice books displayed on my shelf. But they basically just sit there, on my shelf.


You like what you like. It's not realistically measurable in any fashion to say your device is better.

Disliking a device for weaknesses in its design which were not present in the original, while not wanting, let alone needing, the improvements it offers, is not Luddite. It's simply not rampant consumerism.

The e reader offers me nothing. It has considerable costs above those of paperbacks, considerable hassle and effort, more risk of both theft, breakage, and content loss. And yes, the readers I've tried refresh appreciably slower than a page turn (bear in mind most people prime thier turn when they get near the end so it's 'preloaded').

Notice I said it offers ME nothing. If I had an hour commute on a train I might say otherwise. But I don't. And after examining the costs and the benefits of the device, there is little to no benefit for me.
 
2012-04-10 01:42:04 PM  
There is a school of thought that even though many love (and I personally) the tactile qualities of books that we are moving into an age where our perception and frame of reference to reading is not wholly rooted in a physical paper-based form. I mean we're in the age we can look at the world through satellites on our phones. What does that mean to our perception of the world?

This whole "luddite" argument against the ebook is fleeting, at best. It is an argument that is only debated by anyone over 25. The younger audiences and the next generations grow up in certain environments and learn from them.

Face it, the book is dead, it is only a matter of how long can we hold onto the relics of that culture for selfish reasons? I mean, I hate the skeuomorphic qualities of current ebooks that they have to mimic pages. It's not a book, let's not be hampered by the things that make a book a book when you're using an internet device.

And conversely, those things that make a book (physicality, touch, texture) let's emphasize and celebrate those things in books that readers can't do.
 
2012-04-10 01:59:51 PM  

ChimpMitten: If manuals and things like that count as ebooks, then yes, I have, but I have no desire to read for pleasure with an ebook. I like the feel of paper of a real book, or the ability to do other things while listening to an audio book.

Plus I can get real books from the library for free.


FWIW, many ebook readers can do the audio books, and libraries are starting to offer time limited "borrowing" of their ebook collections, which are growing. (At least around here, Vancouver, BC)

likefunbutnot: LittleSmitty: I'm try to read "The Gods of Mars" on Kindle. I must say I am having a hard time liking the experience

I don't like e-Ink displays because page refreshes take a measurable amount of time. I've heard that regular Kindle users eventually get to a point where they can time the page flip/screen refresh so that their reading is uninterrupted, but I never got to that point. I love reading ebooks, but I think the experience is better on a small but high-resolution screen.ebooks generally aren't enhanced by color displays andof course e-ink is better from a display quality standpoint than any LCD I'm aware of, but quick refreshes and high resolution are also a big factor in readability.


I have the Sony Reader released last year, and I noticed the same thing, but it only seemed to happen with PDF files. Sometimes it would take 3 seconds or so to flip a page. Made worse by the fact that the reader software sucks at paginating the PDF files, and sometimes the next page would have just one line, one word or even be blank. ePub files basically switch as fast as the screen allows, and are alot better with the flow and layout.
 
2012-04-10 02:09:21 PM  
As long as used and bargain are cheaper, that's what I'm sticking with.
 
2012-04-10 02:10:03 PM  
kroonermanblack: The e reader offers me nothing. It has considerable costs above those of paperbacks, considerable hassle and effort, more risk of both theft, breakage, and content loss. And yes, the readers I've tried refresh appreciably slower than a page turn (bear in mind most people prime thier turn when they get near the end so it's 'preloaded').

I quoted you on three specific things.

1) Cost: The cheapest kindle is $79, I had a huge book habit myself and I wasn't able to buy "a ton of paperbacks" for that (but I liked my books fresh and new).

2) Charging: Complaining about having to periodically charge a device whose battery life is measured in weeks strikes me as being a bit of a luddite. So I agree to disagree here.

3) DRM: as mentioned, already cracked and not an issue, and there's plenty of non DRM stuff to read.

I didn't mention anything to you about page turn speed. But FWIW, older devices did have slower screens, but that hasn't been true for years (at least with regards to the mainstream readers). The pages on my kindle refresh faster than I could have ever turned a physical book.

Now granted, an e-book reader isn't for everyone, but the 'weaknesses in its design' that you mention are hardly mentionable (and it's not like physical books don't come with their own cadre of disadvantages). But don't worry though, I totally understand how you feel because I feel the same way about smart phones and will proudly proclaim myself as a smart phone luddite.
 
2012-04-10 02:10:15 PM  
I love my kindles because they're just so damn convenient! No matter how many pages, how big, or how heavy a book may be it's all the same on the kindle. I can read/turn pages with one hand and be in whatever position I want (sitting up, laying down, fapping, etc...)

The page-turn speed on the larger kindle (DXG) is slightly slower than an actual book would be, but the smaller kindles are faster than one could naturally turn a page.
 
2012-04-10 02:11:19 PM  

DarnoKonrad: That's very fascinating to me. I read a lot myself. Some people think I'm too intellectual. But I think reading is a fabulous way to spend your spare time. I also play racketball.


I collect spores, mold, and fungus.
 
2012-04-10 02:20:50 PM  
As a lifelong reader who still has a wall-length bookcase filled with a few thousand books, I love my e-readers (Kindle app on a variety of devices). I have at least 30 different books on my main device (rooted Nook Color), and yes, at any given time, I'm reading at least 10 of them (not simultaneously, duh). I have an hour of train travel each day to/from the office, and I never have to take more than just the Nook.

As I replace the paper books with e-versions, I plan on selling most of them to used book stores, or even to Amazon so they can resell them.
 
2012-04-10 02:33:08 PM  
Spent college working in a rare book collection -- believe me, I love books, or tomes, greatly leathery tomes.

But my book reading had tailed off to zero as it was always a pain to have a book around to fit my mood. Past year with a Xoom running the Kindle app reversed that -- now I can indulge my fickle tastes quickly, easily, and relatively cheaply.

If you are unsure about ebooks, start with Kindle Fire and Amazon Prime. Pretty absurd combo for media consumption.
 
2012-04-10 02:42:40 PM  

lordargent: dittybopper: I like the fact that I can put a real book up on the shelf, and when I pull it down 30 or 40 years later to read it, I don't have to worry about what format it is in, or what media it resides on.

There is software that can convert media to different formats, ex Calibre. At the end of the day, a book is just a stream of text.

ASCII has been around for over four decades and it's still readable on basically anything.

There's never really any trouble with reading older data formats (I guarantee that there's a converter somewhere). It's old media that's an issue (which is not an issue either if you actually keep up with digital media, IE, hard drives are going to be on their way out as SSD drives take over, so at some point, you should be copying stuff from your regular hard disks over to a SSD).


Toe-may-toe, toe-mah-toe.

I'm a programmer/analyst. Sitting on my shelf right above my head in my office, I have two things: A paperback copy of Frederick Brook's "The Mythical Man-Month", and an 8" floppy disk that according to the label, has some source code on it.

Both are from 1982.

Guess which one I can still read. Go ahead. Guess.

What is the point of an archive if you periodically have to update the format or media it is one so that it remains readable? The strength of a printed copy is that it doesn't require any equipment, nor periodic conversion or transfer to a new device, in order to remain readable. Short of physical destruction, that data is going outlast anything electronic.

I'd point out that a large part of what I do is write software to shuffle data between different systems. I'm fundamentally aware of the issues, because I've been doing it professionally for almost 2 decades now, and informally for going on 30 years.
 
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