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(Some Guy)   Open Letter To My Son's Teacher And Principal   (mushroomprinting.com ) divider line
    More: Spiffy, DARE, Montessori school, teachers, elementary schools  
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34788 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Apr 2012 at 8:54 AM (4 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-04-10 02:07:53 PM  

SkunkWerks: Babwa Wawa: I don't see any evidence at all that this is a shiatty teacher

The corollary also seems to be true, IMO.

As it's been pointed out, this is but one side of the story.


There's plenty of evidence that this is a parent who believes that learning is something that happens only in schools. In fact, that explains the outrage s/he feels about perceived abrogation of responsibility on the part of the teacher and principal.
 
2012-04-10 02:08:56 PM  

Razzed:

Maybe some parents realise that social interaction is not mutually exclusive with school attendance. It's fairly easy to set up play time with other families, or enroll your kids in sports programs or art classes, and then send them to camp in the summer.

Do you really think that every important social interaction you ever had as a child happened at the school you attended?

Just wondering, since I don't even think that most of my important social interactions happened at school.


To your question: Yes if you are including the friends that I made whille being in said school that I probably wouldn't of had longer contact with than an hour or so here and there from "play dates". Play dates are like the military "mandatory fun" times that most people dread and have fun when you do it but afterward you are glad it is over.
 
2012-04-10 02:12:53 PM  
You know it's entirely possible that the teacher and principle are terrible. The teacher should be able to go over something a second time if a student asks. She also claims that the teacher calls the child a failure, possible in front of other kids. That's complete bullshiat. So yeah, the mom is guilty of not picking up the slack when the teacher fails to teach, but I doubt it's one sided.
 
2012-04-10 02:16:48 PM  
TNel:
cough...BS... cough. There may be 1 or 2 per district that will put in that kind of time, but majority are in for 8 hours or less then out. Workshops usually are for a few days during the summer that you are getting paid to have off, thankless parents.... I'll raise that to thankless teachers for all the work the support staff does for them and then the teachers have the audacity to complain to the custodians that worked all summer for $9 an hour that moved all of their desks into the hall, stripped the wax and put new wax down and moved all the stuff back in but didn't put the desks back exactly the way they like it.


Your experience must be wholly unlike my own. Every success in my life has sprung forth from a tireless educator, precisely molding me in the blazing furnaces of public education. I have not known a mediocre teacher. Were there any, I am doubtless the flames would consume them.
 
2012-04-10 02:18:40 PM  

Mistress Jedana: So, I'll do my job and you do yours, and between us, we will produce a man,


In just seven days?
i141.photobucket.com
 
2012-04-10 02:31:21 PM  
Open Letter to a Landlord:

Now you can tear a building down
But you can't erase a memory
These houses may look all run down
But they have a value you can't see

...
 
2012-04-10 02:35:58 PM  

Frederick: That read like "my kid sucks at school -it's the teachers fault".

Considering this was elementary school, I sense the problem resides at home more than at school.


Ok, I thought it was just me.

I love all the "you should go over it again and again with him, review his blah, blah,blah..." like he is the only kid in class.
 
2012-04-10 02:36:43 PM  

The Jami Turman Fan Club: Thunderpipes: Never even heard of a home schooled child. Who would want to, even if they didn't have to work? No way a kid can be home schooled and not be screwed up socially.

So, I take it you weren't home schooled, and look at how you turned out. I guess going to school doesn't keep you from being screwed up socially.


Fark is not social. I have a great life. I would not WANT to get along with a bunch of dudes who like fat chicks and think people should not have to work. At every party I have ever been to, you guys are that guy, the one nobody likes but showed up any way. Blah.
 
2012-04-10 02:43:18 PM  

Thunderpipes: . At every party I have ever been to, you guys are that guy, the one nobody likes but showed up any way. Blah.


"You guys" as in everyone else on Fark except you right.
 
2012-04-10 02:49:15 PM  
There are places like what the author wrote about in his letter. It's called PRIVATE SCHOOL.
 
2012-04-10 02:49:30 PM  

TNel: Thunderpipes: . At every party I have ever been to, you guys are that guy, the one nobody likes but showed up any way. Blah.

"You guys" as in everyone else on Fark except you right.


The "i am better than all other fark posters" are my favorite kind.
 
2012-04-10 02:56:43 PM  

Headso: TNel: Thunderpipes: . At every party I have ever been to, you guys are that guy, the one nobody likes but showed up any way. Blah.

"You guys" as in everyone else on Fark except you right.

The "i am better than all other fark posters" are my favorite kind.


Sounds like the I'm not gay you gave me a BJ.

Cindy Campbell: I thought you loved me.
Bobby: Oh, I did, baby, I did. But being in abstinence makes you wonder new things about yourself. That's right Cindy, I'm gay. And in case you haven't noticed, so is Ray.
Ray: What? I ain't gay!
Bobby: What are you talking about? You took me to that club.
Ray: So? They play good music.
Bobby: What about our trip to San Francisco?
Ray: I wanted to go shopping.
Bobby: [on the verge of tears] But... you made love to me.
Ray: First of all, you sucked my...
Bobby: Whatever!
 
2012-04-10 02:59:01 PM  
Your kid sounds like an idiot, and your inability to write a formal letter without constant use of profanity pretty much tells me where he got it from.
 
2012-04-10 03:00:10 PM  

SkunkWerks: mojo moon: It warms the cockles of my heart to know that no Farker or their child ever got a lemon teacher.

Warms mine too.

Though, to be honest, what we're really reading here is 50% of a he-said/she-said. As one person pointed out somewhere back on page one, there's no real context offered for this rant.


Yup, we just don't know enough to judge this one properly.


It is funny though how so many are so quick to lay 100% of the blame on the parent. While I don't agree that it is all on the teacher to raise and educate a child, you have to admit, if your kid is like most, then that little loinspawn spends anywhere up to half of his or her waking day with this individual.

Welcome to Fark, Where Parents Are Always WrongTM
 
2012-04-10 03:01:57 PM  

melopene:

"I have asked you, I don't even know how many times, to double check his planner and sign it so that I know what should be done."

Unless the kid has an ILP, not her job. Do you have any idea how much BS K-12 teachers deal with in a single day?


I know that it IS the job of teachers at the high school level.

It helps the kids.

It helps the parents know what the kid should be doing so they can do their part to get the kid on track.
 
2012-04-10 03:04:03 PM  
Did anyone catch in the comments where the mother admitted her third grade son is eleven years old? Shouldn't you been in 6th grade by then?
 
2012-04-10 03:04:16 PM  

TravisBickle62: Some kids are just dumb


Well, the world needs ditch diggers, too.
 
2012-04-10 03:05:42 PM  

MC O'Brien: Did anyone catch in the comments where the mother admitted her third grade son is eleven years old? Shouldn't you been in 6th grade by then?


Maybe but I bet he absolutely dominates in gym class!
 
2012-04-10 03:13:23 PM  
I am a teacher so I am getting a kick out of these replies.

Damn their precious little snowflake isn't getting 100% of the teacher's time and the principal has to discipline your child because he is probably the biggest bully in the school and comes home and mopes cause he has no friends?

To the parent: F off. I have other students who need my time too.
 
2012-04-10 03:16:34 PM  

AliceInWonderland: I am a teacher so I am getting a kick out of these replies.

Damn their precious little snowflake isn't getting 100% of the teacher's time and the principal has to discipline your child because he is probably the biggest bully in the school and comes home and mopes cause he has no friends?

To the parent: F off. I have other students who need my time too.


Other students that might make something of themselves.
 
2012-04-10 03:22:20 PM  

TNel: cough...BS... cough. There may be 1 or 2 per district that will put in that kind of time, but majority are in for 8 hours or less then out. Workshops usually are for a few days during the summer that you are getting paid to have off, thankless parents.... I'll raise that to thankless teachers for all the work the support staff does for them and then the teachers have the audacity to complain to the custodians that worked all summer for $9 an hour that moved all of their desks into the hall, stripped the wax and put new wax down and moved all the stuff back in but didn't put the desks back exactly the way they like it.



This is satire, right?
 
2012-04-10 03:23:16 PM  
I know maybe 3 things about home schooling. But even one of those is that they specifically have contact with other home schoolers and arrange things to get extra social engagement for their children.
 
2012-04-10 03:31:05 PM  

SkunkWerks: Razzed: TNel: Thunderpipes:

Never even heard of a home schooled child. Who would want to, even if they didn't have to work? No way a kid can be home schooled and not be screwed up socially.

Kids need that social interaction I have no idea why someone would do that to their own. 2 of my kids are in pre school and they love going to school, they learn a ton and they have soo much fun there, that they can't wait for "big boy school".

Maybe some parents realise that social interaction is not mutually exclusive with school attendance. It's fairly easy to set up play time with other families, or enroll your kids in sports programs or art classes, and then send them to camp in the summer.

Do you really think that every important social interaction you ever had as a child happened at the school you attended?

Just wondering, since I don't even think that most of my important social interactions happened at school.

I don't think the issue is necessarily with social interaction. It's to do with the typical motive behind homeschooling- as it seems to occur in many cases.

I've heard talk of helicopter parents in this thread. I've met unfortunate home-schoolees whose parents didn't want their kiddies learning about the world sans-religion. I've met others who were home-schooled because mommy and/or daddy couldn't bear to let junior our in the real world.

Either way, the motive typically is to shelter the child from something, and it's a theory that is- in my opinion- the antithesis of educating a child.

The problem really isn't anything to do with home-schooling in and of itself- indeed I imagine that some children (albeit a rare few) are taught in this way out of a genuine desire to enrich them intellectually and make out better in the deal than many public-schooled children. The problem with home-schooling is really to do with who is doing the schooling and why.


I can completely agree with that. I'm not trying to say that homeschooling is a perfect institution. There are pros and cons to the idea, just like any other, and quite honestly, it simply doesn't work for a lot of people. I'm just sick of people trotting out the tired line of "No social interaction WTF!" as though it's actually impossible for children to socialise unless they attend a regular school.

As you noted, a child's lack of socialisation has much more to do with the decisions of its parents, it's certainly not an issue that is inherent to being homeschooled.
 
2012-04-10 03:34:12 PM  

dready zim: I_Am_Weasel: miss diminutive: He should be wanting to learn. I hate that you have taken that away from him. And you deserve a big, fat mushroom print for pushing him so far down he has no want to climb back up and do what I know he can.

Is this some kind of trailer gypsy curse or hex she's trying to put on them? I've never heard this term before.

mushroom print

- when a dude slaps his penis against someone and it leaves a mark like a mushroom.

Other definitions include using a mushroom as a stamp, which wouldn't make sense in this context.

So this child is struggling academically? Can't imagine why, with such a insightful and eloquent parent.

you *did* check the URL, didn`t you?



from the FAQ on the URL:
It's simple, Printers: a mushroom print is a very crude term for smacking someone in the face, in our case deservedly, with a certain member of the human body, usually found on a male. In short, a Mushroom Print is a dick-slap.
 
2012-04-10 03:34:12 PM  

trappedspirit: they specifically have contact with other home schoolers and arrange things to get extra social engagement for their children.


groupthink of weird behavior?
 
2012-04-10 03:35:04 PM  

AliceInWonderland: TNel: cough...BS... cough. There may be 1 or 2 per district that will put in that kind of time, but majority are in for 8 hours or less then out. Workshops usually are for a few days during the summer that you are getting paid to have off, thankless parents.... I'll raise that to thankless teachers for all the work the support staff does for them and then the teachers have the audacity to complain to the custodians that worked all summer for $9 an hour that moved all of their desks into the hall, stripped the wax and put new wax down and moved all the stuff back in but didn't put the desks back exactly the way they like it.


This is satire, right?


I wish it was, but I see it all the time. There are some nice ones then there are others that feel that they are the only ones that matter and how dare you forget some little mundane thing amid the hundreds of other custom work that needs done.
 
2012-04-10 03:39:26 PM  

TNel: I wish it was, but I see it all the time. There are some nice ones then there are others that feel that they are the only ones that matter and how dare you forget some little mundane thing amid the hundreds of other custom work that needs done.


Interesting I work in a school where the majority of teachers puts in 50+ during the week, not counting the extra assignments, duty, work taken home, etc... I don't know a teacher who does just 8 hours a day or less. Or just does a couple day workshops in the summer. In order to keep our licenses we have to be going to school damn near constantly. Haven't seen any griping about the custodians either. But hey, if you think teaching is just what is in the classroom, then I suppose you would think teachers can get away with working less than 8 hours a day.
 
2012-04-10 03:46:57 PM  
why the f does this have a Spiffy tag?
 
2012-04-10 03:50:58 PM  

nohit: TravisBickle62: Some kids are just dumb

Well, the world needs ditch diggers, too.


The German ones are pretty awesome.
www.swapmeetdave.com
 
2012-04-10 04:00:31 PM  

TNel: Razzed:

Maybe some parents realise that social interaction is not mutually exclusive with school attendance. It's fairly easy to set up play time with other families, or enroll your kids in sports programs or art classes, and then send them to camp in the summer.

Do you really think that every important social interaction you ever had as a child happened at the school you attended?

Just wondering, since I don't even think that most of my important social interactions happened at school.

To your question: Yes if you are including the friends that I made whille being in said school that I probably wouldn't of had longer contact with than an hour or so here and there from "play dates". Play dates are like the military "mandatory fun" times that most people dread and have fun when you do it but afterward you are glad it is over.


I'm not including people you met in school. You can meet people anywhere. I'm talking social interaction such as, that person is crying, what should I do? Or, I really want to kiss this guy, how do I know if he wants me to kiss him? Or, that girl forgot her lunch today, should I offer to share some of my food? Or, my team just lost the game, is throwing a tantrum going to change that?

It's learning how to act or respond to others in social situations, whether it's with a friend, a coworker, or a complete stranger. I think it's quite ignorant to claim that this type of knowledge can only be learned in school. Social interaction happens everywhere, and we are generally quite capable of learning something from every one of those interactions.

/Also, sorry that your parents were play-date Nazis.
 
2012-04-10 04:06:14 PM  

Candawg: ph0rk: tentaculistic:

Too many acronyms. What are EDs?

That would be Erectile Dysfunctions according to late night TV commercials


Non- Snark Answer: emotional disabilities/disorders.
 
2012-04-10 04:20:12 PM  

ActionFigure: I know that it IS the job of teachers at the high school level.

It helps the kids.

It helps the parents know what the kid should be doing so they can do their part to get the kid on track.


I really hope that you mean the elementary school level. However, after third grade, the kids need to be taking care of that on their own.
 
2012-04-10 04:21:49 PM  

Persnickety: Yup, we just don't know enough to judge this one properly.


Really, "just don't know enough?" Are you trolling or what?

Here's what I know from reading this letter:

I know that the parent is barely literate. I know she doesn't believe in homework. I know she can't keep track of assignments any better than her 11 year old can. I know she expects teachers to somehow "make" a pre-teen "responsible". I know she has repeated violent ideations when interacting with her son's educators. I know she believes that even children who are failing subjects should be "laughing and having fun", and rather than being presented with the knowledge that he is failing.

I know that the parent thinks little enough of her own responsibility for the situation that s/he fails to mention a single specific positive action s/he has taken to address the difficulties her child is experiencing.

I know that there is nothing - not a single bad act or non-act - that she has laid at the feet of her own son.

I know from reading her other rants and followup posts that she is a single mother, probably has a very difficult life, and has few of the tools necessary to be successful in life, much less those tools needed to help a struggling child.

Regardless, she presents absolutely no evidence that the teacher or principal are acting inappropriately, and plenty of evidence that she simply doesn't understand when she's being played by her pre-teen son.

I also know the "you go girl!" affirmations in the comments are unlikely to help this woman or her boy.
 
2012-04-10 04:27:47 PM  
As an accredited teacher, allow me to weigh in on this.

Learning takes more than just the student and the teacher. This involves the parents as well. I can take a look at most kids and within about half an hour tell you who has parents who are doing okay, who has parents that are involved, and who has parents who are either incompetent/blind to the child or don't care. I've seen kids who have learning disabilities be successful because their parents care enough to put forth an effort. I've seen kids who are intelligent outright crash and burn because their parents just didn't believe that their precious snowflake was involved with drugs.

I'm not sure where the line is on this kid, but this parent's attitude leads me to believe it's a blind to the child situation. It's "everyone's fault but hers". No. It's not. She's part of the problem too. It could very well be that the school is complete garbage. The teacher could be as much as a harridan as she claims. The principal could very well be nothing more than a human-shaped lump of cheese sitting at a desk. That doesn't absolve her from her having to address the problems present. She should have options, unless that's a piss-poor excuse of a school board.

The point is, you've got to have everyone on board to the plan to make things work. I've had to step in and work a kid one on one because he just didn't work well with the teacher. In the span of 3 months, I basically tripled his mark. And all this happened because his parents cared enough to do something other than whine about it online. Yes, whining is free, but it doesn't get results. Work with your kid, or get someone else to.

/They can work on their own sometimes, but it doesn't always work
//Think I'm overpaid? Fark you. I work for free during school hours.
///Yes, it's a bloody madhouse in there sometimes.
 
2012-04-10 04:36:39 PM  
The parent is a dumbass. That said, our education system is a joke and teachers are not without blame.The Khan Academy,or something like it, is the future of education.

Link (new window)
 
2012-04-10 04:40:17 PM  

Headso: trappedspirit: they specifically have contact with other home schoolers and arrange things to get extra social engagement for their children.

groupthink of weird behavior?


Are we talking about fark or anime fans?
 
2012-04-10 04:53:06 PM  
I thought the letter was going to give the school the authority to punish the kid if he gets out of line. And praise the faculty for working insanely hard.

Times have changed.
 
2012-04-10 05:01:13 PM  
I am shocked - SHOCKED - to read about a parent who blames the school for her kid's difficulties in class.

That never happens.
 
2012-04-10 05:31:19 PM  

Famous Thamas: In this role as generic IT Guy, I was considered a "teacher's aide" and I was also in charge of the computer lab. Teachers had one or two slots per week where they would bring their class in for computer classes/fun time. On my first day, I was told it was up to me to ensure that the kids were behaving since the teachers would bring their kids in and leave for the entire period.

I tried to be fair in my role, and honestly, most of the kids were very good since they were in there to play Reader Rabbit or work on something they were interested in. The kid who picked up his chair and whacked the kid two seats over was not behaving. When I told him he'd be losing his computer privileges for a week, he took a swing at me, so I sat him in the corner of the room writing his alphabet in cursive until the teacher showed up again. I explained what happened to the teacher, who agreed with my punishment, and said she'd be contacting the parents about what happened. The next day there is a very angry mom waiting for me when I get to school in the principal's office. Apparently, I was racist because I'm white and the kid who liked hitting other kids with chairs is black.

I also had to maintain order at lunch/recess (bwahahahah!) and bus time. I got about the same amount of training that teachers out of college get in classroom discipline (that is to say... none).


Ah, then that makes sense. How is forcing a kid to write in cursive racist?
 
2012-04-10 05:36:45 PM  
Yawn.

Fake.
 
2012-04-10 05:50:30 PM  
Take an elementary class of kids. Have them run a 100 yard race.

See how some kids come out ahead, most finish together and some come in way behind?

Intelligence levels are skewed like that too lady. Deal with it.
 
2012-04-10 06:05:53 PM  
Anyone that relies on the school to teach anything is a failure as a parent. You don't learn things at school, you learn them at home and then prove you learned them at school.

Certainly you might luck out and also learn something at school, but relying on it is stupid.

You teach your kids to read at home, you teach them math at home, you teach them science at home, etc. I know some parents aren't that educated as well, but the majority of adults can teach enough to get through elementary school or if otherwise collect the materials (plenty of workbooks available that have the answers right in them) to help the kids.

I'm always surprised when someone complains about their kid falling behind as being a school's fault. I never learned anything at school, learned it at home, had skipped two grades by the time I reached 8th grade, entered university at 16 with full scholarship and advance placement (got to skip 1st year). And I can honestly say I didn't learn anything ever in the school environment. That is a really dumb way to approach school.
 
2012-04-10 06:10:37 PM  

Babwa Wawa: Persnickety: Yup, we just don't know enough to judge this one properly.

Really, "just don't know enough?" Are you trolling or what?

Here's what I know from reading this letter:

I know that the parent is barely literate. I know she doesn't believe in homework. I know she can't keep track of assignments any better than her 11 year old can. I know she expects teachers to somehow "make" a pre-teen "responsible". I know she has repeated violent ideations when interacting with her son's educators. I know she believes that even children who are failing subjects should be "laughing and having fun", and rather than being presented with the knowledge that he is failing.

I know that the parent thinks little enough of her own responsibility for the situation that s/he fails to mention a single specific positive action s/he has taken to address the difficulties her child is experiencing.

I know that there is nothing - not a single bad act or non-act - that she has laid at the feet of her own son.

I know from reading her other rants and followup posts that she is a single mother, probably has a very difficult life, and has few of the tools necessary to be successful in life, much less those tools needed to help a struggling child.

Regardless, she presents absolutely no evidence that the teacher or principal are acting inappropriately, and plenty of evidence that she simply doesn't understand when she's being played by her pre-teen son.

I also know the "you go girl!" affirmations in the comments are unlikely to help this woman or her boy.



You're right. The parent is 100% at fault. How can it be any other way?
 
2012-04-10 06:33:23 PM  

mojo moon: Third grade teachers have a power we never discuss. They have the potential to create lifelong learners or lifelong student failures. As an adult who finally clawed her way back to her own education, there have been many times when I've considered finding the grave of Mrs. Nash and "watering" it for the way she shamed, screamed, called students up to the front of the class to read cruel, pointed dictionary definitions


It's not just the elementary teachers who leave lasting scars. All it takes is one really bad, abusive teacher to do serious damage to a kid's future. Somewhere out there Mr. Reddington is still walking around breathing, much to my chagrin. Junior year of high school, he was my physics teacher. He read our grades aloud, in order from lowest to highest, with commentary, for the amusement and edification of the class. And for a full year, I had the dubious honor of being the first name called. I still remember the shame of hearing his deadpan, flat intonation: "Nmissi, sixteen percent. Up 3 pts from last week's record-setting thirteen percent. Good Job." I couldn't pass a single test in that course. If not for the homework, which gave partial credit for trying...I'd have flunked. As it was, I was pathetically grateful for my D.

I pulled A's in every class that didn't have numbers in it, but I've struggled with math my entire life. I had tutoring, after school sessions... nothing helped. (In college, I finally found out I have some sort of math learning disability.) However, the intense, embarrassing focus that teacher put me under, in front of my classmates, was largely responsible for me dropping out of high school my senior year. It likely held me back not only academically, but professionally as well. Before his class, I expected to go to college. I knew I had math issues, but I felt confident enough to achieve well in my stronger areas. After his class, I no longer felt secure in any of my abilities, even those areas in which I excelled. It took me ten years to work up the confidence to finish my hs diploma. After that, I enrolled in college and obtained degrees in anthropology and linguistics; I had great grades (again, except for the math requirement) and did extremely well there- but that period of faltering, of not trusting in my own brain, probably put me a decade behind in my career trajectory. And I hold Reddington responsible. Wherever he is, however he ends up, I really hope there's a hell, because he ought to burn in it.
 
2012-04-10 06:57:49 PM  
I can understand those who think the teacher is to blame, though I agree more with the parent being at fault here, not to mention the snowflake himself. You can say that its a lemon of a teacher, or say the curriculum is biased, or maybe the lead paint on the walls is at fault. It's fine to assign blame, even if you're blaming the wrong party.

Let's be reasonable here and talk for a second about expectations though. The teacher has been teaching for what sounds like a long time, usually an indication that she does good work. Maybe she's having a bad year, or maybe there are a lot of students who are behavior challenged. We don't have a lot of info either way. We can, however, state that the education system failed the parent. If their expectation of a public school is fun and excitement, and that they're teaching their child that school should be that way, then no public school in the world will be sufficient for the child. The parent raises wholly unachievable expectations and then slams the school for failing to achieve them. Perhaps the effort that the parent is putting into yelling at the educators could be better used helping the student overcome their disabilities.

Instead of assigning blame, fairly or not, how about taking all that energy and putting it towards your child's development? Would it be that bad for you, as a parent, to be even more involved in your child's education rather than waste time and energy in a fight like this?
 
2012-04-10 07:06:02 PM  
It must suck to be the parent of a stupid child.
 
2012-04-10 07:35:35 PM  

MR_DING: The parent is a dumbass. That said, our education system is a joke and teachers are not without blame.The Khan Academy,or something like it, is the future of education.

Link (new window)


The somewhat broken tutoring system was actually one of the issues I had with my daughter's school and I ended up recommending the Khan Academy to help them. They'd never heard of it and were thrilled to have the resource. It's an amazing project.
 
2012-04-10 07:43:15 PM  
I know, let's raise the teacher's pay, give them more time off and teach the kids about homosexuality. 'k?
 
2012-04-10 07:52:02 PM  

Mean Daddy: I know, let's raise the teacher's pay, give them more time off and teach the kids about homosexuality. 'k?


Children, Mean Daddy is what's known as a "bottom".
 
2012-04-10 08:02:58 PM  

OnlyM3: Frederick

That read like "my kid sucks at school -it's the teachers fault".
So it is you that's the teacher, your wife, or your mom.

We have an involved parent, asking the school for help and the school farking up. Of course you blame the parent. Fark you. Did the letter have some errors? Sure, for example " You are supposed to be a fun, happy environment for kids to go to." No, school is supposed to be a safe, educational environment. That said, the Parent is trying to ensure his/her child does well and the school's answer (as it always is) is to humiliate the child and ignore the problem.


First of all, I doubt you are really sincere with this response. Second, any kid that is struggling a lot in elementary school is an indication that there are issues at home -or perhaps a learning disability. There is no excuse for a fully functional parent to be unable to get an elementary student up to speed. The problem likely resides at home.

\the "fark you" was really over the top, troll.
 
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