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(Some Guy)   Open Letter To My Son's Teacher And Principal   (mushroomprinting.com) divider line 365
    More: Spiffy, DARE, Montessori school, teachers, elementary schools  
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34781 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Apr 2012 at 8:54 AM (3 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-04-10 10:40:03 AM  

megalynn44: Thanks fo the double team, but as I said, I find it a silly notion to say a 2nd grader should be weened off after school help from her parents with schoolwork.


The problem is that she wants handholding for every single problem. We literally (not an exaggeration) have to point to each problem on the paper and tell her to do it. Every single one. That's what we're trying to wean her off of. We're trying to get her to at least start on her own and come to us if she has problems.

Because if we don't start now, we'll be doing this for the rest of her school life.
 
2012-04-10 10:41:29 AM  
The elementary school teacher is most likely a downtrodden visionary. The sort of person who goes into the career for the love of the children. Any other kind of person is quickly weeded out by the absurd workload. Besides, nobody does this for the money. 18 hour days, thankless parents, and you spend all of your "time off" going to workshops to be a better teacher to worse children.

Most evenings are spent flagellating oneself, tirelessly hammering away at the ignorant scrawling produced by minds cultivated under the purview of the idle. Can I find a glimmer of understanding among this pile of rubble? Not today, but tomorrow is a new day.
 
2012-04-10 10:42:26 AM  

SBWorks: ph0rk: JeffreyScott: And, if true, there is NO excuse for a teacher to respond with to a struggling student with, "we already went over this." That might be a red flag that the teacher doesn't understand the subject matter.

I don't agree.

There are times when you've covered something so simple, so basic, that if you have to re-explain it either: (a) the kid is developmentally disabled. In the wrong class. or (b) the kid didn't pay attention the first time. Shouldn't be coddled.

And if you've explaining why 6 / 3 = 2 for the 4th or 5th time, that kid just used up their budget for one on one teacher time for the month. Time to cut losses and help the ones you can.

/Not a k-12 schoolteacher

Had to say this when traching cimmunity college level many, many times...

Can't imagine teaching at a "lower" level.


Was tutoring someone the other day on some basic linear algebra and I ran into this. The questions were stuff like find the intersection of 3y + 3x = 12 and 4y + 7x = 9, but when it came time for it I found that they were unable to do even basic arithmetic. You can only try to explain concepts like 3y/3 = y not 1 so many times before paroting sets in and they just start repeating everything you say without actually understanding a word of it.
 
2012-04-10 10:42:28 AM  

miss diminutive: He should be wanting to learn. I hate that you have taken that away from him. And you deserve a big, fat mushroom print for pushing him so far down he has no want to climb back up and do what I know he can.

Is this some kind of trailer gypsy curse or hex she's trying to put on them? I've never heard this term before.




26.media.tumblr.com
 
2012-04-10 10:46:25 AM  

ph0rk: megalynn44: Thanks fo the double team, but as I said, I find it a silly notion to say a 2nd grader should be weened off after school help from her parents with schoolwork.

There is a difference between "after school help" and "doing it for the kid".

All the help most 2nd graders need is discipline. Someone with more power than them to withhold TV or xbox until they do the damned work - they aren't going to have those time management skills at 7, 8 or 9.

/Don't post on Fark if you can't handle multiple people disagreeing with you at once.


Buddy, you're the one with the attitude. Chill out.
 
2012-04-10 10:46:33 AM  

chamblin: The elementary school teacher is most likely a downtrodden visionary. The sort of person who goes into the career for the love of the children. Any other kind of person is quickly weeded out by the absurd workload. Besides, nobody does this for the money. 18 hour days, thankless parents, and you spend all of your "time off" going to workshops to be a better teacher to worse children.

Most evenings are spent flagellating oneself, tirelessly hammering away at the ignorant scrawling produced by minds cultivated under the purview of the idle. Can I find a glimmer of understanding among this pile of rubble? Not today, but tomorrow is a new day.


cough...BS... cough. There may be 1 or 2 per district that will put in that kind of time, but majority are in for 8 hours or less then out. Workshops usually are for a few days during the summer that you are getting paid to have off, thankless parents.... I'll raise that to thankless teachers for all the work the support staff does for them and then the teachers have the audacity to complain to the custodians that worked all summer for $9 an hour that moved all of their desks into the hall, stripped the wax and put new wax down and moved all the stuff back in but didn't put the desks back exactly the way they like it.
 
2012-04-10 10:46:49 AM  

prickly pete v2: Someone else may have mentioned this, but it may be worth it to talk to the teacher and see if your daughter can type out her homework rather than writing it. My wife has had several students (a little older - 5th and 6th grade) who sound just like your daughter, and had great results with using a laptop for writing assignments, tests, etc.


This is actually on the table, but they want to see if they can get her handwriting up to par first.
 
2012-04-10 10:47:20 AM  
Meh, this sounds like a messed up situation, but I tend to side with the teacher. Unless the kid has a learning disability (and as such would have a plan of action agreed by principal and teacher), then he really should be responsible for making sure all assignments are recorded in his day planner without the teacher needing to check it. I mean if we were talking about a 6-year-old I could see where the mom was coming from, but by 11 (I am assuming 6th grade here) he needs to know how to be more responsible because junior high and high school teachers care even less about babysitting your kids homework assignments since they have hundreds of kids they teach, not just 25-30. If he is struggling with something that simple, he will fail even harder in junior high.

Oh and saying he has Bs and Cs with one F...is that F in something important like math? If so, then you seriously need to help your child or get them into tutoring (eat ramen for breakfast, lunch, and dinner if you have to). MIddle school teachers are going to expect the kid to have a basic understanding and if he doesn't, they are NOT going to spend time helping him out. Mom really needs to step up here because she is hurting her boy.

Now if he does have a learning disability and a plan of action the teacher and principal aren't following, then I feel her outrage is justified. Since she makes no mention of it though, I tend to think she just doesn't want to be responsible for her kid's bad grades.

Maybe the teacher is being a dick by not caring enough, but you know 6th grade is preparation for middle school. She shouldn't have to hand hold and coddle those kids.
 
2012-04-10 10:48:23 AM  

SuperChuck: Thunderpipes: Retire at 50 with a gigantic taxpayer funded pension, summers off, immunity to job loss, always get what you ask for or you strike, and get it anyway.....

Do you really think this? Towns all over the country are cutting back on educational spending and eliminating teaching positions. In the last couple years my town cut two entire schools.


In Burlington, VT, they raised the school budget 52% over the last 5 years.

In South Burlington, the average teacher salary is $68,000 a year. In Colchester, VT, the elementary school teachers are pulling down 60-80k a year. 25 sick days a year, they accumulate. Can have 80 sick days on standby maximum. These are paid days. Massive pensions, miniscule health care out of pocket, early retirement at $50-60k a year for life, fun!

Sign me up.
 
2012-04-10 10:49:22 AM  

Prof. Frink: greenboy:This morning we asked my 3 year old to put his socks on. As trivial as it is to us, to 3 year olds, it can be somewhat difficult. My child hangs his head and says: "I can't do it." our response was that it is okay if you can't do it, but you need to try first. Once you have put the effort into it and have failed, then we will help you.

All at once we are pushing these lessons:
1. Try to do something that you know is hard, even if you fail.
2. Try it first, then ask for help.
3. It is okay to ask for help, and we are happy to help, but only if you have tried.
4. It's okay to fail at something that you have put effort into.

Could you come give a seminar to my college students?


Nope. i'm only willing to extend the effort to my children. Their parents should have taught them that when they were toddlers.
Having said that, i goofed off in college and barely got through. My work ethic is much better (ignoring the fact that i am on fark at the moment).
 
2012-04-10 10:49:34 AM  

monkey_licker: Oh, and BTW, we live in a trailer park. If you would drop your ignorant prejudice for a moment, you might see that very normal, well adjusted people live in trailer parks because apartments suck and buying a home is not economically feasible.


When most people are talking about trailer parks, they mean low-rent slums. What vacation resort are you living in that is better than an apartment?
 
2012-04-10 10:49:48 AM  

BurnShrike: kisseswookies: Ha. This reminds me of my ex sister in law. Pissed that her toddler couldn't do preschool 8 hours a day, and when pressed as to why she would want to do that, her response was "well, I gave her 2 years of my life."

/note: having kids does not "fix" broken relationships.

Two years huh? What an amazing mother. It's a good thing they're ready to move out on their own by that age or it would be a lot more work to raise kids.


I know, collecting alimony and seeing your daughter once a month is a really tough job. It was silly of me to tell my brother he was an idiot for marrying a chick he knew for a month and met at a bar.
 
2012-04-10 10:49:48 AM  

i.r.id10t: I have a meeting with my oldest daughter's principal later this week, so I'm getting a kick out of these replies....

Apparently, the bible beating teacher thinks that covering history means telling the tale of jeebus and resurrection is historical fact...


I didn't read past this to see if it's already been asked, so I apologize if this is redundant, but do your children attend a public or private school?
 
2012-04-10 10:51:09 AM  

TNel: chamblin: The elementary school teacher is most likely a downtrodden visionary. The sort of person who goes into the career for the love of the children. Any other kind of person is quickly weeded out by the absurd workload. Besides, nobody does this for the money. 18 hour days, thankless parents, and you spend all of your "time off" going to workshops to be a better teacher to worse children.

Most evenings are spent flagellating oneself, tirelessly hammering away at the ignorant scrawling produced by minds cultivated under the purview of the idle. Can I find a glimmer of understanding among this pile of rubble? Not today, but tomorrow is a new day.

cough...BS... cough. There may be 1 or 2 per district that will put in that kind of time, but majority are in for 8 hours or less then out. Workshops usually are for a few days during the summer that you are getting paid to have off, thankless parents.... I'll raise that to thankless teachers for all the work the support staff does for them and then the teachers have the audacity to complain to the custodians that worked all summer for $9 an hour that moved all of their desks into the hall, stripped the wax and put new wax down and moved all the stuff back in but didn't put the desks back exactly the way they like it.


Actually, it's somewhere in the middle. Their workday is slightly more than 8 hours with lunch somewhere in there. My wife barely has time to eat her lunch in between preparing for the next class to come in. She is one of the hard workers though.
 
2012-04-10 10:51:45 AM  

Clemkadidlefark: This parent gets ten gold stars. Bravo!!

(bow get him the fark out of the pubic skrools and home school him so he stands a chance of developing a brain that isn't full of mush and Obama)


Wow, first and only mention of Obama in a 200+ post thread pretty much completely unrelated to anything overtly political. Truly, you are the DERPIEST!

Picture, you win it:
i1159.photobucket.com
 
2012-04-10 10:53:32 AM  

megalynn44: ph0rk: megalynn44: Thanks fo the double team, but as I said, I find it a silly notion to say a 2nd grader should be weened off after school help from her parents with schoolwork.

There is a difference between "after school help" and "doing it for the kid".

All the help most 2nd graders need is discipline. Someone with more power than them to withhold TV or xbox until they do the damned work - they aren't going to have those time management skills at 7, 8 or 9.

/Don't post on Fark if you can't handle multiple people disagreeing with you at once.

Buddy, you're the one with the attitude. Chill out.


Oh no you're getting triple teamed!!11


pasketti: This is actually on the table, but they want to see if they can get her handwriting up to par first.


If you can afford it, get her looked at by a specialist. A teacher is not qualified to diagnose dysgraphia.

/Lugged a fugging typewriter through middle and high school.
//Laptops would be far lower-stigma today.
 
2012-04-10 10:53:58 AM  

TNel: monkey_licker: On day three I heard the teacher say to my son as he struggled to remember exactly what he needed to do as part of the morning routine "Well you should remember this by now." That was his last day in public school, and he has been home schooled successfully ever since.

Oh, and BTW, we live in a trailer park. If you would drop your ignorant prejudice for a moment, you might see that very normal, well adjusted people live in trailer parks because apartments suck and buying a home is not economically feasible.

Wow over react much. Most likely they were saying that trying to build your child up by saying "Hey your remember how this is done don't you". I say that to my kids all the time because they know the answer but are unsure of themselves, so you try to make it sound like they figured it out on their own and not you doing everything for them.


It is all in the tone and presentation. In my estimation the teacher was not encouraging, but exasperated and most likely overworked. She had 30 students in her class and probably wasn't able to realistically provide the extra assistance he needed. Notice I didn't attack the teacher. I think it is systemic. In most school systems teachers are handling larger and larger classes and this will inevitably lead to fewer resources available to help special needs students.
 
2012-04-10 10:55:45 AM  
So the parent wants the teacher to stop what he/she is doing helping the other 25-30 kids in class to devote more time to this one kid. Get the kid a tutor if you want that. And if you want your kids one F to go up you should probably help more out at home.
 
2012-04-10 10:55:49 AM  

JWideman: When most people are talking about trailer parks, they mean low-rent slums. What vacation resort are you living in that is better than an apartment?


The low-rent shiatholes they could afford for the same monthly they pay for the trailer, I'd guess. There are some real horrid places out there, and at least for the first two years a new trailer is acceptably nice inside. Or so they seemed to visit, anyway - never lived in one.


/I like walking to bars.
 
2012-04-10 10:56:49 AM  

Earguy: EatHam: melopene: From what I hear, this sort of BS whining from parents has filtered into the first few years of undergrad.

I have had a parent call me after I did not bring their kid back for a second interview.

The worst I've seen is getting a résumé submission with the cover letter from his mother. It was just ridiculous.


I was on a sales call at a client's (large healthcare company) and a twenty-ish kid walked in with his mother. Kid sat down in the lobby near me, holding his resume & what looked like school transcripts as his mother went to the reception desk. I overheard her asking what jobs were open and if a hiring manager were available to interview her son. I got called into my meeting before I could get more info.
 
2012-04-10 10:57:05 AM  

mrswest: This quote is bullshiat. There are some students you simply can't reach. I had a kid fail because he never showed up. Never. Not once. Then he showed up after school one day and wanted his make-up work. How in the hell am I supposed to reach that kid? There are kids that, no matter what you do, have a shiatty attitude about school because society tells them that 1) they don't really need an education, 2) high school diplomas are worthless, 3) it's not their fault that they suck, even though it is or 4) any and all authority figures are out to get them and shouldn't be trusted. You can't combat the training they get at home if their parents are teaching them that the teacher is the enemy, as this mother clearly believes.

You get to a point where you realize you can't care more than the kid cares, because you're simply going to lose your mind if you do. There are kids that want to be there and are ready and willing to learn. Their education should not be short-changed because the teacher is spending all of their time trying to reach out to the assholes.

/Yes, the American education system is COMPLETELY broken. That's why the parents have to step up.
//Any school district is just fine if the parents do their job and actually raise their kids.


Did you find out where this kid was? Did you talk to the rest of your team? Principal? Find out what was going on at home?

Kids will fail classes, but you have to do your part. And if you accept that you can't reach this kid, then maybe you and your team need to see about who can.

When I was teaching, I worked in a alternative education program. We taught the kids that the schools gave up on. We had the kids with broken and screwed up homes. We had the kids with severe behavioral problems. We had the kids with behavioral problems coupled with learning disabilities AND screwed up lives. It's hard to convince a kid who has no idea where they'll be sleeping or if they'll eat that day that homework is important.

Our approach was to work with these kids. See that they got the help they needed. I was proud as Hells when one of my students confided that her biggest worry wasn't about school, but that if she didn't let her stepdad come into her room at night, that he'd go after her sister. We got that to stop, and we got her and her Mom to press charges and testify. Oddly enough, her grades improved when he got arrested.

It means that as teachers, you have to get involved. Not in the creepy, "meet me behind the bleachers if you want an A" sense, but making a difference in your kids' lives.

You work with your team, and you dig. You find out what's wrong, and you do your part. Will you fail in some cases? Probably. Does it suck? Certainly. But you do your part, and pass on what you can't to those who can. Giving up on kids is the greatest sin a teacher can do. Giving up without trying that is.

You do what you can, and learn from your mistakes. Learn from those failures. Just throwing your hands up in the air? That is as much a part of the problem as administrators who siphon off cash to the football program, or game tests so that their favorite programs can stay funded...
 
2012-04-10 10:59:44 AM  

brigid_fitch: I was on a sales call at a client's (large healthcare company) and a twenty-ish kid walked in with his mother. Kid sat down in the lobby near me, holding his resume & what looked like school transcripts as his mother went to the reception desk. I overheard her asking what jobs were open and if a hiring manager were available to interview her son. I got called into my meeting before I could get more info.


My mother went to my first job "interview" too, but I was 14 and a half (the absolute earliest you could work in NC with parental permission way back when), and IIRC she had to sign some forms, too. I was so glad when I turned 15 and I could quit a franchise McDonald's run by incompetent scumbags and upgrade to bagger at Food Lion.
 
2012-04-10 11:01:24 AM  

ph0rk: If you can afford it, get her looked at by a specialist. A teacher is not qualified to diagnose dysgraphia.


We did. Mild ADD with mild dysgraphia. It wasn't until we had that in writing that we were able to get them to start listening to us. One issue is that dysgraphia is not a recognized disability in our school district, but we're working around that.

The doctor recommended nutritional supplements for six months (lecithin, omega 3, magnesium, zinc) and if that didn't help, then he'd try some sort of drug. I wasn't expecting much from them, but to my amazement the supplements are making a difference. She's able to focus more on the task at hand.
 
2012-04-10 11:01:35 AM  

someonelse: I love how she gives HERSELF a ton of slack - "I'm trying but it's really hard," etc., but with the teacher she's all I DON'T CARE FIX IT FIX IT FIX IT! Her whole letter smacks of self-absorbed entitlement.


And I love that one of her complaints is the teacher insisting the student stay after school. For what? Most likely tutoring so her ass doesn't get reamed when test scores come back.
 
2012-04-10 11:01:41 AM  
The letter writer obviously isn't aware that prepositions are not the kind of words to end a sentence with.
 
2012-04-10 11:01:55 AM  
I was a substitute teacher for over 3 years. I just quit (they don't know it yet, but I have.) Halle---farking--lajuh!!

The last thing I did wrong was tell a girl that she needed more education--not in a mean way, but just in a conversation about the role of schools and her role in trying to learn things. (She was a special ed kid. What was wrong with her? I don't know--they don't tell subs stuff like that. But we're supposed to deal with a classroom full of them anyway.)

You're not supposed to tell kids that they need more education, it hurts their feelings. She was in 7th grade, and apparently thought that she was educated enough, even though she could barely read. Even though you're not supposed to "label" the special ed kids, if you tell them that they have to behave, they'll immediately tell you how they have ADHD or bi-polar or seizures or something, so they don't have to sit down in the classroom or do the work or treat the teacher with respect.

I will never work in a school again. Every teacher I met was disillusioned, burnt out, overwhelmed by paperwork, and tired tired tired of the parents who were never satisfied, and never thought that their kid needed to just sit down, shut up, and pay attention.
 
2012-04-10 11:02:52 AM  

greenboy: greenlady1: I have ADHD that was diagnosed the summer before 9th grade. All throughout elementary and middle school, my parents would help me with my homework on a daily basis. They would talk to the teachers about my performance in school, which was mostly pretty good, but I had this lovely habit of reading a book during class and not paying attention. They didn't talk down to the teachers; instead, they started a dialogue that was beneficial to everyone. It helped when my parents had to have some teachers fill out surveys to give to the doctor to diagnose my ADHD.

If this woman's son is struggling in school, *she* needs to check his planner. *She* needs to start a civil dialogue with the teacher/s about what *she* can do with him at home to help him learn the subject material better.

To be fair, I'm sure there are teachers who simply don't care. There are probably teachers who are just plain mean. But the author of this "blog" isn't doing herself any favors by acting like a spoiled brat.

Do i know you?


Depends on why you're green!
 
2012-04-10 11:04:47 AM  
Don't get mad at the teacher. If the teacher isn't a good fit for your kid (not necessarily a bad teacher, but a poor match for whatever reason) then just switch classes. It's not that big of a deal.
 
2012-04-10 11:06:37 AM  

greenboy:

Actually, it's somewhere in the middle. Their workday is slightly more than 8 hours with lunch somewhere in there. My wife barely has time to eat her lunch in between preparing for the next class to come in. She is one of the hard workers though.


I see them get to work and leave vast majority get there at 7am and are out the door by 3:30 with 30 min lunch. I know of a few that always get there at 7:30 and leave at 3:00. School starts at 7:35 and done at 2:35. Now there are always exceptions and there are some that get there at 6:30 and leave at 4 but those are very few.

Everyone gets a free period off so that gets you atleast 45min (primary), 1 hr 30 min (HS) free time to grade papers and setup.
 
2012-04-10 11:06:44 AM  

Darkwing: The letter writer obviously isn't aware that prepositions are not the kind of words to end a sentence with.


That the sort of thing up with which I will not put.
 
2012-04-10 11:07:56 AM  
this would only bbe better if the snowfalke in question was homeschooled.
 
2012-04-10 11:08:30 AM  
thesignalinthenoise.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-04-10 11:08:46 AM  
FTA: You are older than dirt and a biatch.

Excellent way to set the tone when trying to take the high ground and change people's stereotypes about trailer trash.
 
2012-04-10 11:09:17 AM  
Blarg. That's the thing up with which I will not put.
 
2012-04-10 11:09:21 AM  

pasketti: ph0rk: If you can afford it, get her looked at by a specialist. A teacher is not qualified to diagnose dysgraphia.

We did. Mild ADD with mild dysgraphia. It wasn't until we had that in writing that we were able to get them to start listening to us. One issue is that dysgraphia is not a recognized disability in our school district, but we're working around that.

The doctor recommended nutritional supplements for six months (lecithin, omega 3, magnesium, zinc) and if that didn't help, then he'd try some sort of drug. I wasn't expecting much from them, but to my amazement the supplements are making a difference. She's able to focus more on the task at hand.


Depends on the type of dysgraphia, of course, when I went through it it was basically "tough luck, kid".

There were a number of teachers that refused to play ball, but as I was also in the top track and tended to be in the top percentile on our state tests (NC loves state tests), they were limited in how dickish they could really be. Sort of a rare case where the bureaucracy actually worked in my favor while also completely ignoring my needs. My parents put an inordinate amount of time into trying to move the bureaucratic behemoth with what I can assume were nil results. Eventually I just started toting the typewriter and using it.

Public universities here, OTOH, were very accommodating and on top of things. I had priority registration, tutors if I wanted them (which didn't make sense but I guess they have a total LD "package"), note takers, extra test time, etc. They still nearly lost me anyway, but it is pretty hard to combat the male "WTF is school for?" effect at 17-20.

In grad school(s), I've only had to caution people once or twice that my handwriting is atrocious and they'd be better off if I can type out an exam essay, and they have always accommodated. Of course, I don't wait until exam day to do this.

So, enough CSB. Good luck with it.
 
2012-04-10 11:10:48 AM  

greenboy: Prof. Frink: greenboy:This morning we asked my 3 year old to put his socks on. As trivial as it is to us, to 3 year olds, it can be somewhat difficult. My child hangs his head and says: "I can't do it." our response was that it is okay if you can't do it, but you need to try first. Once you have put the effort into it and have failed, then we will help you.

All at once we are pushing these lessons:
1. Try to do something that you know is hard, even if you fail.
2. Try it first, then ask for help.
3. It is okay to ask for help, and we are happy to help, but only if you have tried.
4. It's okay to fail at something that you have put effort into.

Could you come give a seminar to my college students?

Nope. i'm only willing to extend the effort to my children. Their parents should have taught them that when they were toddlers.
Having said that, i goofed off in college and barely got through. My work ethic is much better (ignoring the fact that i am on fark at the moment).


This cannot be stressed enough. Fail gloriously, fail often, fail so tremendously that when someone else sees it they think "hell even if I was trying, I couldn't mess up that bad". Fail over and over again and be good with yourself afterwards. Big successes take big failures. Nothing comes easy.

But for god's sake, fail quickly!

Failure management is the cornerstone of learning. Neither this woman nor her snowflake have a clue about it.
 
2012-04-10 11:11:51 AM  

greenlady1: If this woman's son is struggling in school, *she* needs to check his planner. *She* needs to start a civil dialogue with the teacher/s about what *she* can do with him at home to help him learn the subject material better.


Did you not read the part where *She* lives in a trailer? *She* probably needs some remedial classes herself.
 
2012-04-10 11:12:21 AM  
"You are supposed to be a fun, happy environment for kids to go to"

Pussy libs.
 
2012-04-10 11:12:43 AM  

rohar: Failure management is the cornerstone of learning. Neither this woman nor her snowflake have a clue about it.


I generally agree, but I don't think that principle should extend to failing an entire year of elementary school.

Or, rather, correctly applying it should result in success.
 
2012-04-10 11:13:29 AM  

Dubya's_Coke_Dealer: "You are supposed to be a fun, happy environment for kids to go to"

Pussy libs.


Too late in the thread. Not strong troll-fu.
 
2012-04-10 11:13:41 AM  

rohar: This cannot be stressed enough. Fail gloriously, fail often, fail so tremendously that when someone else sees it they think "hell even if I was trying, I couldn't mess up that bad". Fail over and over again and be good with yourself afterwards. Big successes take big failures. Nothing comes easy.

But for god's sake, fail quickly!

Failure management is the cornerstone of learning. Neither this woman nor her snowflake have a clue about it.


One of my favorite sayings: Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement.
 
2012-04-10 11:13:51 AM  

greenlady1: greenboy: greenlady1: I have ADHD that was diagnosed the summer before 9th grade. All throughout elementary and middle school, my parents would help me with my homework on a daily basis. They would talk to the teachers about my performance in school, which was mostly pretty good, but I had this lovely habit of reading a book during class and not paying attention. They didn't talk down to the teachers; instead, they started a dialogue that was beneficial to everyone. It helped when my parents had to have some teachers fill out surveys to give to the doctor to diagnose my ADHD.

If this woman's son is struggling in school, *she* needs to check his planner. *She* needs to start a civil dialogue with the teacher/s about what *she* can do with him at home to help him learn the subject material better.

To be fair, I'm sure there are teachers who simply don't care. There are probably teachers who are just plain mean. But the author of this "blog" isn't doing herself any favors by acting like a spoiled brat.

Do i know you?

Depends on why you're green!


last name. Not b/c i'm a hippie.
 
2012-04-10 11:14:16 AM  

Javacrucian: I know you may have stereotyped us because we live in a trailer park and are on the free lunch program, but you don't know much of anything at all.

I know that the rest of your letter sounds like something you would be shouting into a cell phone while pushing your three kids in a stroller in front of the Dollar Store and trying to light a cigarette all at the same time.


Only pregnant women do that.
 
2012-04-10 11:15:47 AM  

ph0rk: rohar: Failure management is the cornerstone of learning. Neither this woman nor her snowflake have a clue about it.

I generally agree, but I don't think that principle should extend to failing an entire year of elementary school.

Or, rather, correctly applying it should result in success.


You see, that's the fail quickly part. If you fail slowly, the failure is generally HUGE!
 
2012-04-10 11:18:05 AM  
I got in trouble in 3rd grade because I knew how to do long division and the teacher, well, didn't. I corrected her and cause a farkstorm. It is in my personality. I just can't help it.
 
2012-04-10 11:18:37 AM  

CujoQuarrel: Why don't we all go over there and leave a few 'choice' comments :-)


Just left one and it was "moderated out" - so apparently they don't want to read any dissenting opinions. Fark them then.
 
2012-04-10 11:22:16 AM  

hitlersbrain: RussianPooper: This can't be real. Blame the teachers for everything and then openly oppose anything they need to do to help your child get educated. It reads like satire.
Those can't be real people agreeing with this transparent nonsense, can it?

Yes, endless studies have shown that belittling children and telling them they are failures is the best way to help them succeed.

I guess what irks me the most is that our methods of teaching (or NOT teaching) probably pre-dates cavemen. It is, hands down, the... worst.. possible... way... to do it.

Even when I was a kid, before interactive computers with internet access, I heard people biatching about how kids could not stop watching television and would rather watch television that a teacher rambling on. The first thought in my head was... use television then, idiot.

Teaching needs to evolve and teachers need to be replaced with individual, interactive learning via something with the patience and ability to do the job, aka a computer.


So you want to rely on the individual motivation of the students? That's sharp! The Socratic method is the only way to truly teach. When artificial intelligence gets to the point where all questions can be answered by computers let me know. Until then, the glorified electronic textbooks should remain a tool in a larger overall scheme.
 
2012-04-10 11:22:44 AM  

Trance354: greenlady1: I have ADHD that was diagnosed the summer before 9th grade. All throughout elementary and middle school, my parents would help me with my homework on a daily basis. They would talk to the teachers about my performance in school, which was mostly pretty good, but I had this lovely habit of reading a book during class and not paying attention. They didn't talk down to the teachers; instead, they started a dialogue that was beneficial to everyone. It helped when my parents had to have some teachers fill out surveys to give to the doctor to diagnose my ADHD.



Hmm, sounds like when I was in school. Not ADHD, Asperger's Syndrome. Sit in class all day and read. When the teacher asked if I was paying attention, I'd repeat back to her what she was just talking about. Not so much on the interpersonal skills. Teachers didn't know what to do with me.

/also not diagnosed until after college


Yea I didn't have that skill lol! Sometimes though I would completely space out and have teachers call on me and I literally would be so far "gone" that I wouldn't hear them for a few minutes. Freaked them out massively. Thankfully, had some tests done to show that I was not having petit mal seizures.

Although, since my ADHD is just inattentive and not hyperactive, I wonder if my upcoming nasal surgery to fix my deviated septum so I can finally farking breathe through my nose and sleep well at night will help wake my brain up a bit.

Again, my saving grace for many years was my parents absolutely making sure I got my homework done. It was definitely a struggle. It would take me 3 hours to do something that should've taken 30 minutes. But once I was finished, they would check it and help me out with it if I didn't understand. Or at least made sure I would ask my teacher about what I didn't understand if they couldn't explain it. And they knew something was a bit off, but I think they wanted to see if I would outgrow it.
 
2012-04-10 11:25:26 AM  

trappedspirit: greenlady1: If this woman's son is struggling in school, *she* needs to check his planner. *She* needs to start a civil dialogue with the teacher/s about what *she* can do with him at home to help him learn the subject material better.

Did you not read the part where *She* lives in a trailer? *She* probably needs some remedial classes herself.


I didn't realize living in a McMansion was a requirement for being civil to a teacher.
 
2012-04-10 11:29:04 AM  
This reads like my boss wrote it. She treats her loud, inconsiderate rugrats like inconveniences, then biatches to me about their teachers and having to go to truancy court. Some kids you can tell are just screwed from day one.

/I know how she treats her kids because that's how she treats her employees.
 
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