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(Yahoo)   Ass = Donkey. And other essential translations for US visitors to the Olympics this year   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 178
    More: Amusing, American English, British English, United States, London Bridge, football pitch, Half Moon Bay, Lake District, entrees  
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11056 clicks; posted to Main » on 08 Apr 2012 at 9:47 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-04-08 08:47:29 AM  
Crumpet and strumpet are two entirely different things.
 
2012-04-08 09:07:08 AM  
images3.wikia.nocookie.net

//I really should have had safe search on.....
 
2012-04-08 09:39:07 AM  
I think the author is attempting to cause mischief, there's a lot of crap in there.
 
2012-04-08 09:49:11 AM  

cretinbob: [images3.wikia.nocookie.net image 379x266]

//I really should have had safe search on.....


Were they able to get the poor dear out? (I hate seeing pictures like that. There's one with a baby elephant that's heartbreaking.)
 
2012-04-08 09:50:53 AM  
Cor blimey!
 
2012-04-08 09:51:20 AM  
"Torrid" has the opposite meaning for sports in England. In the U.S., if a sprinter runs a "torrid race," it means they captured gold. In Britain, it means they made it to the finish line during the medal ceremony.

Huh? I thought it meant it was really hot and they perspired a lot
 
2012-04-08 09:51:48 AM  
Fanny:

In US - bum/butt/ass
In UK - vagina
 
2012-04-08 09:52:45 AM  

ExperianScaresCthulhu: cretinbob: [images3.wikia.nocookie.net image 379x266]

//I really should have had safe search on.....

Were they able to get the poor dear out? (I hate seeing pictures like that. There's one with a baby elephant that's heartbreaking.)


No, they poured acid down there, and well, that just took care of everything.
 
2012-04-08 09:53:19 AM  

Slaxl: I think the author is attempting to cause mischief, there's a lot of crap in there.


This. I'm pretty sure half of those are either made up or only for the pedants.

/but this one is true. Try it yourself:
// US - "to go" = UK - "take away"
 
2012-04-08 09:55:34 AM  
That person must have forgotten about Canada when she decided to talk shiat about football.
 
2012-04-08 09:56:23 AM  
Whoever wrote this is an idiot. An anorak is a specific type of down jacket usually worn by geeks, always hooded and usually fur-lined at the hood. The jacket Kenny wears in South Park is an anorak. The geek connection came from short-wave enthusiasts gathering along the coasts of Britian on cold nights trying to communicate across the waters as far as possible to land and ships at sea.

A biscuit IS a cookie. A scone is a scone. Hell, they even have arguments over whether a Kit-Kat chocolate bar is a biscuit (technically, it is).

A bitter is not a beer. Budweiser is a beer (quite popular in Britain for some strange reason). A bitter is a pale ale, like Old Speckled Hen (highly recommended, BTW).

As for Brits using military time, what? That's just bullshiat. They tell time the same way we do, which is both ways, but mostly on a 12-hour cycle -- see http://www.tvguide.co.uk, for example (new window). It is dates that they do differently -- DD-MM-YY instead of our form of MM--DD--YY.

Again -- retarded writer is retarded.
 
2012-04-08 09:57:46 AM  

hillary: Whoever wrote this is an idiot. An anorak is a specific type of down jacket usually worn by geeks, always hooded and usually fur-lined at the hood. The jacket Kenny wears in South Park is an anorak. The geek connection came from short-wave enthusiasts gathering along the coasts of Britian on cold nights trying to communicate across the waters as far as possible to land and ships at sea.

A biscuit IS a cookie. A scone is a scone. Hell, they even have arguments over whether a Kit-Kat chocolate bar is a biscuit (technically, it is).

A bitter is not a beer. Budweiser is a beer (quite popular in Britain for some strange reason). A bitter is a pale ale, like Old Speckled Hen (highly recommended, BTW).

As for Brits using military time, what? That's just bullshiat. They tell time the same way we do, which is both ways, but mostly on a 12-hour cycle -- see http://www.tvguide.co.uk, for example (new window). It is dates that they do differently -- DD-MM-YY instead of our form of MM--DD--YY.

Again -- retarded writer is retarded.


You sound agitated. Let me make you cup of tea to relax.
 
2012-04-08 09:57:47 AM  

SwiftFox: "Torrid" has the opposite meaning for sports in England. In the U.S., if a sprinter runs a "torrid race," it means they captured gold. In Britain, it means they made it to the finish line during the medal ceremony.

Huh? I thought it meant it was really hot and they perspired a lot


Any affair, extra-marital or not, by a Member of Parliament is by necessity "torrid."
 
2012-04-08 09:58:08 AM  
fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net
 
2012-04-08 09:59:08 AM  
If someone excuses themselves to go to the bathroom, they mean that literally - they are going to take a bath. To use a restroom, ask for the "loo."

Bullshiat - going to the bathroom & going to the loo are the same thing.

"Torrid" has the opposite meaning for sports in England. In the U.S., if a sprinter runs a "torrid race," it means they captured gold. In Britain, it means they made it to the finish line during the medal ceremony.

On either side of the Atlantic, "torrid" means passionate or hot. Not much to do with running.

If you are served a biscuit, it will be a scone, not a cookie.

Bollocks. Biscuits are cookies. Scones are scones. No-one in Britain would ever refer to a scone as a biscuit.
 
2012-04-08 09:59:57 AM  

rbaron71: Fanny:

In US - bum/butt/ass
In UK - vagina


This. I'm an American and I still wince every time someone refers to a waist/belt pack as a "fanny pack."
/sounds kinda dirty, too.
 
2012-04-08 10:00:51 AM  
Also, the existence of computer networks has greatly diminished the need for this sort of Brit/US "translation" article. To take just one example, any American who doesn't by now know what a "wanker" is is, well, a wanker.
 
2012-04-08 10:03:14 AM  
One on't cross beams gone owt askew on treddle.
 
2012-04-08 10:03:34 AM  
"I'm going for an Indian" = "I'm going for Indian food".

Yeah, really. I didn't believe this at first, but several British friends have confirmed it.
 
2012-04-08 10:03:36 AM  

DuncanMhor: If you are served a biscuit, it will be a scone, not a cookie.

Bollocks. Biscuits are cookies. Scones are scones. No-one in Britain would ever refer to a scone as a biscuit.


But, in turn, Jammy Dodger biscuits are the dog's bollocks.

(let Farkers try to figure that one out)

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-04-08 10:04:57 AM  

rbaron71: Fanny:

In US - bum/butt/ass
In UK - vagina


Your US translation is lacking. Grandmothers say "fanny" because "butt" is crass. It's the most innocent way to refer to rear ends, even more than "rear end." That's why the dichotomy's so awesome, because old ladies say "get your fanny back in here" and "I'll just run down to Fanny Farmer for some chocolate."
 
2012-04-08 10:05:09 AM  
And don't be takin' the piss with the old Bill.
 
2012-04-08 10:06:02 AM  
What planet was the writer on...

Biscuit in the US is what we call a scone. If you ask for a biscuit, you'll be offered a selection of cookie-like food types... digestives, chocolate bourbons, rich tea, custard creams...

beer mat... nope, we call them coasters too.

you can ask for the check in the restaurant, they'll know you meant to say bill... and 'cheque' is a payment method slowly being phased out over here, the banking equivalent of the US check. said the same, spelt different .

loo/toilet/restroom - its all the same...

24 hour clock my arse... we use am/pm the same as everyone else... occasionally on a train or bus timetable you'll see 24 hour clock, but that's about it.

pip pip, and all that!

/should have been written by an englishperson.
 
2012-04-08 10:07:53 AM  

bazzanoid: What planet was the writer on...

Biscuit in the US is what we call a scone. If you ask for a biscuit, you'll be offered a selection of cookie-like food types... digestives, chocolate bourbons, rich tea, custard creams...

beer mat... nope, we call them coasters too.

you can ask for the check in the restaurant, they'll know you meant to say bill... and 'cheque' is a payment method slowly being phased out over here, the banking equivalent of the US check. said the same, spelt different .

loo/toilet/restroom - its all the same...

24 hour clock my arse... we use am/pm the same as everyone else... occasionally on a train or bus timetable you'll see 24 hour clock, but that's about it.

pip pip, and all that!

/should have been written by an englishperson.


Are you telling porkies?
 
2012-04-08 10:08:15 AM  
I wonder how many foreigners will look the wrong way before stepping of the kerb and getting flattened by a motorist's tyre.
 
2012-04-08 10:09:08 AM  

BurnShrike: I wonder how many foreigners will look the wrong way before stepping off the kerb and getting flattened by a motorist's tyre.


Need more coffee tea.
 
2012-04-08 10:09:41 AM  

BurnShrike: I wonder how many foreigners will look the wrong way before stepping of the kerb and getting flattened by a motorist's tyre.


I almost got killed a few times doing that. It takes a bit of getting used to, and then you come back to the states and have to unlearn it for the same reason.
 
2012-04-08 10:09:52 AM  
Some of the important ones they'll actually need to know:

Way out = Exit
Alight = Disembark
"alright?" = "Hello. How's it going?"
Tosser = Cool guy
Bell end... Well, you're going to have to figure that out on your own.
 
2012-04-08 10:10:33 AM  
Nigel: All right, my son. I could've had it away with this crackin' judy, my old chine.

Austin: Are you telling pork pies and a bag of tripe, because if you are feeling quiggly, why not just have a J. Arthur?

Nigel: What, billy no-mates?

Austin: Too right, youth.

Nigel: Don't you remember the crimbo din-din we had with the grotty scots bint?

Austin: Oh, the one that was all sixes and sevens.

Nigel: Yes, yes, yes. She was the trouble and strife of the morris dancer that lived up the apples and pears!

Austin: Yes, she was the barrister that became a bobby in a lorry.

Both: She shat on a turtle! Ha ha ha!
 
2012-04-08 10:11:42 AM  
The worst gaffe I made, for some bizarre reason, was ask for an iced tea. You'd have thought I had suggested gang-raping the Queen. It was a mistake I only made once.
 
2012-04-08 10:13:19 AM  
This whole thing seems nothing more than a load of codswallop.
 
2012-04-08 10:13:23 AM  

hillary: BurnShrike: I wonder how many foreigners will look the wrong way before stepping of the kerb and getting flattened by a motorist's tyre.

I almost got killed a few times doing that. It takes a bit of getting used to, and then you come back to the states and have to unlearn it for the same reason.


Eh, I've never had that problem. I always look both ways before crossing any street. I think the hardest part would be actually driving over there.
 
2012-04-08 10:14:00 AM  

hillary: The worst gaffe I made, for some bizarre reason, was ask for an iced tea. You'd have thought I had suggested gang-raping the Queen. It was a mistake I only made once.


Haha yes. That's blasphemy.
 
2012-04-08 10:15:45 AM  
I rented a scooter (I ride a Vespa here), took it back within an hour as I almost got killed three times due to my dumbassity. The tube, busses, and taxis suddenly were very appealing.
 
2012-04-08 10:18:24 AM  
I've never heard of someone running a race that was described as "torrid", either good or bad. Is that perhaps a regional or just made up thing?
 
2012-04-08 10:18:35 AM  
FTA: If the subject of your weight comes up, tread carefully. The British use the word "stone" for their weight. A stone is 14 pounds.

This is the stupidest unit of measure ever. I've never met anyone (British or otherwise) who use this term. Is it really common or is it one of those things a few die-hards who have outlived their usefulness still insist on doing?
 
2012-04-08 10:19:31 AM  

hillary: I rented a scooter (I ride a Vespa here), took it back within an hour as I almost got killed three times due to my dumbassity. The tube, busses, and taxis suddenly were very appealing.


Brave man. I probably wouldn't try it. I'd just rely on my relatives to drive me around and using train to get from relative to relative.
 
2012-04-08 10:20:31 AM  

Tyrosine: FTA: If the subject of your weight comes up, tread carefully. The British use the word "stone" for their weight. A stone is 14 pounds.

This is the stupidest unit of measure ever. I've never met anyone (British or otherwise) who use this term. Is it really common or is it one of those things a few die-hards who have outlived their usefulness still insist on doing?


It's pretty common when talking about body weight. Using stone as a measure is almost as silly as using pounds and ounces.
 
2012-04-08 10:20:32 AM  

BurnShrike: hillary: BurnShrike: I wonder how many foreigners will look the wrong way before stepping of the kerb and getting flattened by a motorist's tyre.

I almost got killed a few times doing that. It takes a bit of getting used to, and then you come back to the states and have to unlearn it for the same reason.

Eh, I've never had that problem. I always look both ways before crossing any street. I think the hardest part would be actually driving over there.


In the tourist areas, they actually write on the the road which direction you should look.

cache.virtualtourist.com
 
2012-04-08 10:20:32 AM  

Tyrosine: FTA: If the subject of your weight comes up, tread carefully. The British use the word "stone" for their weight. A stone is 14 pounds.

This is the stupidest unit of measure ever. I've never met anyone (British or otherwise) who use this term. Is it really common or is it one of those things a few die-hards who have outlived their usefulness still insist on doing?


I hear it all the time, though only for weights of humans
 
2012-04-08 10:21:30 AM  
If a beady-eyed, pointy-nosed hedgehog of a man comes up to you and asks "Are you a sponge or a stone?", tell him you voted Conservative.
 
2012-04-08 10:24:39 AM  
Huh? I always thought "biscuits" were just cookies, not scones.

Anyway, I think my understanding of British-English is pretty good, thanks to the internet.
 
2012-04-08 10:26:18 AM  
It's used in FARK'ed articles all the time. Some say 15, some say 14, it is the dumbest measurement ever.

Tyrosine: FTA: If the subject of your weight comes up, tread carefully. The British use the word "stone" for their weight. A stone is 14 pounds.

This is the stupidest unit of measure ever. I've never met anyone (British or otherwise) who use this term. Is it really common or is it one of those things a few die-hards who have outlived their usefulness still insist on doing?

 
2012-04-08 10:28:29 AM  

hillary: DuncanMhor: If you are served a biscuit, it will be a scone, not a cookie.

Bollocks. Biscuits are cookies. Scones are scones. No-one in Britain would ever refer to a scone as a biscuit.

But, in turn, Jammy Dodger biscuits are the dog's bollocks.

(let Farkers try to figure that one out)

[upload.wikimedia.org image 250x189]

WOULD YOU CARE FOR SOME TEA?
2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-04-08 10:28:47 AM  
Anyone who doesn't understand Brit-speak just needs to watch more Dr. Who.
 
2012-04-08 10:28:59 AM  

sallys: It's used in FARK'ed articles all the time. Some say 15, some say 14, it is the dumbest measurement ever.

Tyrosine: FTA: If the subject of your weight comes up, tread carefully. The British use the word "stone" for their weight. A stone is 14 pounds.

This is the stupidest unit of measure ever. I've never met anyone (British or otherwise) who use this term. Is it really common or is it one of those things a few die-hards who have outlived their usefulness still insist on doing?


Anyone still have the fark conversion table for this stuff? I thought we had all of those odds and sods figured out one time??
 
2012-04-08 10:31:31 AM  
As far as I know Torrid can mean a hard time, i.e he had a torrid race would been he was either buggered (exhausted), or just made a hard time of it, but not necessary he finished last. Well thats how we use it in New Zealand which is pretty close to UK english.

But you wouldn't use it to say he/she had a good race.
 
2012-04-08 10:34:07 AM  

BolloxReader: Anyone who doesn't understand Brit-speak just needs to watch more Dr. Who.


Not necessarily. The Bill was a great teacher, along with Taggart, A Touch of Frost, and Trial and Retribution. Now it's Casualty, East Enders, and that ongoing soap/show about high school. Those are the shows that you'll learn street-speak. Doctor Who is too aware of its international audience.
 
2012-04-08 10:34:48 AM  
Brilliant = I hate you.
 
2012-04-08 10:36:21 AM  
Another important thing to note is that English pints are 20 ounces. For the first 18 months I was over here, I didn't appreciate that. I thought only Imperial Pints were 20 ounces. That led to some seriously drunken shenanigans when i would have otherwise behaved.
 
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