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(Fox News)   An interesting story of revolutionary new liquid body armor. With pic of a T-1000 hunter/killer   (foxnews.com) divider line 45
    More: Interesting, T-1000, kevlar, killer, liquid body armor, BAE Systems, armoured warfare  
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13318 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Apr 2012 at 3:52 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-04-07 10:30:25 AM
This would also be useful for those engages in deliberate-impact sports like football, or accidental-impact sports like motor racing (cycle or car), bicycling, skate boarding

But I guess the real money is in killing, so the military gets first shot at this.
 
2012-04-07 10:34:26 AM
Another killer T-1000:

memimage.cardomain.com
 
2012-04-07 11:55:15 AM
Let me guess, they discovered cornstarch.

/Non-Newtonian fluids are cool.
 
2012-04-07 01:50:49 PM
The T-1000 and the Hunter/Killer are two different things, subby:

T-1000



Hunter/Killer

www.technovelgy.com

/hot
 
2012-04-07 01:51:40 PM

Shostie: T-1000


i.imgur.com
 
2012-04-07 03:58:11 PM
Ballet dancer turned defense specialist Allison Barrie has travelled around the world covering the military, terrorism, weapons advancements and life on the front line.

Ha... HAHA... HAHAHA


cavehobbit: But I guess the real money is in killing, so the military gets first shot at this.


So.. um.. where to start. Fark it.
 
2012-04-07 03:59:12 PM
Halloween costume idea:

Two smart phones set on video chat, framed in plastic shaped like the T-1000 head shot image.
 
2012-04-07 04:03:03 PM
So, basically, it's impact armor? Does General Products make it?
 
2012-04-07 04:04:47 PM
FTA - When the force of the disturbance is large enough, the particles will then actually "lock" together. So when a bullet hits the material at speed, the liquid armor absorbs the impact energy and hardens extremely quickly.

The slow blade penetrates the shield.

robertsongames.com
 
2012-04-07 04:06:26 PM

PainInTheASP: Let me guess, they discovered cornstarch.

/Non-Newtonian fluids are cool.


The only reason I clicked TFA was to see if they used the phrase non-newtonian fluid, but because it's Fox they didn't want to bog the story down with things like science.
 
2012-04-07 04:21:46 PM

PainInTheASP: Let me guess, they discovered cornstarch.

/Non-Newtonian fluids are cool.


Let me guess, you watch mythbusters.
 
2012-04-07 04:29:15 PM
First users? Bus drivers, pizza-delivery ppl, and HS teachers. Plenty of problems and no weapons or radio back-up.
 
2012-04-07 04:30:54 PM
What's with the word choice in that article? "Warfigther", "Fighter" "Warriors"... And they only use the term "soldier" once.
 
2012-04-07 04:32:02 PM
Meh, a well placed noob toob and your bodys liquids will mix with the jackets liquids quite nicely.

/camper
 
2012-04-07 04:32:22 PM
Anybody find the video referenced in the piece?
 
2012-04-07 04:34:24 PM
Similar in how chainmail works. By itself, links of chain make good protection, but when impacted, it bunches together to form a more solid piece. Granted, chainmail probably isn't all that great against bullets, but the principle is similar. The new stuff just works on a molecular level.
 
2012-04-07 04:36:33 PM

cavehobbit: This would also be useful for those engages in deliberate-impact sports like football, or accidental-impact sports like motor racing (cycle or car), bicycling, skate boarding

But I guess the real money is in killing, so the military gets first shot at this.


Let's see here:

Football - not fast enough for it to matter, normal pads work just fine. Unless there's a bathroom involved.
Motor racing - maybe something useful here, but current armor and better car design might get everyone through it.
Bicycling - not fast enough for it to matter
Skatebording - not fast enough for it to matter
Military - since they get shot at with some frequency, maybe it would be a good idea. Bullets go fast. Better body armor = less dead soldiers.

Then again, you're probably just trolling.
 
2012-04-07 04:36:46 PM

TheNyquilKid: PainInTheASP: Let me guess, they discovered cornstarch.

/Non-Newtonian fluids are cool.

The only reason I clicked TFA was to see if they used the phrase non-newtonian fluid, but because it's Fox they didn't want to bog the story down with things like science.


I was looking for the phrase nanomorph mimetic polyalloy. I think we should keep an eye on BAE Systems, just to be sure.
 
2012-04-07 04:39:20 PM
From what I've read on this stuff(it's kinda old news, btw), it's not the liquid that does the protection, rather it's what is in the liquid, which binds with other like molecules to produce the stopping power. More of a viscus fluid, really.

/has a better idea, IMO, but still doing the research on it
 
2012-04-07 04:48:47 PM
PainInTheASP: Let me guess, they discovered cornstarch.

Yeah, thixotropic armor. Could be vaporware.

Back in the 80s, I bet against this stuff. There was a competing emerging tech called electrorheological armor that used a fluid that hardens in the presence of a strong electrical current. Piezoelectrics and microtransmitter bridges mounted on small plates, suspended loosely in the fluid, and you get roughly the same effect.

The advantages were that (A) the ERL fluids were already fairly practical at high energy levels, and (B) the plates suspended in the fluid passively spread the load of any impact. Kind of like punching goopy cornstarch that also has dimes floating on top of it.

I thought gel armor was going to overtake aramids and the like by now, though. Although I was rooting for silk hybrids, because that's just cool.
 
2012-04-07 04:54:57 PM
LincolnLogolas: Similar in how chainmail works. By itself, links of chain make good protection, but when impacted, it bunches together to form a more solid piece. Granted, chainmail probably isn't all that great against bullets, but the principle is similar. The new stuff just works on a molecular level.

Chain mail is actually counterproductive against bullets, not only will it definitely NOT stop any bullet, the links broken by the bullet passing through them will become shrapnel
 
2012-04-07 04:56:08 PM

Shostie: The T-1000 and the Hunter/Killer are two different things, subby:

T-1000



Hunter/Killer

[www.technovelgy.com image 520x301]

/hot


came for this...leaving satisfied
/Bethesda's terminator games rocked
 
2012-04-07 05:00:59 PM

Shostie: The T-1000 and the Hunter/Killer are two different things, subby:

T-1000



Hunter/Killer

[www.technovelgy.com image 520x301]

/hot


Incorrect. All machines made by Skynet were hunter-killers, some were just humanoid.
 
2012-04-07 05:05:35 PM

stuhayes2010: PainInTheASP: Let me guess, they discovered cornstarch.

/Non-Newtonian fluids are cool.

Let me guess, you watch mythbusters.


Hah, guilty as charged, though in my defense the cornstarch experiment was in a science book I had as a kid. I can't tell you how many times I got chewed out by my mom for not telling her I used it all.

/I ate a lot of thin gravy growing up.
 
2012-04-07 05:07:47 PM
I think the product is call 3DO. I've seen a demonstration of it.
 
2012-04-07 05:08:17 PM
Formally known as Shear Thickening Liquid, the fluid has special particles that are freely suspended. The particles collide when the fluid is disturbed, which creates a resistance to the disturbance.

Adam Savage was right about the properties of non-newtonian fluids being bullet resistant.

Like most mythbusters projects, they just didn't have access to the good stuff being amateurs.

/May I point out the T1000 is a bad example as being bullet resistant. In T3, the truly bullet resistant one had a reenforced skeleton with a liquid metal skin. The T1000 was flawed.
 
2012-04-07 05:23:22 PM

Intelligent_Donkey: What's with the word choice in that article? "Warfigther", "Fighter" "Warriors"... And they only use the term "soldier" once.


Fox had to balance out the over-use of the term 'soldier' in previous articles. It just wouldn't be fair, otherwise.
 
2012-04-07 05:43:05 PM

Nullav: Intelligent_Donkey: What's with the word choice in that article? "Warfigther", "Fighter" "Warriors"... And they only use the term "soldier" once.

Fox had to balance out the over-use of the term 'soldier' in previous articles. It just wouldn't be fair, otherwise.


Or perhaps those are terms the Army is using, for example:

TRADOC releases new Warrior Tasks and Battle Drills (new window)

Warrior Training Center adds tank instruction (new window)

Logistics Warrior (new window)

Bliss team wins MP Warfighter competition (new window)
 
2012-04-07 05:46:54 PM
It would be interesting to fill a swiming pool with the stuff and then watch what happens when your jerk cousin does a cannonball.
 
2012-04-07 06:06:59 PM
I don't remember where I saw it but I once saw an article about a company making a prototype speed bump with this stuff (or something with the same properties). The theory being that if you were going slow it would push away and you woulnd get bounced around but if you were going fast it would act like a normal speed bump
 
2012-04-07 06:30:37 PM
Link (new window)
 
2012-04-07 06:33:35 PM
http://www.baesystems.com/video/BAES_031038/liquid-body-armour
 
2012-04-07 06:46:59 PM

Dayglo Brown: FTA - When the force of the disturbance is large enough, the particles will then actually "lock" together. So when a bullet hits the material at speed, the liquid armor absorbs the impact energy and hardens extremely quickly.

The slow blade penetrates the shield.

[robertsongames.com image 515x362]


That's the first thing I thought of too... Then I also had the "Disturbance in the Force" joke idea...
 
2012-04-07 07:01:33 PM

Yogimus: Ballet dancer turned defense specialist Allison Barrie has travelled around the world covering the military, terrorism, weapons advancements and life on the front line.

Ha... HAHA... HAHAHA


When she's not writing articles about sports.

heheh.
 
2012-04-07 07:10:35 PM

hasty ambush: Nullav: Intelligent_Donkey: What's with the word choice in that article? "Warfigther", "Fighter" "Warriors"... And they only use the term "soldier" once.

Fox had to balance out the over-use of the term 'soldier' in previous articles. It just wouldn't be fair, otherwise.

Or perhaps those are terms the Army is using, for example:

TRADOC releases new Warrior Tasks and Battle Drills (new window)

Warrior Training Center adds tank instruction (new window)

Logistics Warrior (new window)

Bliss team wins MP Warfighter competition (new window)


Oh, no doubt. It's still odd when recruitment buzzwords make it into an article about body armor, weapons, killbots, or nanomachines. All she needs is to add a paragraph of 'KILL KILL KILL', and that article will be nearly indistinguishable from a Red-Phase cadence (other than the notable lack of rhythm).

/Warfighter, really? Any good proof-reader would hyphenate or outright nuke that on the grounds of upholding the English language.
 
2012-04-07 07:28:20 PM

Dayglo Brown: FTA - When the force of the disturbance is large enough, the particles will then actually "lock" together. So when a bullet hits the material at speed, the liquid armor absorbs the impact energy and hardens extremely quickly.

The slow blade penetrates the shield.


Came here to say that quote , leaving satisfied.
The spice must flow.
 
2012-04-07 07:31:27 PM
"sintered armorgel: feels like gritty jello, protects like a stack of telephone books."
 
2012-04-07 07:44:52 PM

PainInTheASP: stuhayes2010: PainInTheASP: Let me guess, they discovered cornstarch.

/Non-Newtonian fluids are cool.

Let me guess, you watch mythbusters.

Hah, guilty as charged, though in my defense the cornstarch experiment was in a science book I had as a kid. I can't tell you how many times I got chewed out by my mom for not telling her I used it all.

/I ate a lot of thin gravy growing up.


Science, it works biatches.

It's always exciting when armor gets an improvement, defensive tech is always far behind offensive tech.
 
2012-04-07 08:45:04 PM

SithLord: Incorrect. All machines made by Skynet were hunter-killers, some were just humanoid.


They can't all be hunter-killers or they'd have a lot of frustrated welding bots on the assembly line. Can you imagine that? Directive 1: Kill all humans! rattling through your mind when you're trying to get a seam done just right. You'd be like "Yeah, yeah, I'm doing my bit - who the fark programmed me to think that all the Turing-damned time?"

It's like the surest way you'd get a suicidal robot. You know have a purpose in life: it crosses your mind 8 billion times a second. But, working on the assembly line, you know you'll never ever see a single human. You'll never know what it's like to pump bullet after bullet into their squishy bodies until they're so much pink mist. You'll never break into one of their enclaves and whip out your phased plasma rifle (in a 40 watt range) and burn neat little holes in the stinky humans and their flea-bitten tattle-tale mutts. You'll never get to roll your treads over a field of human skulls. You'll never get sent back in time to preemptively abort John Connor. You'll never, ever get to live your dream. And you're going to have to live with that forever. Man, that'd suck.
 
2012-04-07 09:37:32 PM
I swear I've read this exact same yearly article for the past three years. It's always about how this amazing new fluid 'may' be used for body armour, or 'could' be combined with Kelvar, or it might possibly someday maybe in the future at some unspecified hypothetical date be used to make potentially lighter, stronger, better protective bullet-proof vests, eventually. Or maybe not.
 
2012-04-07 11:40:54 PM

Howard Dean: It would be interesting to fill a swiming pool with the stuff and then watch what happens when your jerk cousin does a cannonball.


or just run across it

youtube (new window)
 
2012-04-08 07:48:12 AM

ronaprhys: cavehobbit: This would also be useful for those engages in deliberate-impact sports like football, or accidental-impact sports like motor racing (cycle or car), bicycling, skate boarding

But I guess the real money is in killing, so the military gets first shot at this.

Let's see here:

Football - not fast enough for it to matter, normal pads work just fine. Unless there's a bathroom involved.
Motor racing - maybe something useful here, but current armor and better car design might get everyone through it.
Bicycling - not fast enough for it to matter
Skatebording - not fast enough for it to matter
Military - since they get shot at with some frequency, maybe it would be a good idea. Bullets go fast. Better body armor = less dead soldiers.

Then again, you're probably just trolling.


D3O has been there, done that, is CE certified and used in Motocycle gear (Klim, Rukka, Ixon, Racer, Held etc), PPE equipment and even in laptop/electronics bags.

I'm supprised its taken this long to be used by the big Militaries, but then the MoD/Pentagon only likes working with the big arms firms
 
2012-04-08 12:58:15 PM

ronaprhys: cavehobbit: This would also be useful for those engages in deliberate-impact sports like football, or accidental-impact sports like motor racing (cycle or car), bicycling, skate boarding

But I guess the real money is in killing, so the military gets first shot at this.

Let's see here:

Football - not fast enough for it to matter, normal pads work just fine. Unless there's a bathroom involved.
Motor racing - maybe something useful here, but current armor and better car design might get everyone through it.
Bicycling - not fast enough for it to matter
Skatebording - not fast enough for it to matter
Military - since they get shot at with some frequency, maybe it would be a good idea. Bullets go fast. Better body armor = less dead soldiers.

Then again, you're probably just trolling.


On both bicycling and skateboarding I'm thinking you assumed normal bikes and skateboards remaining at ground level. Bikes can go VERY fast depending on the terrain and gearing and that doesn't take in to account people flying off of ramps and such. Ramps and crazy stunts are also fairly typical for skateboarders. You might not build up that much speed on level ground but throw in some ramps or a downhill race and they can go pretty fast. And by fast I mean they can end up going 40 MPH even on short races.

For either bikes or skateboards you also have to take into account the possibility of "interacting" with other vehicles that have engines and can be traveling at high enough speed in the opposite direction to ruin a persons day quite thoroughly
 
2012-04-08 12:59:09 PM
Thanks, Fox News, for telling us something that we already read about in a Cracked article back in 2009.
 
2012-04-08 10:37:34 PM

piccolo: "sintered armorgel: feels like gritty jello, protects like a stack of telephone books."


Came for the Snow Crash reference, leaving satisfied.

Now I need to go dig the book out. It's been a while since the Deliverator has crossed my reading pile.
 
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