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(Mercury News)   Thomas Kinkade gets to find out a little early how accurate all those paintings he did of Heaven were   (mercurynews.com) divider line 407
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12976 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Apr 2012 at 11:42 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-04-07 01:29:17 AM
www.artofthesouth.com

My father inlaw is Pres of the Long Island Light house society and Kincade was going to do the Montauk Lighthouse..... Sad at 54 ... The Yankee stadium one was cool.
 
2012-04-07 01:31:04 AM
I see that fark is apparently populated with fine art connoisseurs, but be that as it may, the guys paintings depicted a peaceful setting that I enjoyed viewing. I've never bought a single piece, but I always enjoyed imagining being in one of those scenes.

/carry on with the snark
 
2012-04-07 01:34:14 AM

Kittypie070: autopsybeverage 2012-04-07 01:12:01 AM

Trackball: As bad of an artist as many of you may say he was...chances are there will be no fark threads when YOU die.

Do you know how I know that you don't understand the fundamental difference between "fame" and "infamy?" I could totally Godwin this thread right now explaining the difference.

/do not Godwin the Kincade thread, do not Godwin the Kincade thread, do not Godwin the Kincade thread...

[mlblogsjaneheller.files.wordpress.com image 411x330]


That's a cool image, but what does it have to do with Nazis?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godwin's_law (new window)
 
2012-04-07 01:34:30 AM
I remember a couple of years ago I read this outstanding review for his movie The Christmas Cottage but unfortunately couldn't find it. So Hopefully you'll just enjoy the linked trailer instead.
 
2012-04-07 01:34:41 AM

KatjaMouse: logic523: As a former custom picture framer, I can't help feeling the worst type of schadenfreude over his death. I HATE his work, and I framed so many prints of his stuff.

I used to frame too and he and the P. Buckley Moss images were our most prolific jobs, but it was the Kinkades that riled us up the most. We were mostly staffed of high school and college kids who were all really into art and art history and we each had such a negative visceral reaction to his work when they'd come in. You really couldn't explain why but it just was. Perhaps because of the poor compositions, the terrible techniques, or the weird perspectives but something was so off about those. I mean, if he were submitting his work to the Vienna Academy of Fine Art in 1907 he'd get kicked out of the portfolio review along with young Hitler.


Sounds like he was paying your bills. You weren't turning the art away, were you?

He at least had enough talent to make art that sold enough to put food on your table. Whiny farking sellouts.
 
2012-04-07 01:34:55 AM

soupbone: I see that fark is apparently populated with fine art connoisseurs, but be that as it may, the guys paintings depicted a peaceful setting that I enjoyed viewing. I've never bought a single piece, but I always enjoyed imagining being in one of those scenes.

/carry on with the snark


Honestly, if you really like Kincaid wait another year or two and the prices will plummet. They are already dropping fast and after the bump up because he has died they will crash even harder. I imagine that within five years you should be able to get most regular prints for a couple of hundred bucks on Ebay. And also the one thing I tell everyone about art...buy it because you like it. That is the only reason. It doesn't matter if everyone else hates it.
 
2012-04-07 01:36:11 AM

Tellingthem: demonfaerie: Tellingthem: demonfaerie: The way he marketed his art was genious, but a lot of his works he did not "create" himself. Yes he did come up with the concept, but he has a lot of artists creating the works for him in mass production. His works priced is based on how much work he put into creating the artwork himself physically and that it has his own unique DNA. So yeah a lot of artists hated him for that. Also didn't he like created little towns for people to actually live in that are based on his artwork?

The funny thing is that lots of artists use others to make "their" artwork. They come up with the design and others bring it to life. Also many artists do extreme numbers of prints. They use the Pp's, Cp's, Ap's, HC's, Roman numerals, Asian edition, European edition, etc to inflate the numbers and cost. Yes the regular run may be 895 but add in all the sizes and proofs and editions and it may turn into 4-5000 total. Kinkade just seemed to take it to the extreme.

See I have no problem with have an artist have like interns to help with their work, especially if its large scale, and doing prints, but Kinkade charged people more if he worked on these prints himself. The more he worked on a print the more he charged, and to me that is genius and a dick at the same time. He made a gimmick to make people pay, and think they are getting something more unique when they are in reality not so much. I am not a huge fan of how he marketed himself even though it was smart. It is just kind of feels like he is exploiting art a bit. Some of his works are beautiful though, even if its full of fluff. I'd rather have his works as actually paintings rather than prints. I don't think he even sold paintings anymore it was just all prints.

Hand embellishing is another common trick is the business. And yes they typically go for thousands more just because the actual artist painted it. Again Kincaid just did it to the extreme.


Stupid ego of his. Those trick in the business really are with commercial artists. Some people debate if its actually art, which to me it is, but it can be very gimmicky with not a lot meaning.
 
2012-04-07 01:37:49 AM

EighthundredmillionthFarker: He at least had enough talent to make art that sold enough to put food on your table. Whiny farking sellouts.


It was a big chain we worked for while I was in high school. Then in college I worked for a tiny private art store with a framing shop and an attached gallery space next door. And considering that this was in a huge art town, I didn't see a single Kinkade in the year and a half I was at that store. I heard tell of one old lady bringing one in once, but I never saw one myself.
 
2012-04-07 01:40:33 AM

Tellingthem: soupbone: I see that fark is apparently populated with fine art connoisseurs, but be that as it may, the guys paintings depicted a peaceful setting that I enjoyed viewing. I've never bought a single piece, but I always enjoyed imagining being in one of those scenes.

/carry on with the snark

Honestly, if you really like Kincaid wait another year or two and the prices will plummet. They are already dropping fast and after the bump up because he has died they will crash even harder. I imagine that within five years you should be able to get most regular prints for a couple of hundred bucks on Ebay. And also the one thing I tell everyone about art...buy it because you like it. That is the only reason. It doesn't matter if everyone else hates it.


I'm sure there is plenty of art out there depicting similar peaceful settings. He may have been a hack in the art world, but I enjoy the simple settings he painted. I admit I know shiat about art, but like you said, it's about personal tastes. I'm not a frothing Kincaid fan at all, I just enjoy the types of scenery he painted.
 
2012-04-07 01:40:40 AM
Every once in a while there's a thread that gives me a gentle reminder that so many of you Farkers are unfairly harsh and critical. Kinkade did what he loved, and he did it at a level that far surpasses anything you basement dwellers could hope to. I never really understood the reasons for entire galleries devoted to his work, but he had a style that had an understandable appeal.

It seems incredibly retarded to refer to him as a no-talent hack. I know people who enjoy his work very much, and I'm sure people have been suckered into paying for something they thought was an investment, but I've never heard people compare Kinkade to anyone truly great. I have a soft spot for Kim Anderson, but that doesn't mean I think he's history's greatest photographer or anything.

If Kinkade is, in fact, a douche as some people have said, I don't see how that adversely affects the way people are supposed to respond to his work. Lennon struck me as kind of a douche, but I don't give a shiat.
 
2012-04-07 01:41:50 AM

soupbone: Tellingthem: soupbone: I see that fark is apparently populated with fine art connoisseurs, but be that as it may, the guys paintings depicted a peaceful setting that I enjoyed viewing. I've never bought a single piece, but I always enjoyed imagining being in one of those scenes.

/carry on with the snark

Honestly, if you really like Kincaid wait another year or two and the prices will plummet. They are already dropping fast and after the bump up because he has died they will crash even harder. I imagine that within five years you should be able to get most regular prints for a couple of hundred bucks on Ebay. And also the one thing I tell everyone about art...buy it because you like it. That is the only reason. It doesn't matter if everyone else hates it.

I'm sure there is plenty of art out there depicting similar peaceful settings. He may have been a hack in the art world, but I enjoy the simple settings he painted. I admit I know shiat about art, but like you said, it's about personal tastes. I'm not a frothing Kincaid fan at all, I just enjoy the types of scenery he painted.


I guess this is obvious with my misspelling of his name.
 
2012-04-07 01:42:07 AM

demonfaerie: Tellingthem: demonfaerie: Tellingthem: demonfaerie: The way he marketed his art was genious, but a lot of his works he did not "create" himself. Yes he did come up with the concept, but he has a lot of artists creating the works for him in mass production. His works priced is based on how much work he put into creating the artwork himself physically and that it has his own unique DNA. So yeah a lot of artists hated him for that. Also didn't he like created little towns for people to actually live in that are based on his artwork?

The funny thing is that lots of artists use others to make "their" artwork. They come up with the design and others bring it to life. Also many artists do extreme numbers of prints. They use the Pp's, Cp's, Ap's, HC's, Roman numerals, Asian edition, European edition, etc to inflate the numbers and cost. Yes the regular run may be 895 but add in all the sizes and proofs and editions and it may turn into 4-5000 total. Kinkade just seemed to take it to the extreme.

See I have no problem with have an artist have like interns to help with their work, especially if its large scale, and doing prints, but Kinkade charged people more if he worked on these prints himself. The more he worked on a print the more he charged, and to me that is genius and a dick at the same time. He made a gimmick to make people pay, and think they are getting something more unique when they are in reality not so much. I am not a huge fan of how he marketed himself even though it was smart. It is just kind of feels like he is exploiting art a bit. Some of his works are beautiful though, even if its full of fluff. I'd rather have his works as actually paintings rather than prints. I don't think he even sold paintings anymore it was just all prints.

Hand embellishing is another common trick is the business. And yes they typically go for thousands more just because the actual artist painted it. Again Kincaid just did it to the extreme.

Stupid ego of his. Those trick in t ...


Yeah the whoring out of the prints does occur mostly in the more commercial realm, but there are many others that most realms of art use. A lot of it is just selling the bs around the painting. Or the size of it. or the artists life story. to shady auction deals, and kickbacks... the art business is a fascinating one and a disturbing one.
 
2012-04-07 01:42:53 AM

EighthundredmillionthFarker: KatjaMouse: logic523: As a former custom picture framer, I can't help feeling the worst type of schadenfreude over his death. I HATE his work, and I framed so many prints of his stuff.

I used to frame too and he and the P. Buckley Moss images were our most prolific jobs, but it was the Kinkades that riled us up the most. We were mostly staffed of high school and college kids who were all really into art and art history and we each had such a negative visceral reaction to his work when they'd come in. You really couldn't explain why but it just was. Perhaps because of the poor compositions, the terrible techniques, or the weird perspectives but something was so off about those. I mean, if he were submitting his work to the Vienna Academy of Fine Art in 1907 he'd get kicked out of the portfolio review along with young Hitler.

Sounds like he was paying your bills. You weren't turning the art away, were you?

He at least had enough talent to make art that sold enough to put food on your table. Whiny farking sellouts.


Wouldn't you get sick of seeing the same thing over and over again? Yes he did help people make money, because people got his work professionally framed. However, a lot of his work looked the same, and was repeated a lot, and staring at it over, and over again can get tiring.

Tellingthem: soupbone: I see that fark is apparently populated with fine art connoisseurs, but be that as it may, the guys paintings depicted a peaceful setting that I enjoyed viewing. I've never bought a single piece, but I always enjoyed imagining being in one of those scenes.

/carry on with the snark

Honestly, if you really like Kincaid wait another year or two and the prices will plummet. They are already dropping fast and after the bump up because he has died they will crash even harder. I imagine that within five years you should be able to get most regular prints for a couple of hundred bucks on Ebay. And also the one thing I tell everyone about art...buy it because you like it. That is the only reason. It doesn't matter if everyone else hates it.


This, and look at the Vogels. Link (new window)
 
2012-04-07 01:46:20 AM
trite [trahyt]

adjective, trit·er, trit·est.

1. lacking in freshness or effectiveness because of constant use or excessive repetition; hackneyed; stale: the trite phrases in his letter.
2. characterized by hackneyed expressions, ideas, etc.: The commencement address was trite and endlessly long.
3. Archaic . rubbed or worn by use.


It's pretty silly how much I hated his work. I mean, I would get a visceral disgust at how much love and praise this man got. My mom loved his stuff. I bet she'll be heartbroken.

/brb, off to call and tell her
 
2012-04-07 01:47:53 AM

Tellingthem: Honestly, if you really like Kincaid wait another year or two and the prices will plummet. They are already dropping fast and after the bump up because he has died they will crash even harder. I imagine that within five years you should be able to get most regular prints for a couple of hundred bucks on Ebay. And also the one thing I tell everyone about art...buy it because you like it. That is the only reason. It doesn't matter if everyone else hates it.


Honestly, this. The only reason Kinkade's work gets the deserved hate it does is mostly the fault of its biggest fans. Those reprints people shell out the bigger bucks for are of only slightly more value, in terms of production value and craftsmanship, than the blacklight weed posters at the head shop down the street. It's when people with no clue treat a decorative accent poster on canvas like it's on the same level as, say, a Matisse or a Van Gogh, that it becomes an object of derision and mockery.
 
2012-04-07 01:48:08 AM

Tellingthem: demonfaerie: Tellingthem: demonfaerie: Tellingthem: demonfaerie: The way he marketed his art was genious, but a lot of his works he did not "create" himself. Yes he did come up with the concept, but he has a lot of artists creating the works for him in mass production. His works priced is based on how much work he put into creating the artwork himself physically and that it has his own unique DNA. So yeah a lot of artists hated him for that. Also didn't he like created little towns for people to actually live in that are based on his artwork?

The funny thing is that lots of artists use others to make "their" artwork. They come up with the design and others bring it to life. Also many artists do extreme numbers of prints. They use the Pp's, Cp's, Ap's, HC's, Roman numerals, Asian edition, European edition, etc to inflate the numbers and cost. Yes the regular run may be 895 but add in all the sizes and proofs and editions and it may turn into 4-5000 total. Kinkade just seemed to take it to the extreme.

See I have no problem with have an artist have like interns to help with their work, especially if its large scale, and doing prints, but Kinkade charged people more if he worked on these prints himself. The more he worked on a print the more he charged, and to me that is genius and a dick at the same time. He made a gimmick to make people pay, and think they are getting something more unique when they are in reality not so much. I am not a huge fan of how he marketed himself even though it was smart. It is just kind of feels like he is exploiting art a bit. Some of his works are beautiful though, even if its full of fluff. I'd rather have his works as actually paintings rather than prints. I don't think he even sold paintings anymore it was just all prints.

Hand embellishing is another common trick is the business. And yes they typically go for thousands more just because the actual artist painted it. Again Kincaid just did it to the extreme.

Stupid ego of his. Tho ...


Yes, especially in gallery settings, I only did stuff at university level, but to get for the gallery is farked up. Museums probably isn't any better though.
 
2012-04-07 01:48:39 AM
we'll see what happens to the two kinkade art galleries in town. personally i think
our village could do with more practical stuff and less art galleries and cutesy crap
shops
 
2012-04-07 01:48:49 AM

andrewagill: Stinkyy: They were cool paintings, but most of the Mc/Wal-Painter of Light stores you saw in malls had only prints. I remember a young lady who bought one for a grand and told me it was an investment. Yeahhhhhhhhhhhhhh.

logic523: As a former custom picture framer, I can't help feeling the worst type of schadenfreude over his death. I HATE his work, and I framed so many prints of his stuff.

You'll both like this.


Oh my god... everything in that video was completely accurate.
 
2012-04-07 01:49:12 AM
These paintings were listed among the 9 completely worthless collectibles Link (new window)

Precious Moments figurines
Hess trucks
Lladro figurines
Hummel figurines
Kinkade paintings
Beanie Babys
Cabbage Patch Kids
Franklin Mint Coins
Norman Rockwell Plates

I hope no one is planning on cashing in on the dead artist thing.
 
2012-04-07 01:49:18 AM

soupbone: soupbone: Tellingthem: soupbone: I see that fark is apparently populated with fine art connoisseurs, but be that as it may, the guys paintings depicted a peaceful setting that I enjoyed viewing. I've never bought a single piece, but I always enjoyed imagining being in one of those scenes.

/carry on with the snark

Honestly, if you really like Kincaid wait another year or two and the prices will plummet. They are already dropping fast and after the bump up because he has died they will crash even harder. I imagine that within five years you should be able to get most regular prints for a couple of hundred bucks on Ebay. And also the one thing I tell everyone about art...buy it because you like it. That is the only reason. It doesn't matter if everyone else hates it.

I'm sure there is plenty of art out there depicting similar peaceful settings. He may have been a hack in the art world, but I enjoy the simple settings he painted. I admit I know shiat about art, but like you said, it's about personal tastes. I'm not a frothing Kincaid fan at all, I just enjoy the types of scenery he painted.

I guess this is obvious with my misspelling of his name.


heh I think i made the same mistake...I wouldn't call him a hack...he just went to the extreme end of the business. He didn't do anything that hasn't been done before business wise but he just went really far with it. He also made some very shady deals (again not uncommon in the business) And seriously most people don't know jack about art. I went to school for it and work in the field and I still don't know much about it.
 
2012-04-07 01:54:23 AM
i196.photobucket.com
 
2012-04-07 01:54:40 AM
"The world of fine art died years ago."

no, you are confusing "conceptual art" and "fine art" with Aesthetics

"Conceptual art is art in which the concept(s) or idea(s) involved in the work take precedence over traditional aesthetic and material concerns."

"Fine art or the fine arts encompass art forms developed primarily for aesthetics and/or concept rather than practical application"

art as "the use of skill and imagination in the creation of aesthetic objects, environments, or experiences that can be shared with others."

you are operating under the fallacy that "art=pretty" conceptual art large chunks referenced in this thread does not require "pretty" or "beautiful" or "pleasing" to be "good"

Oddly enough despite my art education I only consider conceptual art good if it also passes the aesthetic test for me as well. aka "idea + appealing exectution = good"

cheers
 
2012-04-07 01:56:17 AM

Stunt_Cat: These paintings were listed among the 9 completely worthless collectibles Link (new window)

Precious Moments figurines
Hess trucks
Lladro figurines
Hummel figurines
Kinkade paintings
Beanie Babys
Cabbage Patch Kids
Franklin Mint Coins
Norman Rockwell Plates

I hope no one is planning on cashing in on the dead artist thing.


Prints in general are a horrible investment. The majority of them will not be worth much after the artists popularity goes cold. Many prints from the 80's and 90's have lost tons of their value. I know a few people that paid 10-15,000 for a print to now have it worth 500-1000...do not buy art for an investment (especially limited edition anything!) unless you know what you are doing.
 
2012-04-07 01:57:52 AM

demonfaerie: The way he marketed his art was genious, but a lot of his works he did not "create" himself. Yes he did come up with the concept, but he has a lot of artists creating the works for him in mass production. His works priced is based on how much work he put into creating the artwork himself physically and that it has his own unique DNA. So yeah a lot of artists hated him for that. Also didn't he like created little towns for people to actually live in that are based on his artwork?


Lots of artists didn't create much of the work they take credit for. Warhol being a good example, or if you believe the documentary, Mr. Brainwash. And lots of artists do the "touch up a print" and jack the price sky high. Shepard Fairey does this a lot with his works. Limited edition print run, plus HPMs (hand painted multiples), prints on wood, prints on album covers, etc etc. I think its fairly normal with most "mainstream" artists that have a lot of people clamoring for their art, but not enough time or creativity to make zillions of unique images.
 
2012-04-07 01:58:10 AM

soupbone: I see that fark is apparently populated with fine art connoisseurs, but be that as it may, the guys paintings depicted a peaceful setting that I enjoyed viewing. I've never bought a single piece, but I always enjoyed imagining being in one of those scenes.

/carry on with the snark


You know what happened to the last guy who wished himself into a painting.

www.nightgallery.net
 
2012-04-07 01:58:12 AM

Stunt_Cat: I hope no one is planning on cashing in on the dead artist thing.


A few years back when I was in 10 grade my parents took me into a Kinkade gallery and I could see that my dad was completely taken in by the whole "Painting with light" thing. He was more impressed with the street scenes than the cottages and lighthouses (thank god) but ultimately he never bought one. Last year he actually made a passing comment about TK being a scam artist and how lucky he was he never fell for buying any of his work.

If I could find any of his work online, I'd post some paintings by a German artist that my parents did patronize back in the 80s. He also did the whole "painting with light" thing but approached a more impressionist style and combined it with German heritage in the technique. Absolutely gorgeous. Apparently his work goes for a decent price now but my sister and I are likely going to try to hold onto them for sentimental and the aesthetic reasons as well. I also believe he was no where near as prolific an artist and did everything by hand so yeah, I think it would be considered an investment.
 
2012-04-07 01:59:48 AM
Sunday painter
 
2012-04-07 02:06:37 AM
The light that burns twice as schmaltzy, burns half as long.

I've seen things you wouldn't believe... cabins on fire...
 
2012-04-07 02:17:10 AM

ShawnDoc: demonfaerie: The way he marketed his art was genious, but a lot of his works he did not "create" himself. Yes he did come up with the concept, but he has a lot of artists creating the works for him in mass production. His works priced is based on how much work he put into creating the artwork himself physically and that it has his own unique DNA. So yeah a lot of artists hated him for that. Also didn't he like created little towns for people to actually live in that are based on his artwork?

Lots of artists didn't create much of the work they take credit for. Warhol being a good example, or if you believe the documentary, Mr. Brainwash. And lots of artists do the "touch up a print" and jack the price sky high. Shepard Fairey does this a lot with his works. Limited edition print run, plus HPMs (hand painted multiples), prints on wood, prints on album covers, etc etc. I think its fairly normal with most "mainstream" artists that have a lot of people clamoring for their art, but not enough time or creativity to make zillions of unique images.


There are a fair share of artists that have help with their work, but it depends on how it is created. Large scale metal works, where an artist makes small scale models, but has to have someone else do the work does not take away from his work. It all depends on the context, and here Kinkade was able to exploit his fans into buying more expensive pieces of works, than what they were really worth. I cannot say for certain that Warhol was like that, but at least he interacted with other artists, and didn't lie about the process about it. Not saying Kinkade did, but he obviously cared about mass producing art and upping the price.
 
2012-04-07 02:20:22 AM

DeerNuts: logic523: As a former custom picture framer, I can't help feeling the worst type of schadenfreude over his death. I HATE his work, and I framed so many prints of his stuff.

This. It's hard to hold back the vomit and tell that nice hausfrau how beautiful it's going to look. Not to mention biting the tongue very hard when she makes sure to ask for "acid free glass" to keep its value, just like the nice people at the gallery told her to do.

A lot of framers are rejoicing tonight.


I'm surprised at how many framers are on Fark. Former framer myself.

Of course you brought out the box of Museum Glass and assured them that's what they needed. Along with a hand-wrapped mat and a triple stacked frame.
 
2012-04-07 02:21:20 AM

DrMcNinja: FTFA: one of most popular artists in America

...this statement is accurate....but still.....


...and McDonalds is the most popular restaurant in America.
/people have poor taste
 
2012-04-07 02:21:55 AM
Dammitsomuch...another great artist gone too soon!
www.formatmag.com
 
2012-04-07 02:27:47 AM
Something Awful will have to find a new source for its art criticism material I guess.
 
2012-04-07 02:33:07 AM

Bennie Crabtree: Something Awful will have to find a new source for its art criticism material I guess.


Pity, as there seems to be a dearth of shiat art at the moment.
 
2012-04-07 02:33:57 AM
ah ha! so he was the guy who did the "houses/cottages with warm lights emanating from windows in summer and winter" paintings!

some people at work had xmas cards of those on their cubes last xmas. was annoying to walk by and look at everyday.
 
2012-04-07 02:34:54 AM

andrewagill: Stinkyy: They were cool paintings, but most of the Mc/Wal-Painter of Light stores you saw in malls had only prints. I remember a young lady who bought one for a grand and told me it was an investment. Yeahhhhhhhhhhhhhh.

logic523: As a former custom picture framer, I can't help feeling the worst type of schadenfreude over his death. I HATE his work, and I framed so many prints of his stuff.

You'll both like this.


Yeah, that sounds like stuff I heard on at least a weekly basis. There was also Bev Doolitle. I used to call her prints "Wallpaper". It seemed more accurate than "limited edition" when her limited editions were of upwards of 500,000 prints.
 
2012-04-07 02:36:35 AM

teeny: Lennon struck me as kind of a douche, but I don't give a shiat.


And you felt the need to log in and say so?
 
2012-04-07 02:37:59 AM

Trackball: As bad of an artist as many of you may say he was...chances are there will be no fark threads when YOU die.


Not if we do it right. For example, going out peacefully in my sleep like my grandpa. Not screaming like his passengers.
 
2012-04-07 02:38:27 AM
stangelfamily.com
 
2012-04-07 02:39:20 AM

Krikkitbot: Trackball: As bad of an artist as many of you may say he was...chances are there will be no fark threads when YOU die.

Not if we do it right. For example, going out peacefully in my sleep like my grandpa. Not screaming like his passengers.


aw.. shiat that's hilarious!
 
2012-04-07 02:39:23 AM

demonfaerie: ShawnDoc: demonfaerie: The way he marketed his art was genious, but a lot of his works he did not "create" himself. Yes he did come up with the concept, but he has a lot of artists creating the works for him in mass production. His works priced is based on how much work he put into creating the artwork himself physically and that it has his own unique DNA. So yeah a lot of artists hated him for that. Also didn't he like created little towns for people to actually live in that are based on his artwork?

Lots of artists didn't create much of the work they take credit for. Warhol being a good example, or if you believe the documentary, Mr. Brainwash. And lots of artists do the "touch up a print" and jack the price sky high. Shepard Fairey does this a lot with his works. Limited edition print run, plus HPMs (hand painted multiples), prints on wood, prints on album covers, etc etc. I think its fairly normal with most "mainstream" artists that have a lot of people clamoring for their art, but not enough time or creativity to make zillions of unique images.

There are a fair share of artists that have help with their work, but it depends on how it is created. Large scale metal works, where an artist makes small scale models, but has to have someone else do the work does not take away from his work. It all depends on the context, and here Kinkade was able to exploit his fans into buying more expensive pieces of works, than what they were really worth. I cannot say for certain that Warhol was like that, but at least he interacted with other artists, and didn't lie about the process about it. Not saying Kinkade did, but he obviously cared about mass producing art and upping the price.


Helping is one thing but a lot do just have others make the scultpure, painting, etc and then they sign there name to it. It is like an assembly line almost. They give them the sketch and the workers make it a reality. And most modern art publishers use the exact same model on prints. Here is a basic example.

one print.
Regular edition. # 1-500
Collaborators proof # cp1-150
Artist Proof #ap1-50 (hand embellished by the artist)

Regular edition:
first 100 prints: $1000 each
second 100 prints: $1200 each
third 100 prints: $1500 each
fourth 100 prints $2000 each
fifth 100 prints: $2500 each

Cp's (now that the regular print has "sold out")
first 50 prints: $4000 each
second 50 prints: $6000 each
third 50 prints: $10,000 each

AP's hand embellished
first 20 prints: $5000 each
second 20 prints: $10,000 each
last 10 prints: $15,000 each

This is a very basic breakdown of the prices on prints. The editions and prices are all variable but the basic concept is the same. And for most editions that are not hand embellished...they are exactly the same. cp,hc,pp, whatever they are usually made at the same time and the only difference is the number.
 
2012-04-07 02:43:47 AM

Tellingthem: demonfaerie: ShawnDoc: demonfaerie: The way he marketed his art was genious, but a lot of his works he did not "create" himself. Yes he did come up with the concept, but he has a lot of artists creating the works for him in mass production. His works priced is based on how much work he put into creating the artwork himself physically and that it has his own unique DNA. So yeah a lot of artists hated him for that. Also didn't he like created little towns for people to actually live in that are based on his artwork?

Lots of artists didn't create much of the work they take credit for. Warhol being a good example, or if you believe the documentary, Mr. Brainwash. And lots of artists do the "touch up a print" and jack the price sky high. Shepard Fairey does this a lot with his works. Limited edition print run, plus HPMs (hand painted multiples), prints on wood, prints on album covers, etc etc. I think its fairly normal with most "mainstream" artists that have a lot of people clamoring for their art, but not enough time or creativity to make zillions of unique images.

There are a fair share of artists that have help with their work, but it depends on how it is created. Large scale metal works, where an artist makes small scale models, but has to have someone else do the work does not take away from his work. It all depends on the context, and here Kinkade was able to exploit his fans into buying more expensive pieces of works, than what they were really worth. I cannot say for certain that Warhol was like that, but at least he interacted with other artists, and didn't lie about the process about it. Not saying Kinkade did, but he obviously cared about mass producing art and upping the price.

Helping is one thing but a lot do just have others make the scultpure, painting, etc and then they sign there name to it. It is like an assembly line almost. They give them the sketch and the workers make it a reality. And most modern art publishers use the exact same model on ...


Yeah that to me is kind of hacking out art just to make money. It is kind of lame. Also printermakers around the world are weeping.
 
2012-04-07 02:51:28 AM

yoyopro: teeny: Lennon struck me as kind of a douche, but I don't give a shiat.

And you felt the need to log in and say so?


Do you find my example of 'someone whose success overshadowed the douchy parts of his personality' incorrectly placed in my post? I could have used Steve Jobs, or any number of examples. Most people don't give a shiat about the possibility that their favorite painter is kind of an ass.
 
2012-04-07 02:54:48 AM
demonfaerie:

Yes it is. But that is the business. Not everyone one is like that, but most are. The artist's want to get rich and the publishers do to. It's kind of the dirty secret that no one likes to admit to. And I work in the business so I get paid from it. But I still try to be honest with people about it. And maybe someday I'll be able to carve my little niche into it where I can do things a bit differently.
 
2012-04-07 02:58:37 AM

demonfaerie: I cannot say for certain that Warhol was like that, but at least he interacted with other artists, and didn't lie about the process about it.


Warhol in his later years had a team of artists creating work. If he liked the work, he would sign it and claim it as his own. There's now quite a bit of controversy in his later works as experts argue which pieces he actually did, which pieces he contributed the ideas to, and which were made whole cloth by those working under him.

If you watch Exit Through the Gift Shop (and believe it), it shows Mr. Brainwash essentially doing nothing but going through catalogs of art, pointing to works telling art students what to do in the most general terms (Take this photo, but change the colors to look like this painting). Of course, its really unknown how much of that if fact and how much if fiction.
 
2012-04-07 03:08:26 AM

Stunt_Cat: These paintings were listed among the 9 completely worthless collectibles Link (new window)

Precious Moments figurines
Hess trucks
Lladro figurines
Hummel figurines
Kinkade paintings
Beanie Babys
Cabbage Patch Kids
Franklin Mint Coins
Norman Rockwell Plates

I hope no one is planning on cashing in on the dead artist thing.


Well, I am glad to see my M&M collectable dispernsers are holding their value.

didn't click the link

Kinkade wasn't worthy to clean Bob Ross's paint brushes.
 
2012-04-07 03:09:05 AM
What a trifect, James Marshall, Ferdinand Porsche and Thomas Kinkade. Revolutionized rock and roll, revolutionized card design and revolutionized mall art buying.
 
2012-04-07 03:10:17 AM

Krikkitbot: DeerNuts: logic523: As a former custom picture framer, I can't help feeling the worst type of schadenfreude over his death. I HATE his work, and I framed so many prints of his stuff.

This. It's hard to hold back the vomit and tell that nice hausfrau how beautiful it's going to look. Not to mention biting the tongue very hard when she makes sure to ask for "acid free glass" to keep its value, just like the nice people at the gallery told her to do.

A lot of framers are rejoicing tonight.

I'm surprised at how many framers are on Fark. Former framer myself.

Of course you brought out the box of Museum Glass and assured them that's what they needed. Along with a hand-wrapped mat and a triple stacked frame.


Don't I wish. The douches who fell for Tom's bullshiat thought their crap was going to fund their retirement, but freak out over spending more than $100 to frame it.
 
2012-04-07 03:15:47 AM

Myria: I always thought many his pictures were pretty. I don't know what's so horrible about him, besides the Jesus crazy.



His pictures are pretty. And if you had only ever just seen one of them, you probably wouldn't have a problem with them. You notice what's wrong with them more when you've seen a number of them, and they're all the same, all ridiculously exaggerated attempts at creating some sort of homey romantic feeling. Kinkade seems to have gone something like: "Ok, people like the warm glow of light shining out of windows at night? Fine, I'll have every window glowing bright orange like the building was on fire. People like chimneys? BAM! 5 chimneys on every house, all with smoke coming out. Multicolored smoke! People like colorful flowers? BAM, flowers everywhere with every color of the rainbow! And you're damn right there's gonna be a stream running by the house, with a cobblestone bridge. Hell yeah!" I'm not sure if he ever put glowing windows or chimneys on a bridge, but I'm sure he thought about it.

His paintings have been called "cabin porn" because that's what they are. Just as a porn producer has no real creative ability and simply tries to put the most extreme sexual content possible on the screen, and churns out hundreds of movies per year, Kincade gives you the most idealized looking cabin scene imaginable, and then does the same thing 1000 more times.
 
2012-04-07 03:18:24 AM

DeerNuts: Krikkitbot: DeerNuts: logic523: As a former custom picture framer, I can't help feeling the worst type of schadenfreude over his death. I HATE his work, and I framed so many prints of his stuff.

This. It's hard to hold back the vomit and tell that nice hausfrau how beautiful it's going to look. Not to mention biting the tongue very hard when she makes sure to ask for "acid free glass" to keep its value, just like the nice people at the gallery told her to do.

A lot of framers are rejoicing tonight.

I'm surprised at how many framers are on Fark. Former framer myself.

Of course you brought out the box of Museum Glass and assured them that's what they needed. Along with a hand-wrapped mat and a triple stacked frame.

Don't I wish. The douches who fell for Tom's bullshiat thought their crap was going to fund their retirement, but freak out over spending more than $100 to frame it.


Nothing makes me laugh more than seeing someones expensive print in an "Aaron Brothers" frame...
 
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