If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Daily Mail)   $200 DIY house would provide a perfect minimalist existence on any $200,000+ parcel of land you might be lucky enough to find   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 152
    More: Unlikely, pallets, household goods, highest points  
•       •       •

24308 clicks; posted to Main » on 05 Apr 2012 at 10:42 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



152 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-04-06 02:35:53 AM  
Yeah, fark that. I'll take a 300 sq/ft Passivehouse over some shiat like that any day. This is a side project one of our architects came up with and built last year:
farm6.staticflickr.com
Loft area above to sleep. A real toilet and kitchen.
farm6.staticflickr.com
Designed to stay comfortable even in Northern latitudes via passive solar heating, super insulation & proper shading in the summer. With a composting toilet, all you need is a couple of small solar panels and a couple golf cart batteries and you have a pre-fab cabin you can drop off almost anywhere. Link (new window)
 
2012-04-06 02:38:58 AM  

jtown: So...where do I take a shiat?

There's also the issue of insulation. I live in a pretty temperate area but those plastic roofs just wouldn't cut it. I don't know that one would be able to safely generate enough BTUs to keep the place livable when it gets below 40 degrees at night. A home isn't just a flat place to lay down. It has to protect one from the elements and provide for basic needs. The stuff this guy is building isn't alternative housing. It's the kind of forts my friends and I built when we were kids. On a nice night, the 'rents might let us sleep in the fort and we might even get to run an extension cord out there to have light and a radio but they're not fit for living. While I can understand the appeal of microhomes, these aren't them.

I'd be far more impressed if he was designing/building minimalist structures that meet building codes and can actually be lived in.


There are homeless people up in Alaska who live in tents year round.

Also, the creator never says that they are intended to be an alternative to housing. In fact, he even calls it a "tent alternative."
 
2012-04-06 02:40:28 AM  

Mock26: Jument: If there's no place to shiat, it's not a house.

Electricity would also be nice, mind you.

So, all those old "houses" from two centuries ago that had an outhouse out back were not really houses? What, then, were they?


Do you really want to go back two centuries and shiat in an outhouse? Be my guest! Me, I'll take indoor shiatting thank you very much.
 
2012-04-06 02:44:59 AM  
Perfect for the modern trustafarian.

/apparently heated by blistering HDR
 
2012-04-06 02:45:04 AM  
Though not nearly as cheap as these creations, shipping containers really are the ultimate low budget housing. It seriously kind of pisses me off that anyone is homeless when we can easily convert these things to be habitable.

i42.tinypic.com
 
2012-04-06 02:47:27 AM  

Jument: Mock26: Jument: If there's no place to shiat, it's not a house.

Electricity would also be nice, mind you.

So, all those old "houses" from two centuries ago that had an outhouse out back were not really houses? What, then, were they?

Do you really want to go back two centuries and shiat in an outhouse? Be my guest! Me, I'll take indoor shiatting thank you very much.


Funny how you did not answer the actual question. Even more funny that you would someone assume that I would prefer an outhouse to indoor plumbing based on my question. Wonder why that is?

Again, I ask of you, all those old "houses" from two centuries ago that had an outhouse out back were not really houses? What, then, were they?
 
2012-04-06 02:57:48 AM  
How long would you last during a Wisconsin winter in one of those?

That depends. Are you ice fishing and drinking heavily, or homeless and wondering which library or McDonalds you should go to the bathroom at?
 
2012-04-06 03:15:06 AM  

ElizaDoolittle: Krymson Tyde: Where does one shiat/shower/shave in these coffins?

My first thought. And my second was, htf to get the acreage in any safe area with zoning laws. I have a very soft spot for eco-friendly small housing. That is not housing. That's a kennel.


This.

If you can't cook, clean yourself up or go to the bathroom, it's not a house. That's a glorified tent.

You want a cheap small house? Get a travel trailer and park it on your lot.
 
2012-04-06 03:15:09 AM  

vrax: Though not nearly as cheap as these creations, shipping containers really are the ultimate low budget housing. It seriously kind of pisses me off that anyone is homeless when we can easily convert these things to be habitable.


Unless they were food-grade carrying containers here's some of the problems with shipping container housing:

-they are frequently used to haul very nasty chemicals/materials
-their marine based, overseas paints are high in toxins (be it lead, copper and/or asbestos)
-they weren't designed for ventilation
-they're like echo chamber/drums inside
-they roast in the sun
-when it comes to insulation, they typically have none
-their steel walls are terrible against radiant heat transfer
-they're steel, so where you cut them, they'll rust, be sharp.

When it comes down to it, the cost and time of trying to transport and retrofit one of those, let alone a comfortable one, you could much more simply put together 8' long 2x4 stud walls with a nail gun and some hardy board exterior sheeting. With a square, nails and 2x4's one person could layout and assemble walls like that in an afternoon- without making a single cut. Throw in some insulation and plywood interior and you'd have a much more comfortable space. And all of the raw materials would fit in a pickup truck and small trailer vs. needing a tractor trailer to move a shipping container. Container houses are a neat idea, but in reality they take a lot of work and/or expense to make something even reasonably decent.
 
2012-04-06 03:22:31 AM  
It looks like a hot dog cart.
 
2012-04-06 03:23:01 AM  
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-04-06 03:23:23 AM  

Procedural Texture: Or, if you're anywhere near urban Canada, about $1,000,000 for a lot.

/ready-to-burst bubble is still ready to burst


Ha, you mad.
 
2012-04-06 03:24:28 AM  

rickycal78: Trolljegeren: rickycal78: Trolljegeren: [depts.washington.edu image 399x325]
Here are some more from the last Depression - the camps were called Hoovervilles (after Herbert Hoover - I suppose we should call ours Cheney Camps or Bushburgs)

Just call them "presidential estates" because you're sorely mistaken if you think all that nonsense is just Bush and Cheney's faults.

If you can come up with Nixon, Carter, Ford, Reagan, Clinton, and Obama based -burg/-town/-whatever names, this is the place to post them.

I still like "Presidential estates", it covers all the bases without having to get all partisan, and it has that note of satire to it.

Of course I could be biased.


Could just call it "Government Housing". Doesn't discriminate between the president and congress.

Plus has a nice double entente when you compare the quality to that of legitimate section 8 housing.
 
2012-04-06 03:24:33 AM  

cuzsis: ElizaDoolittle: Krymson Tyde: Where does one shiat/shower/shave in these coffins?

My first thought. And my second was, htf to get the acreage in any safe area with zoning laws. I have a very soft spot for eco-friendly small housing. That is not housing. That's a kennel.

This.

If you can't cook, clean yourself up or go to the bathroom, it's not a house. That's a glorified tent.

You want a cheap small house? Get a travel trailer and park it on your lot.


Exactly! And that is what the guy created them to be, glorified tents. He did not create them to be actual homes. Heck, in the article he even states that the first one was created as a place for him to go and write. He also states that his son used one for his first "camp-out."
 
2012-04-06 03:32:43 AM  

Mock26: Jument: Mock26: Jument: If there's no place to shiat, it's not a house.

Electricity would also be nice, mind you.

So, all those old "houses" from two centuries ago that had an outhouse out back were not really houses? What, then, were they?

Do you really want to go back two centuries and shiat in an outhouse? Be my guest! Me, I'll take indoor shiatting thank you very much.

Funny how you did not answer the actual question. Even more funny that you would someone assume that I would prefer an outhouse to indoor plumbing based on my question. Wonder why that is?

Again, I ask of you, all those old "houses" from two centuries ago that had an outhouse out back were not really houses? What, then, were they?


They were houses. As they had a place to sleep, a place to eat, a place to clean yourself up, and a place to go to the bathroom.

Now the toilet may have been outside, but that was for sanitary reasons. However, there was a dedicated spot to go to the bathroom in a manner that didn't "mess where you live" as it were.

These "houses" only have a place to sleep and nothing else. No place to prepare food, no place to cook it, no place to wash up and no place to go to the bathroom. Hence a lot of people saying they aren't "houses".
 
2012-04-06 03:41:42 AM  

Mock26: cuzsis: ElizaDoolittle: Krymson Tyde: Where does one shiat/shower/shave in these coffins?

My first thought. And my second was, htf to get the acreage in any safe area with zoning laws. I have a very soft spot for eco-friendly small housing. That is not housing. That's a kennel.

This.

If you can't cook, clean yourself up or go to the bathroom, it's not a house. That's a glorified tent.

You want a cheap small house? Get a travel trailer and park it on your lot.

Exactly! And that is what the guy created them to be, glorified tents. He did not create them to be actual homes. Heck, in the article he even states that the first one was created as a place for him to go and write. He also states that his son used one for his first "camp-out."


That's great.

However, both subby and the article touted them as "houses" which has a very specific cultural application. They weren't called forts, or "Tent alternatives" or anything like that. They were called houses.

Which they're not. And people are pointing that out.

/article guy may have his head on straight, but journalist obviously doesn't.
 
2012-04-06 03:57:20 AM  
Another vote for "it's a fort".

/It's fun to build a kid's fort with adult construction skills.
 
2012-04-06 03:58:57 AM  

cuzsis: Mock26: cuzsis: ElizaDoolittle: Krymson Tyde: Where does one shiat/shower/shave in these coffins?

My first thought. And my second was, htf to get the acreage in any safe area with zoning laws. I have a very soft spot for eco-friendly small housing. That is not housing. That's a kennel.

This.

If you can't cook, clean yourself up or go to the bathroom, it's not a house. That's a glorified tent.

You want a cheap small house? Get a travel trailer and park it on your lot.

Exactly! And that is what the guy created them to be, glorified tents. He did not create them to be actual homes. Heck, in the article he even states that the first one was created as a place for him to go and write. He also states that his son used one for his first "camp-out."

That's great.

However, both subby and the article touted them as "houses" which has a very specific cultural application. They weren't called forts, or "Tent alternatives" or anything like that. They were called houses.

Which they're not. And people are pointing that out.

/article guy may have his head on straight, but journalist obviously doesn't.


Very true. The article and subby billed them as houses. The creator of them, however, did not.

/Agree on creator-journalist head-straight point.
 
2012-04-06 04:11:34 AM  

Ponzholio: [cementtrust.files.wordpress.com image 296x448]

Look here, these walls aren't even insulated. I don't know what the inspector was even looking at. Tear it down. Tear it all down...


Awesome. Mike Holmes for Governor General!!!
 
2012-04-06 05:45:12 AM  
i.imgur.com
 
2012-04-06 06:26:41 AM  

the ha ha guy: wildcardjack: Ideally, people would live in the uppers stories of the places they work, eliminating the need to transport the populace every day.

Given the ratio of housing area to work area, that's simply not feasible, unless the living quarters are built similar to what Foxconn built for their employees.

[i.imgur.com image 640x426]


Mere double-decker bunks beds??? Amateur stuff. Try joining the Navy and protecting the free world.
 
2012-04-06 06:39:57 AM  

wildcardjack: This is an example of how people COULD live in close proximity and have individual property but instead we have a society built around "places we can afford to live" versus "places where we work vs where we live"

Ideally, people would live in the uppers stories of the places they work, eliminating the need to transport the populace every day.

But that doesn't work in our economy, does it...


Ideally, you would not be running a society in which I would wish to live.

That being said, yeah, my grandparents were immigrants and they lived in back of a little grocery store they ran up in the Chicago area, rented out the upstairs. Visited when I was a kid. Would I ever consider living there? Not unless I was like them, and I basically had to.
 
2012-04-06 06:53:09 AM  

vudukungfu: Molavian: How long would you last during a Wisconsin winter in one of those?

Friend of mine (new window) would like a word.


Oh, yeah- Mr. "Tiny House" philosopher spouts all the duty buzzwords......and his stuff isn't any more practical or desirable than the way we live now. Yeah, I'd really love to see him in charge, a Pol Pot for the 21st century. Everyone forced to live on the land? Can't even get past pencil & paper with that one....7 billion people, each on an acre of land that can support them. Yep. That'll work.
 
2012-04-06 07:23:43 AM  
You squatters over a Presidential Estates better keep your raggedy asses off the lawns over here at Presidential Heights, our homes are valued at least 20% higher than yours. At least you can look down on those slobs living out of trash bags over in Presidential Hills at Cliff's Edge.
 
2012-04-06 07:38:47 AM  

MrSteve007: Yeah, fark that. I'll take a 300 sq/ft Passivehouse over some shiat like that any day. This is a side project one of our architects came up with and built last year:
[farm6.staticflickr.com image 640x426]
Loft area above to sleep. A real toilet and kitchen.
[farm6.staticflickr.com image 640x427]
Designed to stay comfortable even in Northern latitudes via passive solar heating, super insulation & proper shading in the summer. With a composting toilet, all you need is a couple of small solar panels and a couple golf cart batteries and you have a pre-fab cabin you can drop off almost anywhere. Link (new window)


I don't understand why the people that design these don't put in hooks for hammock rather than having to climb a ladder to get to a mushed up bedroom. Hammocks are wonderful and in the morning you just unhook on one side and you get all your living space back again.
I have a hammock for my primary bed and it is the most comfortable, restful night's sleep.
 
2012-04-06 07:39:35 AM  

King Something: You know who else had huge tracts of land?


www.intriguing.com

?
 
2012-04-06 07:46:48 AM  
We have those in the UK. They're called sheds, we store crap in them... old men turn them in to little workshops for themselves and stuff.

You don't, generally speaking, live in a shed.
 
2012-04-06 08:15:15 AM  

BigBurrito: 2wolves: Go through a North Dakota winter in one of those and then email me about your great $200 house.


Winter is not the difficulty, summer would be. In winter the transparent roof would collect quite a bit of heat from the sun, however, in summer you would cook.


And at night, it would turn into a block of ice as all the heat escapes through the lack of insulation.
 
2012-04-06 08:23:46 AM  

vrax: Though not nearly as cheap as these creations, shipping containers really are the ultimate low budget housing. It seriously kind of pisses me off that anyone is homeless when we can easily convert these things to be habitable.

[i42.tinypic.com image 640x480]


Homeless is not often due to lack of funds or desire to give people funds.

Mental illness is a hell of a drug.

And when it isn't, those things still require a great deal of cash. Yeah, not much, but when you don't even have 'not much' it might as well cost $100k.

(Consider lot costs, waste disposal, water, electricity, etc and the hookup costs)
 
2012-04-06 08:29:47 AM  

MrSteve007: vrax: Though not nearly as cheap as these creations, shipping containers really are the ultimate low budget housing. It seriously kind of pisses me off that anyone is homeless when we can easily convert these things to be habitable.

Unless they were food-grade carrying containers here's some of the problems with shipping container housing:

-they are frequently used to haul very nasty chemicals/materials
-their marine based, overseas paints are high in toxins (be it lead, copper and/or asbestos)
-they weren't designed for ventilation
-they're like echo chamber/drums inside
-they roast in the sun
-when it comes to insulation, they typically have none
-their steel walls are terrible against radiant heat transfer
-they're steel, so where you cut them, they'll rust, be sharp.

When it comes down to it, the cost and time of trying to transport and retrofit one of those, let alone a comfortable one, you could much more simply put together 8' long 2x4 stud walls with a nail gun and some hardy board exterior sheeting. With a square, nails and 2x4's one person could layout and assemble walls like that in an afternoon- without making a single cut. Throw in some insulation and plywood interior and you'd have a much more comfortable space. And all of the raw materials would fit in a pickup truck and small trailer vs. needing a tractor trailer to move a shipping container. Container houses are a neat idea, but in reality they take a lot of work and/or expense to make something even reasonably decent.


They do have a few advantages:

The structure/design is known. This makes permitting MUCH easier. You aren't going to get a permit for a home made home unless you copy a home that already exists. And even then, expect to have to pay a lot for the inspections to get that permit.

The shipping container provides a good 'inspect once' repeat many type of permitting process. Especially if you aren't stacking them.

And you CAN stack them and again, permitting is easier since they are supposed to stack with a lot of weight on them, which allows for a much easier second floor.

And one BIG factor is that if you don't mess with the exterior much, it can be loaded onto a truck and shipped to your location with as low of a cost as you will ever see. (Or, load up the container with all the materials you intend to use to customize it, and ship THAT to the site. Minimal shipping cost.
 
2012-04-06 09:08:38 AM  
upload.wikimedia.org

The future of the western world. At least the bankers will still be getting their 8-figure bonuses.
 
2012-04-06 09:13:07 AM  
The Hickshaw is actually pretty cute. Wouldn't live in it, but it's cute. Seriously. Not even big enough to be considered a camper.

/inheriting land some day, so affording that wouldn't be problematic.
//Trouble is, the land is in southern Indiana. Ew.
 
2012-04-06 09:13:23 AM  
If a jail cell is bigger than your house, you don't have a house.
 
2012-04-06 09:16:44 AM  

Magic_Button: Trustfund Hippy ...Yea !

/Rant On

Bet the moran has not spent more then 4 hours in his "houses"

As someone pointed out there is no weather stripping or insulation or proper ventilation, given a month his "house" would be bug infested moldy and damp , destroying any of the occupants food and possessions and slowly becoming a coffin on wheels. He is not only a retard , he is a dangerous retard because the right wing would look at these pieces of crap and think that the poor and the homeless are just not boot-strappy enough to solve their own problems and loopy leftys would think they are "helping" by employing themselves in giving talks and "designing" and advocating this garbage and think they would be helping the homeless or anyone by pushing this crap ..
Cardboard box would be better . He should be raped by hobos for being the tard that he is

/ was homeless for a number of years
// Rant off


Wow. Interesting take.

/Didn't think of it from that angle.
//Reconsidering
 
2012-04-06 09:30:43 AM  

vudukungfu: jaytkay: Google "teardrop trailer" if this is relevant to your interests
[www.roamingtimes.com image 430x289]
[tinyhouseblog.com image 430x323]
[www.cozycruiser.com image 430x323]

My cuz in Cali refurbished one of those.
Him and his wife drive it all over.
I saw it in NJ at a Family reunion.
Rocks balls.
Them things are the silver deer turds of the highways.
/Rock on.
//Jimmy Dean.
///Rock on.


Redneck haiku...
 
2012-04-06 09:37:13 AM  

vudukungfu: Molavian: How long would you last during a Wisconsin winter in one of those?

Friend of mine (new window) would like a word.


What does that have to do with anything? That guy looks like he makes real houses, just smaller.
 
2012-04-06 10:34:30 AM  

the ha ha guy: wildcardjack: Ideally, people would live in the uppers stories of the places they work, eliminating the need to transport the populace every day.

Given the ratio of housing area to work area, that's simply not feasible, unless the living quarters are built similar to what Foxconn built for their employees.

[i.imgur.com image 640x426]


Build more stories!
 
2012-04-06 10:53:51 AM  
If you live a place with low population, you can drum up interest in just about anything. Why this particular backyard hammer-job has reached my laptop in the middle of the city of Philadelphia is a problem I need to look into.
 
2012-04-06 11:07:46 AM  

moike


Burt Munro laughs at your crappy little shed you can't even fit a proper motorbike in...


Well done.

BRB, need to go water the tree.
 
2012-04-06 11:13:48 AM  

American Decency Association: Sgygus: That's not a house.

yeah, being able to push something over disqualifies it from being a house


You big bad wolf you.
 
2012-04-06 11:23:44 AM  

kim jong-un: The structure/design is known. This makes permitting MUCH easier. You aren't going to get a permit for a home made home unless you copy a home that already exists. And even then, expect to have to pay a lot for the inspections to get that permit.


When it comes to structural, permitting is stupid simple - especially on a small structure. Just place your 2x4s 16-inches on center, include a sill plate and double top plate = done. That's all you need on the load bearing walls on the exterior. Roof trusses a tiny bit more complicated @ 24-inches on center. If you really want to get efficient, but a little more complicated - you go with advanced framing.Link (new window)

I built my 24'x36' shop this way, and it only took a quick glance of the blueprints from the permitting office to get my plans approved. With two friends, it took me a weekend to build and put up the walls/roof (the concrete slab and pony walls were already in place). It's more of a hassle to get electrical permitting taken care of than structural, but even then it isn't that hard. I passed inspection the first time, and I'm by no means an electrician.

As for transportation issues, you'd be much, much better off building a tumbleweed/tiny house. Heck, they're built on a trailer with a hitch, so you can tow them yourself. They're releasing a movie this summer (new window) about how a kid, with no building experience, built his own tiny home on a minuscule budget. Looks to be a pretty good film.
 
2012-04-06 12:29:33 PM  

MrSteve007: Yeah, fark that. I'll take a 300 sq/ft Passivehouse over some shiat like that any day. This is a side project one of our architects came up with and built last year:
[farm6.staticflickr.com image 640x426]
Loft area above to sleep. A real toilet and kitchen.
[farm6.staticflickr.com image 640x427]
Designed to stay comfortable even in Northern latitudes via passive solar heating, super insulation & proper shading in the summer. With a composting toilet, all you need is a couple of small solar panels and a couple golf cart batteries and you have a pre-fab cabin you can drop off almost anywhere. Link (new window)


I have a keen interest in Passive Houses, Earth Ships, etc. so this is relevant to my interests. Thanks much.
 
2012-04-06 04:12:29 PM  
If you were to say to the grown-ups: "I saw a beautiful house made of rosy brick, with geraniums in the windows and doves on the roof," they would not be able to get any idea of that house at all. You would have to say to them: "I saw a house that cost $20,000." Then they would exclaim: "Oh, what a pretty house that is!"

/The Little Prince
 
2012-04-06 06:51:24 PM  

toejam: [upload.wikimedia.org image 300x224]


Hahahaha, nice!
 
2012-04-06 09:28:41 PM  

MicroE: Holy HDR


First thing I thought of.
 
2012-04-06 11:07:47 PM  

vudukungfu: Molavian: How long would you last during a Wisconsin winter in one of those?

Friend of mine (new window) would like a word.


Your friend builds crappy little houses....

I suppose they might be adequate for camping.
 
2012-04-06 11:17:54 PM  

Mock26: Lsherm: Mock26: Lsherm: Mock26: Lsherm: BigBurrito: 2wolves: Go through a North Dakota winter in one of those and then email me about your great $200 house.


Winter is not the difficulty, summer would be. In winter the transparent roof would collect quite a bit of heat from the sun, however, in summer you would cook.

That was my complaint. Yeah, you get light, but that thing will farking cook you during the day, even with open windows.

He should redesign it with interchangeable roofs and take some goddamn thermodynamics courses. Even as a replacement for a tent it would suck ass if you wanted to use it during the day. You'd be better off with a tent.

Just drag your house into the shade of a tree. That will stop the solar cooking.

No, it won't.

You knew that, didn't you?

Have you ever been standing in the sun on a really hot day and then moved into the shade? It was cooler in the shade, right? Every parked your car out in the open under the sun on a hot day and then gotten inside? Ever done parked your car in the shade on a hot day and then gotten inside? Which was cooler? I will give you a hint: It was not the car that had been sitting in the sun all day.

Direct sunlight, kind of funny that way, eh?

*sigh*

I guess you didn't.

The assertion was that the transparent roof would collect too much heat and turn the hut into an oven during the summer. So what is the difference between putting on a non-transparent roof and moving it into the shade? Go ahead, enlighten me.


DAMMIT! I hate when well known trolls say stupid things. I remember a guy named after a specific brand of tea tried to tell me that he pissed and shiat on somebody's A/C compressor and expected me to believe that the odor was then forced into their home. I even called him on it and he confirmed what he was saying. He was banned shortly thereafter on a completely unrelated note.
 
2012-04-06 11:24:07 PM  

vrax: Though not nearly as cheap as these creations, shipping containers really are the ultimate low budget housing. It seriously kind of pisses me off that anyone is homeless when we can easily convert these things to be habitable.

[i42.tinypic.com image 640x480]


Homeless is a choice usually, they choose a vice over shelter. My city is a local mecca for the homeless because of an over abundance of missions and soup kitchens and social welfare dollars. The adult homeless are able bodied....because if they werent they would likely be eligible for SSID. If they have children they are eligible for enough child based aid to rent just about any apartment in town.

I know I will get flamed for being insensitive, but I also know my cheapest apartments are $375 a month plus electric. And adult with a disability that prevents them from working can get on SSID for about $600 a month. Then foodstamps add about $200 a month. They can get low income utility assistance for the small electric bill. I know this because I rent to a dozen people in that situation.

I also know that it takes a while to find a stable tenant who is in that income bracket. We rent to former homeless people with assistance from a local welfare program. About 1in 10 works out because they cannot give up the vices that causes the homelessness in the first place.

Also, lack of adequate low cost housing is not actually a problem. There is an overage of housing in the Country right now. The problem is that it is not local to where teh homeless or very low income people are. It doesnt make any sense for there to be poor people anywhere near a major city. Urban Price inflation puts stress on their fixed income.

The other problem is over regulation, cheap housing is by its nature older, run down, and in need of serious rehab. That is why its cheap. If you try to regulate it to the point that it is quality housing it is no longer cheap. You cant have both in any sort of sustainable market. You want the homeless and poor to live in really nice houses, you pay out the ass for it in public money. Also there is never enough public housing. You may be surprised to learn that public housing is not a right. Local HUD programs can and do refuse applicants for a host of reasons. Those people have no choice but to look for housing in the private market which is under pressure to conform to building codes and quality requirements. Prices have to go up, which means welfare dollars that could go to other things go to housing.

Tearing down old homes to replace them with premanufactured coffins for the poor is not a solution, its actually been tried for 80 years in different shapes and materials. It always turns into a hellish pogrom.

So take your pick, pay more taxes so the poor can be taken care of by local governments or get comfortable with the fact that they will live in an older apartment without luxuries.
 
2012-04-07 12:24:49 AM  

Mock26: Jument: Mock26: Jument: If there's no place to shiat, it's not a house.

Electricity would also be nice, mind you.

So, all those old "houses" from two centuries ago that had an outhouse out back were not really houses? What, then, were they?

Do you really want to go back two centuries and shiat in an outhouse? Be my guest! Me, I'll take indoor shiatting thank you very much.

Funny how you did not answer the actual question. Even more funny that you would someone assume that I would prefer an outhouse to indoor plumbing based on my question. Wonder why that is?

Again, I ask of you, all those old "houses" from two centuries ago that had an outhouse out back were not really houses? What, then, were they?


Fine: they were two century old houses. A lot changes in two centuries. Would you pit a model T against a car from 2012? Times change.
 
2012-04-07 12:46:50 AM  

Jument: Mock26: Jument: Mock26: Jument: If there's no place to shiat, it's not a house.

Electricity would also be nice, mind you.

So, all those old "houses" from two centuries ago that had an outhouse out back were not really houses? What, then, were they?

Do you really want to go back two centuries and shiat in an outhouse? Be my guest! Me, I'll take indoor shiatting thank you very much.

Funny how you did not answer the actual question. Even more funny that you would someone assume that I would prefer an outhouse to indoor plumbing based on my question. Wonder why that is?

Again, I ask of you, all those old "houses" from two centuries ago that had an outhouse out back were not really houses? What, then, were they?

Fine: they were two century old houses. A lot changes in two centuries. Would you pit a model T against a car from 2012? Times change.


No. But a model T is still a car.
 
Displayed 50 of 152 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report