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(Huffington Post)   In the chaos that was Hurricane Katrina; justice has finally been done in a case of injustice   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 104
    More: Followup, Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans, mandatory minimum, Rodney King, federal judges, shootings  
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9116 clicks; posted to Main » on 05 Apr 2012 at 1:42 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-04-05 04:13:33 AM
"....like handing out speeding tickets at the Indy 500"

Plagiarist. Meat of the quote is from Capt. Willard. Give credit where credit is due. The horror.
 
2012-04-05 04:14:31 AM

digistil: What are you trying to say? Prisons are competing with the Catholic Church for employees?


You mean employees that does deliberate indifference to such crimes and employing methods such as shuffling the perpetrators around rather than directly addressing the problem?

If you ask that question and answer it rhetorically, it should answer yours.
 
2012-04-05 04:19:22 AM

TuteTibiImperes: Enemabag Jones: AverageAmericanGuy,We are trying them with the benefit of cooler heads and with perfect hindsight, but in those frightful moments with the sound of gunshots coming from within the crowd, we are holding these officers to superhuman standards that they weren't able to live up to. They were panicked humans with guns that day, and people died.

And then instead of being honest about it covered it up to the maxium degree possible.

Would you be as sympathetic if they were not wearing tin badges?

Personally, I would. In times of disaster sometimes people do stupid things. I'm not saying they should get off scot free, but any sentences like this for people who had been upstanding citizens up until they were faced with an unimaginable situation just proves that our justice system is more about retribution than rehabilitation.

These sentences might as well be life. If you manage you survive prison for 38 years what is going to be left for you when you get out? The world will have left you behind and you'll be too old to make anything of yourself with a felony record anyway.

A lot of people died in Katrina, and it's awful that the men these guys shot had to die at the hands of the police and not the storm, but destroying more lives over an error in judgment in the heat of a moment is just adding more victims to the bonfire.

Really, I'd be for setting the maximum sentence for anything short of premeditated serial murder at 10 years. Give people the chance to repent and rehabilitate instead of just throwing them away to appease the masses.


Um, no. I don't care if they were "upstanding citizens" who loved puppies and rainbows before shooting fleeing, unarmed people and then conspiring to cover up the crime (attempting - fortunately unsuccessfully - to send one of the victims to prison for attempted murder of a police officer.)

Even if you accept that shooting conceivably could have been an unfortunate error in a desperate situation (which I don't - they shot and killed a severely mentally disabled man who was running away) the coverup was a disgusting crime that merits life in prison. Seriously, read this (new window) and tell me that cops who behave like that shouldn't be locked up for life.
 
2012-04-05 04:22:00 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: This is why I like living in the Pacific Northwest.
Not a lot of black people to be nasty to.


Well yeah, but you have hippies. *shudder*
 
2012-04-05 05:10:51 AM
This sounds a little like the story I heard once (no, I don't have a link) where a guy drove another guy to rob a bank, the robber shot someone and got 25 years, and the driver got the same charge PLUS he got life for conspiracy. So, the government is saying conspiracy is worse than the actual crime?
 
2012-04-05 05:40:37 AM

geek_mars: For all the "we should be sympathetic" folks out there, consider this: Not only did they pull a massive cover up to protect themselves, they tried to send an innocent man to prison. They actually had him arrested and jailed, but, thankfully, a judge released him after just a few weeks. The shooting may have been a tragic mistake, and perhaps, considering the circumstances, wouldn't have warranted imprisonment, but when you pin your crimes on an innocent man you deserve your life sentence.
Frankly, they're lucky that cops don't have to go to general population, or they wouldn't have to worry about how long their sentences were, because, assuming they go to prison in Louisiana, they'd probably be dead in less than a year.


www.jamesjoyce.co.uk
 
2012-04-05 06:44:59 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: In a panicked situation, those with guns will take steps to ensure their own safety and the safety of those closest to them, sometimes to the detriment and death of others.

I wish they had kept their cool and subdued the rioting crowds using logic and reason, but those people on that bridge weren't about to be subdued so easily.

We are trying them with the benefit of cooler heads and with perfect hindsight, but in those frightful moments with the sound of gunshots coming from within the crowd, we are holding these officers to superhuman standards that they weren't able to live up to. They were panicked humans with guns that day, and people died.


Sorry but "heard a gunshot in the crowd" is not an excuse to start mowing down a crowd.
 
2012-04-05 06:45:58 AM
Good. Nothing a bad cop deserves more than time in prison.
 
2012-04-05 06:46:01 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: In a panicked situation, those with guns will take steps to ensure their own safety and the safety of those closest to them, sometimes to the detriment and death of others.

I wish they had kept their cool and subdued the rioting crowds using logic and reason, but those people on that bridge weren't about to be subdued so easily.

We are trying them with the benefit of cooler heads and with perfect hindsight, but in those frightful moments with the sound of gunshots coming from within the crowd, we are holding these officers to superhuman standards that they weren't able to live up to. They were panicked humans with guns that day, and people died.


Hell, you're also forgetting the MASSIVE COVERUP. Yes, I'm sure they were totally justified, in the heat of the moment... Except, why, then, would they cover it up and send an innocent man to prison if they're so innocent?
 
2012-04-05 06:46:55 AM

LavenderWolf: AverageAmericanGuy: In a panicked situation, those with guns will take steps to ensure their own safety and the safety of those closest to them, sometimes to the detriment and death of others.

I wish they had kept their cool and subdued the rioting crowds using logic and reason, but those people on that bridge weren't about to be subdued so easily.

We are trying them with the benefit of cooler heads and with perfect hindsight, but in those frightful moments with the sound of gunshots coming from within the crowd, we are holding these officers to superhuman standards that they weren't able to live up to. They were panicked humans with guns that day, and people died.

Sorry but "heard a gunshot in the crowd" is not an excuse to start mowing down a crowd.


Yes, in hindsight and with the benefit of calm heads, that is absolutely correct.
 
2012-04-05 06:47:11 AM

Smoking GNU: geek_mars: For all the "we should be sympathetic" folks out there, consider this: Not only did they pull a massive cover up to protect themselves, they tried to send an innocent man to prison. They actually had him arrested and jailed, but, thankfully, a judge released him after just a few weeks. The shooting may have been a tragic mistake, and perhaps, considering the circumstances, wouldn't have warranted imprisonment, but when you pin your crimes on an innocent man you deserve your life sentence.
Frankly, they're lucky that cops don't have to go to general population, or they wouldn't have to worry about how long their sentences were, because, assuming they go to prison in Louisiana, they'd probably be dead in less than a year.

[www.jamesjoyce.co.uk image 340x480]


BTW... This.
 
2012-04-05 06:49:58 AM

LavenderWolf: AverageAmericanGuy: In a panicked situation, those with guns will take steps to ensure their own safety and the safety of those closest to them, sometimes to the detriment and death of others.

I wish they had kept their cool and subdued the rioting crowds using logic and reason, but those people on that bridge weren't about to be subdued so easily.

We are trying them with the benefit of cooler heads and with perfect hindsight, but in those frightful moments with the sound of gunshots coming from within the crowd, we are holding these officers to superhuman standards that they weren't able to live up to. They were panicked humans with guns that day, and people died.

Hell, you're also forgetting the MASSIVE COVERUP. Yes, I'm sure they were totally justified, in the heat of the moment... Except, why, then, would they cover it up and send an innocent man to prison if they're so innocent?


You'll notice that I never mentioned anything about the cover up. That is because the sentence is about the shooting, not the cover up.

The cover up is a red herring here. It was a terrible thing, and the police should definitely be forced to face up to that, but it is separate from the shooting.

Unless I misread the article, which is wholly possible.
 
2012-04-05 07:07:03 AM
My thanks to this judge. Hopefully, the same judge will be given the BP disaster lawsuits.
 
2012-04-05 07:28:50 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: In a panicked situation, those with guns will take steps to ensure their own safety and the safety of those closest to them, sometimes to the detriment and death of others.

I wish they had kept their cool and subdued the rioting crowds using logic and reason, but those people on that bridge weren't about to be subdued so easily.

We are trying them with the benefit of cooler heads and with perfect hindsight, but in those frightful moments with the sound of gunshots coming from within the crowd, we are holding these officers to superhuman standards that they weren't able to live up to. They were panicked humans with guns that day, and people died.


Shut up moron.
 
2012-04-05 07:37:25 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: In a panicked situation, those with guns will take steps to ensure their own safety and the safety of those closest to them, sometimes to the detriment and death of others.

I wish they had kept their cool and subdued the rioting crowds using logic and reason, but those people on that bridge weren't about to be subdued so easily.

We are trying them with the benefit of cooler heads and with perfect hindsight, but in those frightful moments with the sound of gunshots coming from within the crowd, we are holding these officers to superhuman standards that they weren't able to live up to. They were panicked humans with guns that day, and people died.


Was there really the sound of gunshots from the crowd or ar a) you making that up b) the policeofficers who lied about everything else making it up ?
 
2012-04-05 08:09:57 AM
So, did it happen like this?


The call: "B-B-Black people are crossing the bridge! They're going to start knocking on our doors. Are there no liquor stores? Are there no Superdomes? Send them back. Send them back!"

The response: "Folks. FOLKS! You're scaring the white people living in dry comfort across this bridge. I'm going to ask you to go back to your fetid death swamps. FEMA will be with you in about a month. THAT WAS YOUR LAST WARNING."

/Open fire. Start with the gimp.
 
2012-04-05 08:24:44 AM
the place was a madhouse with a missing loony Farktard as the mayor.

But the cover up and jailing of an innocent meant they knew they had screwed the pooch.
The local PD lost at least half it's officers. And there were some serious piles of crap in uniform breaking the laws because they could.
I got sent there
I found only the pets worth helping.
But I'm glad these tools got something instead of freedom
and I hope they enjoy general pop.
 
2012-04-05 08:52:22 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: LavenderWolf: AverageAmericanGuy: In a panicked situation, those with guns will take steps to ensure their own safety and the safety of those closest to them, sometimes to the detriment and death of others.

I wish they had kept their cool and subdued the rioting crowds using logic and reason, but those people on that bridge weren't about to be subdued so easily.

We are trying them with the benefit of cooler heads and with perfect hindsight, but in those frightful moments with the sound of gunshots coming from within the crowd, we are holding these officers to superhuman standards that they weren't able to live up to. They were panicked humans with guns that day, and people died.

Hell, you're also forgetting the MASSIVE COVERUP. Yes, I'm sure they were totally justified, in the heat of the moment... Except, why, then, would they cover it up and send an innocent man to prison if they're so innocent?

You'll notice that I never mentioned anything about the cover up. That is because the sentence is about the shooting, not the cover up.

The cover up is a red herring here. It was a terrible thing, and the police should definitely be forced to face up to that, but it is separate from the shooting.

Unless I misread the article, which is wholly possible.


You did, entirely. Not stop posting, moron.
 
2012-04-05 08:55:18 AM
You mean to say a city run by bunglers and thieves has a corrupt police department?

[clutchingmypearls.jpg]

If you do a search for "Antoinette Frank" you'll find even more charming New Orleans police tales.
 
2012-04-05 09:09:59 AM
coont4: The Shatner Incident: I_C_Weener: Good.

This. I hope their assholes look like pink socks after a few years in the clink.

/give them a taste of the current justice system they loved so much
//sweet for us
///wormwood for them

Seriously!

I hope they are repeatedly raped with a splintered broom stick that has been soaking in salt water for a week. Then after that happens they should be forced to swallow the bodily fluids of the entire prison for a whole day. Once they're done with that they should have their testicles chopped off and force fed to each other. If they're still conscious at this point they should be slowly burned alive with a soldering iron.

Yeah. That's justice. That;ll make things right in the world.


No. That's revenge. If you think that's justice, then our system has failed us.

AverageAmericanGuy: In a panicked situation, those with guns will take steps to ensure their own safety and the safety of those closest to them, sometimes to the detriment and death of others.

I wish they had kept their cool and subdued the rioting crowds using logic and reason, but those people on that bridge weren't about to be subdued so easily.

We are trying them with the benefit of cooler heads and with perfect hindsight, but in those frightful moments with the sound of gunshots coming from within the crowd, we are holding these officers to superhuman standards that they weren't able to live up to. They were panicked humans with guns that day, and people died.


Dude. I'm pretty good about defending the po-po...but you really picked these chucklefarks to defend?

The phrase "pick your battles" comes into play here.
 
2012-04-05 09:24:16 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: LavenderWolf: AverageAmericanGuy: In a panicked situation, those with guns will take steps to ensure their own safety and the safety of those closest to them, sometimes to the detriment and death of others.

I wish they had kept their cool and subdued the rioting crowds using logic and reason, but those people on that bridge weren't about to be subdued so easily.

We are trying them with the benefit of cooler heads and with perfect hindsight, but in those frightful moments with the sound of gunshots coming from within the crowd, we are holding these officers to superhuman standards that they weren't able to live up to. They were panicked humans with guns that day, and people died.

Hell, you're also forgetting the MASSIVE COVERUP. Yes, I'm sure they were totally justified, in the heat of the moment... Except, why, then, would they cover it up and send an innocent man to prison if they're so innocent?

You'll notice that I never mentioned anything about the cover up. That is because the sentence is about the shooting, not the cover up.

The cover up is a red herring here. It was a terrible thing, and the police should definitely be forced to face up to that, but it is separate from the shooting.

Unless I misread the article, which is wholly possible.


I disagree. It's a clear indication of guilt. An innocent man doesn't cover up his crime, and even if so, an innocent man doesn't send another innocent man to prison. Can you use that in a court of law? No. The court of public opinion? Absolutely.
 
2012-04-05 09:27:07 AM

justtray: You'll notice that I never mentioned anything about the cover up. That is because the sentence is about the shooting, not the cover up.

The cover up is a red herring here. It was a terrible thing, and the police should definitely be forced to face up to that, but it is separate from the shooting.

Unless I misread the article, which is wholly possible.

You did, entirely. Not stop posting, moron.


I hate to post a direct quote from the article, but this is the very first line:

A federal judge sentenced five former police officers to years in prison for the deadly shootings

Nothing there about the cover up. It's all about the shooting.

Not you stop posting.
 
2012-04-05 09:50:59 AM
It's about time.

There was nothing "superhuman" about these murdering assholes. Plain and simple, the rule of law was discarded not just by the assholes pulling the triggers, but also by the assholes hiding the truth about what happened.

A prime example of what happens when cops commit crimes - other cops cover for them. It's not an "isolated incident," but an unwritten code followed far too often by cops with a tribal mentality. We've seen it here in Seattle over & over again, to the point where the Justice Department has had to step in & figure out what's actually going on here, too.
 
2012-04-05 09:52:58 AM
FTFA - "All five were convicted of participating in a cover-up."
 
2012-04-05 09:53:04 AM
I didn't expect the headline to be sincere.

Good stuff.
 
2012-04-05 10:01:49 AM

TuteTibiImperes: Personally, I would. In times of disaster sometimes people do stupid things. I'm not saying they should get off scot free, but any sentences like this for people who had been upstanding citizens up until they were faced with an unimaginable situation just proves that our justice system is more about retribution than rehabilitation.


You know we're talking about cops, right? Right? Okay, just checking...
 
2012-04-05 10:02:29 AM
Were any of the people they murdered wearing hoodies at the time? WE HAVE TO REOPEN THE CASE!!11!
 
2012-04-05 10:10:59 AM
The real question is, which prison do they get sent to? They get sent to Angola, they will have more protection than many think. Angola, despite being one of the toughest prisons in America, can protect prisoners through segregation and special details, and cops will protect cops.

They get sent out of state, all bets are off.
 
2012-04-05 10:11:31 AM

justtray: FTFA - "All five were convicted of participating in a cover-up."


Not to be obtuse, but that line was buried at the end of the article and was easy to miss.
 
2012-04-05 10:16:34 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: justtray: FTFA - "All five were convicted of participating in a cover-up."

Not to be obtuse, but that line was buried at the end of the article and was easy to miss.


It's got it's own paragraph. And yeah, wow, if you couldn't figure it out from the context of the article that is entirely abou how lightly they got off because they couldn't charge them with murder, you actually had to read the ENTIRE thing? How insane indeed.

Now fark off.
 
2012-04-05 10:17:38 AM
Oh, and the NOPD has proven to be a cesspool, with the good cops (there are some, without a doubt) being dragged down with the bad ones. And this is after Katrina, with a new mayor and a new chief. Once a week, some clown officer does something stupid, and at least the local media calls him/her on it.

New Orleans still has one of the highest murder rates per capita in the country, if not outright, and is the only city I wouldn't consider going into unless I was armed.
 
2012-04-05 10:21:00 AM

justtray: AverageAmericanGuy: justtray: FTFA - "All five were convicted of participating in a cover-up."

Not to be obtuse, but that line was buried at the end of the article and was easy to miss.

It's got it's own paragraph. And yeah, wow, if you couldn't figure it out from the context of the article that is entirely abou how lightly they got off because they couldn't charge them with murder, you actually had to read the ENTIRE thing? How insane indeed.

Now fark off.


LOL.

2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-04-05 10:30:04 AM
AverageAmericanGuy: That pic gives me the serious gibblies.

gah.
 
2012-04-05 10:31:38 AM

TV's Vinnie: What a second.....

Cops that killed? Actually are going to prison?

Not "Bad cops. Probation for you" or just a brief stint in some minimum security country club?

But, actual, hardened cons, butt-rapes daily in the showers prison?



WHHHOOOOAAAAAAA!


Don't get too excited they didn't get convicted of Murder as they should have been but a federal beef for "violation of civil rights"

that said Fed time is MUCH harder than state time because there is no longer any sort of parole in the fed system, and what level of security you get locked up in is dependent in part on how long your sentence is.
 
2012-04-05 10:52:00 AM

1stgenwhtrash: The call: "B-B-Black people are crossing the bridge! They're going to start knocking on our doors. Are there no liquor stores? Are there no Superdomes? Send them back. Send them back!"


Um, you do realize that not only were some of the officers black, but the police superintendent (top guy) was black, and the mayor was black.

Right?
 
2012-04-05 10:54:41 AM

CrispFlows: To be fair, they're going to prison for cover-up, not murder. apparently, they're immune from those kind of charges.


I think it is more an issue of the Federal Government not being able to prosecute murder charges (except under certain limited circumstances), but being able to prosecute civil rights violations.

It isn't clear to me, from what I've read about the Danziger Bridge incident, why they weren't prosecuted at the state level for murder. If I had to guess, I'd guess it was because there wasn't sufficient evidence, but do any Louisiana FARKers have a take on that?
 
2012-04-05 10:56:16 AM
Many survivalist types are also gun nuts who seem to have a fantasy about the coming apocalypse when they will finally be able to shoot marauding Negros and Mexicans on sight, or not even marauding ones but just those they can get in their cross hairs. After all they have to protect their caches of women, food, and weapons.

Survivalists often require regular of shooting practice using human silhouette targets, and I bet they imagine those targets as slavering Negros.

When I brought this and the LA shootings us in a survivalist thread a while back I got lots of howls about either that there was no evidence of the shootings or that they were justified. Nobody defended "open season on Negros" even though that is what many truly want.
 
2012-04-05 10:59:04 AM

Magorn: TV's Vinnie: What a second.....

Cops that killed? Actually are going to prison?

Not "Bad cops. Probation for you" or just a brief stint in some minimum security country club?

But, actual, hardened cons, butt-rapes daily in the showers prison?



WHHHOOOOAAAAAAA!

Don't get too excited they didn't get convicted of Murder as they should have been but a federal beef for "violation of civil rights"

that said Fed time is MUCH harder than state time because there is no longer any sort of parole in the fed system, and what level of security you get locked up in is dependent in part on how long your sentence is.


I've been to a lot of prisons, federal detention facilities, etc, and I'd tend to agree federal prisons are generally worse.... though not for the reasons you mentioned.

First, you have private security running a fair bit of the security in the prisons. They tend to be underpaid and don't have the benefits of the federal employees so you end up having drug and gang problems even in facilities where your average stay there is 6-12 months... such a mystery.

Second, you're not always around people you know. I know this sounds minor, but I've had to talk to insurance arsonists who are now in prison with gang bangers from D.C., meth movers from the midwest, and various other winners from the cross section of the United States. They tend to group up quick and get nasty even faster. To put it in perspective, if you go to Sing Sing and you're a New Yorker, at least you're in Ossining, New York. You'll see your family, you'll get vistors, everyone in the prison with you is probably from the five boroughs. You go to a federal prison and all that's out the window. You'll go where they have space, you're cut off from any sort of social network and strata you had in life, and anyone who knows anything about human behavior can tell you that's a recipe for disaster.

There's no real third... unless you manage to go to a supermax facility. It's not easy, there's not many of them, but I would probably ponder suicide over going. They are the most soul crushing places you can manage to be. Not dangerous in the sense that most people think prisons are, but something like 23 hours in the same room until you die is usually enough to make people get to the dying bit very quickly.

There's this Americanist concept that we have the greatest government ever, a noble experiment in democracy that is, if not perfect, than the best thing ever. That's nice. No one has EVER said that of our criminal justice system, and NO ONE has even thought it about it our prison system. The systems are just broken, they don't work; they make look savage in comparison with most of the civilized world AND they're not effective. It's a perfect storm of fail.

/Didn't even mention the T.B.
 
2012-04-05 11:17:33 AM

Jensaarai: And by "rioting," you mean, "a prominent family of unarmed civilians who had the misfortune of being black trying to cross a bridge getting brutally murdered by police, and a story being made up involving fantastical snipers, gang threats, and other complete bullshiat to cover it up," then yes, I guess you can call their lies being dissected "perfect hindsight."


Since bringing race into it is so important to you, you do realize that two of the officers involved were black, right? You realize that the person sentenced to the most time was black, right? You also realize that police were responding to 911 calls of guns being fired, right?

The coverup was bullshiat and the cops deserve to pay for it but acting as if cops just set out to kill unarmed people for no reason is bullshiat. Something happened on that bridge that day to spook the cops into thinking that their lives were in danger.
 
2012-04-05 11:25:58 AM

Unauthorized Bratwurst: CrispFlows: To be fair, they're going to prison for cover-up, not murder. apparently, they're immune from those kind of charges.

I think it is more an issue of the Federal Government not being able to prosecute murder charges (except under certain limited circumstances), but being able to prosecute civil rights violations.

It isn't clear to me, from what I've read about the Danziger Bridge incident, why they weren't prosecuted at the state level for murder. If I had to guess, I'd guess it was because there wasn't sufficient evidence, but do any Louisiana FARKers have a take on that?


Some were originally charged with murder, but the first case was screwed up by the DA, and the judge had to throw out the case. That's when the feds became involved. They used the civil rights angle because the feds lacked jurisdiction to hand down murder charges. The judge was pissed because it was like convicting Al Capone on tax evasion. He also spoke, at length, about the plea bargains made by other people involved with the case in order to get evidence for these few.
 
2012-04-05 11:32:24 AM

HairBolus: Many survivalist types are also gun nuts who seem to have a fantasy about the coming apocalypse when they will finally be able to shoot marauding Negros and Mexicans on sight, or not even marauding ones but just those they can get in their cross hairs. After all they have to protect their caches of women, food, and weapons.


I've provided a handy Venn Diagram:

i44.tinypic.com
 
2012-04-05 11:34:35 AM
Actual charges and sentences (from wikipedia)
Guilty verdicts were handed down for Bowen, Gisevius, Faulcon, Villavaso and Kaufman on August 5, 2011.

The defendants were found guilty of the following:

Kenneth Bowen: 6 counts of deprivation of rights under color of law, 2 counts of using a weapon during commission of a crime of violence, 1 count of conspiracy, 2 counts of obstruction of justice, and 1 count of civil rights conspiracy.
Robert Faulcon, Jr.: 6 counts of deprivation of rights under color of law, 3 counts of using a weapon during commission of a crime of violence, 1 count of conspiracy, 2 counts of obstruction of justice, and 1 count of civil rights conspiracy.
Robert Gisevius, Jr.: 5 counts of deprivation of rights under color of law, 2 counts of using a weapon during commission of a crime of violence, 1 count of conspiracy, 1 count of obstruction of justice, and 2 counts of civil rights conspiracy.
Anthony Villavaso II: 5 counts of deprivation of rights under color of law, 2 counts of using a weapon during commission of a crime of violence, 1 count of conspiracy, 1 count of obstruction of justice, and 1 count of civil rights conspiracy.
Arthur Kaufman: 4 counts of falsifying official records in a federal investigation, 3 counts of false statements, 2 counts of civil rights conspiracy for false persecution, and 1 count of conspiracy.[3]

An attorney for the Justice Department described it as " the most significant police misconduct prosecution since the Rodney King beating case".

On April 4, 2012, U.S. District Judge Kurt Engelhardt sentenced Faulcon to 65 years' imprisonment, Bowen and Gisevius to 40 years, Villavaso to 38 years, and Kaufman to 6 years. Engelhardt was critical of how the prosecution had been pursued, stating that he was "astonished and deeply troubled" by the number of plea bargains offered to other participants who served as witnesses. Federal prosecutors responded that the plea bargains had been necessary for a difficult case that had been "cold" when they assumed responsibility.

Gerard Dugue, who is alleged to have conspired in the cover-up with Kaufman, is scheduled to be tried in May 2012
 
2012-04-05 11:36:12 AM

Gulper Eel: If you do a search for "Antoinette Frank" you'll find even more charming New Orleans police tales.


You could also search for "Len Davis."
 
2012-04-05 11:52:16 AM
And yet the guy who shot an unarmed civilian in Florida remains free. And will probably never be charged. I guess these cops didn't have the benefit of a "stand your ground" law.
 
2012-04-05 12:04:59 PM

Smelly Pirate Hooker: And yet the guy who shot an unarmed civilian in Florida remains free.


Self defense, how the fark does it work?
 
2012-04-05 01:08:56 PM

AverageAmericanGuy: In a disaster, whatever societal rules we've built for ourselves go out the window pretty fast. It's proof that we're still animals with strong self-preservation instincts, no matter how much we may try to deny it.


I was there, those rules don't go out the window. The ruined black people I picked up at Poland and St. Claude loaded the old white lady in the wheel chair onto my truck first. The level of civility I saw from those suffering was deeply inspiring. The cops I saw, with one exception, acted like dicks. There is absolutely no excuse.
 
2012-04-05 01:20:21 PM

AverageAmericanGuy: In a disaster, whatever societal rules we've built for ourselves go out the window pretty fast. It's proof that we're still animals with strong self-preservation instincts, no matter how much we may try to deny it.

It's not that I think that bad actions shouldn't be punished or condemned. I just think that disaster scenarios can be used as a reason to commute punishment.


You seem to be one of those racist, survivalist, gun nuts I noted above, who can't wait for a disaster or apocalypse because there will be no limit on bagging Negros or Mexicans.
 
2012-04-05 01:24:25 PM

HairBolus: AverageAmericanGuy: In a disaster, whatever societal rules we've built for ourselves go out the window pretty fast. It's proof that we're still animals with strong self-preservation instincts, no matter how much we may try to deny it.

It's not that I think that bad actions shouldn't be punished or condemned. I just think that disaster scenarios can be used as a reason to commute punishment.

You seem to be one of those racist, survivalist, gun nuts I noted above, who can't wait for a disaster or apocalypse because there will be no limit on bagging Negros or Mexicans.


Right. That's what I must be.
 
2012-04-05 01:25:33 PM

ThrobblefootSpectre: 1stgenwhtrash: The call: "B-B-Black people are crossing the bridge! They're going to start knocking on our doors. Are there no liquor stores? Are there no Superdomes? Send them back. Send them back!"

Um, you do realize that not only were some of the officers black, but the police superintendent (top guy) was black, and the mayor was black.

Right?


Sure. How about the community across the bridge? Nevermind. I'll have a look myself.
 
2012-04-05 02:42:01 PM
What the families of the people killed by these cops think: WHAR JUSTICE WHARRRR

What the cops think: But they were shootin' and lootin'! There was a gun in the guy's back pocket!

What the world thinks:


market-ticker.org
 
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