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(Onion AV Club)   Fat, drunk and stupid is no way to write a tell-all book about the making of "Animal House," son   (avclub.com) divider line 17
    More: Fail, Animal House, Matty Simmons, John Landis, Randy Quaid, Karen Allen  
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4632 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 03 Apr 2012 at 12:15 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-04-03 11:42:36 AM
Actually, I think fat, drunk and stupid is the only authentic way to write that book, subby...

/drtfa
 
2012-04-03 01:00:57 PM
Heh! I'm currently reading reading Chris Miller's book, "The Real Animal House: A Mostly Lucid Memoir".

For those not in the know, Chris Miller was the real life "Pinto".
 
2012-04-03 01:14:07 PM
Aren't there already several documentaries on the subject? I can't imagine there are many untold stories.

That said, a feature film on it could actually be interesting.
 
2012-04-03 02:02:51 PM

SharkTrager: I can't imagine there are many untold stories.


When there are complaints like:
""There were also many problems with [Randy] Quaid's wife on the set, but that story's been told and retold.""

Yep. And this book doesn't even try to tell the stories already told.
 
2012-04-03 02:08:15 PM

Bathia_Mapes: Heh! I'm currently reading reading Chris Miller's book, "The Real Animal House: A Mostly Lucid Memoir".

For those not in the know, Chris Miller was the real life "Pinto".


That's not a bad book, and Chris will go down in history as the author of "The Night of the Seven Fires" for NatLamp in '74 which proved there was a market for college nostalgia. The rest, as they say, is history.

Miller's editor at NatLamp was Tony Hendra, whose book "Going Too Far" gives a good account of how that short story became a screenplay and then a movie. Hendra gave a great eulogy for Doug Kenney: "Did he jump? Did he fall? Or did he fall while looking for a place to jump?"

And Miller and Hendra both seem to think that Simmons was a hack who lucked into "producing" a very talented team and then managed to squander most of it through poor management.
 
2012-04-03 03:43:51 PM

OldManDownDRoad: Bathia_Mapes: Heh! I'm currently reading reading Chris Miller's book, "The Real Animal House: A Mostly Lucid Memoir".

For those not in the know, Chris Miller was the real life "Pinto".

That's not a bad book, and Chris will go down in history as the author of "The Night of the Seven Fires" for NatLamp in '74 which proved there was a market for college nostalgia. The rest, as they say, is history.

Miller's editor at NatLamp was Tony Hendra, whose book "Going Too Far" gives a good account of how that short story became a screenplay and then a movie. Hendra gave a great eulogy for Doug Kenney: "Did he jump? Did he fall? Or did he fall while looking for a place to jump?"

And Miller and Hendra both seem to think that Simmons was a hack who lucked into "producing" a very talented team and then managed to squander most of it through poor management.


There was an outstanding essay written by Chris Miller, "Son of Animal House", which was a defense of the fraternity system before it [frats] became emasculated in the 1990s. If either of you have seen soft copy, could you please post a link?
 
2012-04-03 04:04:08 PM

Stinkyy:

There was an outstanding essay written by Chris Miller, "Son of Animal House", which was a defense of the fraternity system before it [frats] became emasculated in the 1990s. If either of you have seen soft copy, could you please post a link?


Yeah, that was in the Dartmouth Alumni Magazine in '89 or so, and was widely reprinted in places like the Wall Street Journal. Unfortunately, the WSJ has a paywall for their archives, and the Dartmouth magazine only discovered the intertubes in 2008, so their online archives are useless.

If you've got a research/university library nearby, maybe they can get a copy for you.
 
2012-04-03 04:13:53 PM
Actually he already covered most of this ground in his previous, lackluster, history of National Lampoon...

ecx.images-amazon.com

Odd to see that he seems to have mended his fences with Tim Matheson, though.
 
2012-04-03 05:52:16 PM

OldManDownDRoad: Stinkyy:

There was an outstanding essay written by Chris Miller, "Son of Animal House", which was a defense of the fraternity system before it [frats] became emasculated in the 1990s. If either of you have seen soft copy, could you please post a link?

Yeah, that was in the Dartmouth Alumni Magazine in '89 or so, and was widely reprinted in places like the Wall Street Journal. Unfortunately, the WSJ has a paywall for their archives, and the Dartmouth magazine only discovered the intertubes in 2008, so their online archives are useless.

If you've got a research/university library nearby, maybe they can get a copy for you.


There was also a more explicit version of "Son of Animal House" in Playboy magazine. It was titled "Return to Animal House".
 
2012-04-03 07:33:28 PM
Does anyone else out there not really care for that movie? I'll watch it when its on but I get bored with it and never finish it. I don't think I've ever watched it from beginning to end in one sitting.
 
2012-04-03 07:46:31 PM

The Troof hurts: Does anyone else out there not really care for that movie? I'll watch it when its on but I get bored with it and never finish it. I don't think I've ever watched it from beginning to end in one sitting.


Nope, and that's not just because it was filmed in the area where I live.
 
2012-04-03 08:16:14 PM
I was in college from '78 to '81 and, though inconsistent, National Lampoon was still capable of being funny. In P.J. O'Rourke's book Age & Guile beats Youth, Innocence & a Bad Haircut there is an essay called So Drunk that even NL wouldn't print. It's very good. And even though he's clearly lost his chops, he could write very well once, like Why I'm Not Afraid Of The Dark
 
2012-04-03 11:28:01 PM

The Troof hurts: Does anyone else out there not really care for that movie? I'll watch it when its on but I get bored with it and never finish it. I don't think I've ever watched it from beginning to end in one sitting.


It insists upon itself, Lois.
 
2012-04-04 05:24:59 AM
Do you mind if we dance wif yo' dates?
 
2012-04-04 07:51:15 AM

Crewmannumber6: I was in college from '78 to '81 and, though inconsistent, National Lampoon was still capable of being funny. In P.J. O'Rourke's book Age & Guile beats Youth, Innocence & a Bad Haircut there is an essay called So Drunk that even NL wouldn't print. It's very good. And even though he's clearly lost his chops, he could write very well once, like Why I'm Not Afraid Of The Dark


In his prime, there was no one funnier than PJ. His short articles for Car and Driver must have made their censors have strokes, given his penchant for writing about cars as only necessary tools to further his pursuit of drinking and sex. One of his best lines came in an article about driving in bad weather: "You're trying to negotiate a bad turn on an icy road with a drink in one hand, and the young lovely in the seat next to you says: 'Hey, I shaved my crotch today, wanna feel?'"

"Age & Guile" also has PJ's hilarious account of working for an underground paper that had their own police informant on staff. The informant was soon brought around to their cause when he realized that hippies got high and laid a lot.

PJ also held NatLamp together after the first wave of defections, when Doug Kenney and Mike O'Donoghue left after their falling out. It was PJ who kept Rick Meyerowitz on staff as art director (he created the famous "we'll shoot this dog" cover) and also managed to retain Sean Kelly and Michael Gross while hiring Chris Cerf and Ed Subitsky.

PJ also talked Doug Kenney into one last project: the National Lampoon High School Yearbook Parody - quite possibly the most brilliant parody in all of American literature. A number of the "Animal House" characters first appear here, Larry Kroger being the most important. The original idea for Animal House had it taking place at Kefauver High, location of the yearbook, but Chris Miller convinced them to move it to college and Larry became the freshman, Pinto.

Yeah, PJ got old but he can still make me laugh on occasion. He came through town a couple years ago on a book tour and I managed to get him to sign my yearbook copy, Age & Guile, and a copy of "Republican Party Reptile." He has a slight speech impediment so he's not very comfortable in crowds, but he did write on the flyleaf of "Age and Guile" that "we shot the dog."
 
2012-04-04 09:55:51 AM

OldManDownDRoad: Yeah, PJ got old but he can still make me laugh on occasion. He came through town a couple years ago on a book tour and I managed to get him to sign my yearbook copy, Age & Guile, and a copy of "Republican Party Reptile." He has a slight speech impediment so he's not very comfortable in crowds, but he did write on the flyleaf of "Age and Guile" that "we shot the dog."


He's pretty good when he's on Wait, Wait....Don't Tell Me
 
2012-04-06 04:54:43 PM
Does this thing talk?
 
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