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(Telegraph)   Ministers in the UK to introduce a major expansion of the Government's powers to monitor everything of every person that uses the Internet in "real time". It's for your own good 'citizens'   (telegraph.co.uk) divider line 89
    More: Asinine, technology change, dot com companies, GCHQ  
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3246 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 Apr 2012 at 2:29 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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rka
2012-04-02 03:02:32 PM

Goodfella: George Orwell's "1984" was supposed to be a warning, not an instruction manual.


It's no coincidence that 1984 and V for Vendetta were written by British authors, for British readers and take place in Britain.

Not everything is a veiled reference to the US.
 
2012-04-02 03:03:29 PM

TomD9938: Dont like it?

There's always Somalia.

[www.worldsupertravel.info image 460x419]

/do not leave valuables in car...


I think that could be the next new tourist slogan for the west. "Sure, you can't wipe your ass without us knowing, but at least we're not Somalia!"©

Yet.

This may have eluded you since you don't get a lot of news hiding under your bed from ter'ists, but..

WE'RE NOT SUPPOSED TO BE SOMALIA.
 
2012-04-02 03:03:54 PM

genner: Mock26: Nightsweat: DavidVincent: The UK is 5 years ahead of the US.

No, they're just more open about it. NSA has most of the world's supercomputers. They aren't playing Doom on those bad boys.

Of course not. They are playing World of Warcraft and the latest Star Wars online game.

No there still playing Ultima Online, which is the only reason that game still exists
.


huh, and all this time I thought they were mining bitcoins.
 
2012-04-02 03:03:54 PM

Wellon Dowd: TomD9938: Dont like it?

There's always Somalia.

[www.worldsupertravel.info image 460x419]

/do not leave valuables in car...

That's gorgeous. I can see why the pirates based themselves there.


felt the same way. maybe we can take care of piracy by gentrifying the beaches and establishing a bona fide tourist industry.

/ just send me one million dollars, risk free investment opportunities!
 
2012-04-02 03:04:23 PM
 
2012-04-02 03:06:29 PM
1. Submit Apr 1 article on Apr 2
2. Profit
 
2012-04-02 03:07:09 PM

bunner: TomD9938: Dont like it?

There's always Somalia.

[www.worldsupertravel.info image 460x419]

/do not leave valuables in car...

I think that could be the next new tourist slogan for the west. "Sure, you can't wipe your ass without us knowing, but at least we're not Somalia!"©

Yet.

This may have eluded you since you don't get a lot of news hiding under your bed from ter'ists, but..

WE'RE NOT SUPPOSED TO BE SOMALIA.


Exactly.
 
2012-04-02 03:07:10 PM
*cough* Echelon *hack*

/they've all been doing this for years
//this just makes the mass surveillance more efficient
 
2012-04-02 03:07:59 PM
Wait- is this the same country where police can't respond to burglaries because they "don't have the manpower"?


BTW: they are planning the same thing here. They just need time to finish building it:
Link (new window)
www.wired.com
 
2012-04-02 03:08:18 PM
But this whole "slippery slope" thing is a fallacy, right? Politicians don't know no scope creep. It can't happen here. I've got my finger in my ear.
 
2012-04-02 03:11:08 PM
The dept of homeland security is temporary.
 
2012-04-02 03:16:51 PM

DavidVincent: The dept of homeland security is temporary.


Like the income tax?
 
2012-04-02 03:20:59 PM

r1niceboy: Cythraul: I'm starting to think the UK deserves the Nanny State label.

GCHQ isn't a nanny, it's more like a vindictive nun with boundary issues.


upload.wikimedia.org

/Knows a little something about that
 
2012-04-02 03:24:20 PM

Walker: Fake:
[img.photobucket.com image 383x495

Real:
[img.photobucket.com image 209x303

Also real:
[img.photobucket.com image 300x400

/scary

That's creepy
 
2012-04-02 03:36:11 PM
How are you English Farkers enjoying your police state?
 
2012-04-02 03:36:48 PM

bunner: DavidVincent: The dept of homeland security is temporary.

Like the income tax?


And an honest politician?
 
2012-04-02 03:37:33 PM

DavidVincent: This is why I don't trust people who say the US constitution is a "living, breathing document" or it is "out of date".


Wait, are we talking about the US constitution or Gingrich?
 
2012-04-02 03:45:51 PM

Goodfella: [spacekimono.files.wordpress.com image 320x469]

George Orwell's "1984" was supposed to be a warning, not an instruction manual.


Modern version:

i26.photobucket.com
 
2012-04-02 03:53:11 PM
paragini.com
 
2012-04-02 04:06:28 PM
The foundations for this legislation have been present for some time within the UK, as have the legal loopholes necessary for some even more invasive interception methods without warrant or judicial oversight. There is nothing new here, people hand over freedoms if they are told it is good for them without blinking. People are so willing to sacrafice a few rights to think they are saving the freedoms they care about. I loathe those with an attitude of 'I have nothing to hide so why should I care'.

Given the amount of data some key companies hold on individuals, and the prevailance of software to connect individuals to other, to places and events. Imagine if Google became a UK ISP for instance, I believe they are going that way in the US?
The amount of data that could be harvested from Google relating to searches for words, locations, events. Emails, and calendars, social networks (Don't laugh), cloud based contact lists.

They say there are on average 6 degrees of seperation for us all? That means in theory you are 6 steps away in a database from the most wanted criminals and others these agencies classify as undesirables. You might not even know you go to the same bar as them, or that when your friend uses your phone to call someone and misdials the number, that you aren't intrinsicly being linked to another person on this database

/The people elect the politicians who pass these laws
//Shame the people who write these laws never change with the government, there is no election of the civil service
///The politicians should fear the people, not the people fearing the politicians.
 
2012-04-02 04:09:01 PM
Nick Pickles?!?

FTFA: Nick Pickles, director of the Big Brother Watch campaign group, said: "This is an unprecedented step that will see Britain adopt the same kind of surveillance seen in China and Iran."

So they want to stop the theft of gherkins??
 
2012-04-02 04:11:32 PM

apoptotic: gaslight: Some observations:

1) The UK is so broke they're slashing services left and right.
2) This will cost a lot of money.
3) Someone will have to pay for it.
4) It may be illegal.

I could be wrong, but from what I can tell, the cost is to be borne by the ISPs (ie their customers). A previous plan that included a national database failed, but this one appears to require that ISPs and telecoms record everything and only turn it over to law enforcement on request rather than the government storing the data.


It actually puts the UK more or less in line with current US legislation. So pretty scary if you are into that sort of thing, but hardly unprecedented.
 
2012-04-02 04:13:43 PM

Wellon Dowd: TomD9938: Dont like it?

There's always Somalia.

www.worldsupertravel.info

/do not leave valuables in car...

That's gorgeous. I can see why the pirates based themselves there.


That, and they apparently have hover boats.
 
2012-04-02 04:24:16 PM
My first visit to LEngland was in 1993 and I was creeped out then by all the surveillance cameras...on freeways, on every lamp post in London..everywhere. That was, of course, before the US followed their charming example.
 
2012-04-02 04:33:28 PM
Know what really keeps people from strenuously protesting this garbage?

Having to choose between sticking with the struggle and keeping their job.

Between politicians and plutocrats, it's easy to break people who have something to lose.
 
2012-04-02 04:35:34 PM
Citizen 1034857567 Face the telescreen. .
 
2012-04-02 04:40:02 PM

Challam: My first visit to LEngland was in 1993 and I was creeped out then by all the surveillance cameras...on freeways, on every lamp post in London..everywhere. That was, of course, before the US followed their charming example.


The good news is that there's so many of them no-one's ever watching.
 
2012-04-02 04:56:39 PM

apoptotic: gaslight: Some observations:

1) The UK is so broke they're slashing services left and right.
2) This will cost a lot of money.
3) Someone will have to pay for it.
4) It may be illegal.

I could be wrong, but from what I can tell, the cost is to be borne by the ISPs (ie their customers). A previous plan that included a national database failed, but this one appears to require that ISPs and telecoms record everything and only turn it over to law enforcement on request rather than the government storing the data.


So it'll be a tax passed on to one portion of the population -- those buying internet services -- and administered through the private sector, Good. Okay, so essentially it'll be a hidden tax on the economy for economy for some vague purpose that will now resist cost/risk: benefit analysis and be open to both private sector and government use and abuse with what oversight?

Sounds wonderful.

Don't get me wrong. I expect the government to go out and catch bad guys, but is this clanking, expensive difficult-to-quantify system the best that can be created? Amazingly, the government says they want to see everything, but they won't look at content. Look, English is the national language there. So, speak it. You'll see what everyone's doing....but you won't.

qualityshows.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-04-02 05:29:54 PM

KarmicDisaster: Citizen 1034857567 Face the telescreen. .


Look into the bright light and wait for the flash
 
2012-04-02 05:29:55 PM
I hope our brothers from another mother "sack up", and squash this invasion by their government on their rights to privacy.

I really just don't understand how our elected officials feel they can just trample our rights... wait, what?
 
2012-04-02 05:31:31 PM

CasperImproved: I hope our brothers from another mother "sack up", and squash this invasion by their government on their rights to privacy.

I really just don't understand how our elected officials feel they can just trample our rights... wait, what?


What Big Brother giveth, Big Brother taketh away
 
2012-04-02 05:32:26 PM
If Anon wanted to be Robin Hood...now's their chance.
 
2012-04-02 05:47:07 PM

hp6sa: I thought they were called "subjects" in the UK, not citizens.


Wrong. refutation tomorrow when i get up if i can be bothered. but seriously, Google it.
 
2012-04-02 05:47:54 PM

category_five: The UK doesn't have citizens, it has subjects.


Wrong.
 
2012-04-02 06:11:08 PM

Pert: category_five: The UK doesn't have citizens, it has subjects.

Wrong.


Has the UK's government openly started calling them victims, rather than the previous euphemisms of 'citizen' or 'subject'?
 
2012-04-02 06:43:53 PM
 
2012-04-02 06:55:44 PM
Don't worry, England, sharia will save you.
 
2012-04-03 06:25:09 AM

hp6sa: I thought they were called "subjects" in the UK, not citizens.


category_five: The UK doesn't have citizens, it has subjects.


British citizenship is one of the six different forms of British nationality. Some of these were defined in the British Nationality Act 1981, which came into force on 1 January 1983. The laws defining how citizenship can be obtained changed on that date, which is why you will often see references to 1983 on this site.

The forms of nationality are:

British citizenship;
British overseas citizenship;
British overseas territories citizenship;
British national (overseas);
British protected person; and
British subject.

The rules about British subject status changed in 1949 and again in 1983, so those dates are important when deciding if someone is a British subject.

Until 1949, nearly everyone with a close connection to the United Kingdom was called a British subject. And all citizens of Commonwealth countries were British subjects until January 1983. Since that date, very few categories of people have qualified as British subjects.

Link (new window)

Trolljegeren: Has the UK's government openly started calling them victims, rather than the previous euphemisms of 'citizen' or 'subject'?


You are a tool.


sharkbeagle: Don't worry, England, sharia will save you.


You are also a tool.
 
2012-04-03 09:22:14 AM

PlatinumDragon: Know what really keeps people from strenuously protesting this garbage?

Having to choose between sticking with the struggle and keeping their job.

Between politicians and plutocrats, it's easy to break people who have something to lose.


This.
 
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