If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Mother Nature Network)   55% of employees surveyed say they are more productive when they work at home. 75% of bosses say "bullshiat"   (mnn.com) divider line 131
    More: Obvious, employee surveys, finished work  
•       •       •

3739 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Apr 2012 at 11:02 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



131 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-04-01 12:01:46 PM

Slives: So which would most bosses rather, walk over to a group of cubes and look over folks shoulders to see what they are working on, or throw a chat out saying 'who is responding to that page'?


Chat/email. No contest. My team is 12 people spread out over different buildings, cities, and countries. That's a hell of a lot of walking. If I can reach people by phone/chat/IM and they're actively contributing to the project, I don't give a shiat which chair their ass is in.

Working from home has lots of benefits, but those little periods where somebody steps away from their system even if just long enough to tell the Girl Scouts they have already bought enough boxes of cookies this year, leaves the rest of the team in a form of limbo.

It must drive you bananas when they're in the office, but they have to pee. That also leaves the team in a form of limbo.
 
2012-04-01 12:02:08 PM
If you need a group work session (say troubleshooting a major issue), in the office is generally easier

Everything else is more productive working from home.

/Except when there are screaming kids and barking dogs in the background throughout a meeting
//Working from home != free daycare
 
2012-04-01 12:03:01 PM

gimmegimme: [images.wikia.com image 550x415]

Look, it has gotten to the point where I find pants restrictive. I could opt for the cape, but I don't want to look like a weirdo. So I went with the muu muu.


Too bad your ass can't fit into a movie theater seat

/But you do get a trashbag full of free popcorn
 
2012-04-01 12:04:09 PM
Let's see...

Back when I was tech support, circa 1999, we had managers constantly watching us, as if that would improve call time when most of our problems required walking customers through multiple reboots.

If the bandwidth had been available we should have all been sent to work from home. That would have allowed them to more heavily leverage the management and eliminated the cost of office space. Then those jobs might have stayed home instead of going to India, where the costs are creeping upward and people aren't being fooled by Raj calling himself Bob.

I made $15hr in 2000, so adjusted... Wait, wages didn't go up in the past decade, so it would still be a $15hr job. Ughh, I can see why the rest of you are in trouble.

Now that I actually do work from home for myself I actually can reduce things down to being efficient, and if I don't want to work this week I could take it off and I'd still have income from past work paying off. But I gotta admit work is work, and it can be boring or frustrating even when it's just me.
 
2012-04-01 12:04:29 PM

casual disregard: This meeting shiat has gotten out of hand. Send a farking e-mail, your people are adults who can do their jobs. And if they aren't able to do their jobs without eternal meetings, fire them and hire somebody who will.


Sweet merciful crap, this is the truth. My husband's department has several mandatory meetings that last 2-3 hours every week, and no one ever gets anything accomplished.

My department (at a different company) has one required Skype meeting for exactly one hour every week just to go over key points and new developments. Because it's just an hour a week, I actually look forward to it. I've been working from home for over three years, and I wouldn't want to give it up. I get tons of work done, and I can take a swim break or work in my PJs if I feel like it.
 
2012-04-01 12:05:59 PM

Creoena: /Except when there are screaming kids and barking dogs in the background throughout a meeting


This. I heard a screaming baby on a speakerphone in the conference room down the hall a while back, and just about flipped my shiat. I have young children - I gotta hear noisy kids at work too? I go into the office partly so I don't have to deal with my kids during the day.

If yo're stuck watching small children while trying to work from home (it happens, I understand), just beg off of conference calls. Seriously.
 
2012-04-01 12:06:53 PM

Cyclonic Cooking Action: DNRTFA

But IBM did a study a while back and found people had higher productivity at home, so my wife works from home as does everyone she works with at the company. I don't think the whole of IBM does but...



Is that the same IBM that is now allowing WFH where absolutely necessary, but calling people back to the office otherwise?
(I don't know about IBM US, but they are recalling homeworkers in other places)
 
2012-04-01 12:07:13 PM
For me there are trade-offs. I can't say one environment is more productive than the other. At home there are fewer interruptions and no drive time. In the office, I can communicate face-to-face with people, and sometimes that spins off conversations about related matters that don't seem to happen via messaging, email or phone calls.

In the office, I can put ideas down on a white board, look at someone's quizzical face, and we can discuss concerns right there and then.

Also, in the office, there is the overhearing effect that just can't happen when everybody is working separately at home.
 
2012-04-01 12:08:28 PM

badhatharry: stiletto_the_wise: Remember, kiddies, if your job can be done from home, it can be done from India. Watch what you wish for.

If you job is working in an office it can be done from India.


I can assure you mine can't. Then again I'm senior management.

Of course, give what my company just went though with a software vendor who uses Indian labor, even if all our jobs could be done in India it would never happen.
 
2012-04-01 12:09:52 PM

djh0101010: Endive Wombat: Working from home can make sense based off your job roll - IT support, you should probably be in the office. Inside sales - you can get away with working from home

How so? My ~3000 servers are in datacenters I'm rarely in, and my team is spread across 5 countries. Since at any given time I'm not physically where most of the stuff I work on is, what makes driving in to the office better than being some other place where the servers aren't?

As long as people are accessible by phone and chat, and are working, I don't see any difference where they're sitting. And I am a lot more productive when I work from home, there are far fewer interruptions and the coffee is better.


I've been WFH for a little over a year, as has every other IT employee who doesn't do front-line support. Our company is spread out across four distinct campuses that are each about 40 miles away from each other. It got to the point where on any given day 300 employees could be at any given campus for any reason, so we decided fark it - station people at home. We converted part of the existing offices/cube farms on each campus to shared workspaces (hotel cubes, video conference rooms, work rooms, etc) and gave the rest of the office space back to the company.

It's been great. Employees are still required to come in if they have to, for meetings or to physically receive a server, or for whatever reason they need to be physically present. Otherwise, they are expected to be online, available, and accountable during business hours. You can leave during the day to run an errand, or pick up your kids, or whatever, but you have to let everyone know, all 300 people WFH, what you are doing. It's been so successful we actually fired someone who wouldn't follow the rules (I'm convinced the asshole was sleeping all day) and everyone was actually pleased because that one guy was making the whole WFH process look bad.

We did such a good job of it within the IT department that the company is now looking to offload 20-30% of their employees by next year to WFH to save money on real estate. In five years, they want to get that number up to 40-50%. We are pioneering the plans, procedures and infrastructure for how the company will work in the future.

Now that internet access is common across the country - this is how companies will work in the future. I still hit the office once or twice a week, but not for a whole day and usually just for meetings. Our productivity isn't soaring, but we've managed to handle the conversion without making it worse. I figure once we weed out the people who simply can't work from home - the ADD kids, the lazy assholes, Frank - then we'll start to see an improvement in productivity. Some people just can't do work on their own. We're going to have to move those people back, but probably into a different job.
 
2012-04-01 12:11:31 PM

Slives: I think a lot of the reason bosses don't agree is that it is harder to find people when you need something. It is a lot easier to walk down a row of cubes to see who is available, then you throw a request out on a chat program and hope folks get back to you.
In my case, IT support, when an issue pops up, we need to get somebody to respond to it quickly. So which would most bosses rather, walk over to a group of cubes and look over folks shoulders to see what they are working on, or throw a chat out saying 'who is responding to that page'?

Working from home has lots of benefits, but those little periods where somebody steps away from their system even if just long enough to tell the Girl Scouts they have already bought enough boxes of cookies this year, leaves the rest of the team in a form of limbo. As a team supervisor, I can say that is the part that bothers me the most about having the team working from home.


This is the precisely why when I work from home I'm glued to my computer and my cell phone is at my hip. I never want someone that's trying to reach me to think "where is he, at the beach?". I start my day when I normally start my commute, at 07:00. I respond almost instantly to communicator messages and always pick up the phone, or respond to voicemails within 10 minutes. I have lunch at my desk, and my headset's on my head even when I'm taking a wee.

Now when I'm forced to go into work all bets are off. I'm wandering around the floor, chatting up the cute girl on the 6th floor, going for coffee, taking long lunches away..maybe I'll forget my cell phone at my desk..etc. It takes me over 90 minutes to get to work. If the company is going to make me blow 3 hours that day on commuting I'm not giving them the 110% I do when I'm working from home.
 
2012-04-01 12:12:00 PM
I've been working from home for the past 2 years. Just ditching the commute alone did wonders for my sanity and my wallet. I have more than enough to keep busy and anyone can reach out to me in a moments notice either by phone, email or IM. I live in the suburbs, so the neighborhood is dead quiet during the day and there are no distractions. If anything, I feel more pressure to make sure I produce just so that I can maintain a trusting relationship with my boss. If I don't give her a reason to have to keep tabs on me and make sure I'm at my desk working, she'll leave me alone and let me do my thing. She actually treats her employees like adults until someone gives her a reason not to, and she'll come down on you like the hammer of Thor if she catches you abusing the privilege. Keeps me out of the office politics and the gossip circles. It's an ideal set-up if your self-disciplined and motivated.
 
2012-04-01 12:17:05 PM

justoneznot: I worked in a call center doing B2B sales. I then got a job at another company doing the same thing in the same industry, only I got to work from home. It was nice getting to work from home but I always felt a bit out of the loop, and I realized that working from home meant working alone. I missed the energy of the call center, being surrounded by a bunch of people doing the same thing. It was much harder to get motivated just sitting in my quiet living room by myself.


baaaaaaa
 
kab
2012-04-01 12:17:53 PM
My boss and team mates aren't even remotely close to my office to begin with, so I'm getting a kick...
 
2012-04-01 12:18:04 PM
My company has a pretty schitzo work-from-home policy. The CEO is totally gung-ho, but the line supervisors and their managers allow it only because they have no choice not to. Some of them require an elaborate approval process with some really obnoxious paperwork.

Other than this one thing, the culture is pretty employee friendly. We have: flex time, compressed work schedules, work/family balance, onsite childcare at below market rates, 24/7 free onsite fitness center, free vanpools, etc....
 
2012-04-01 12:18:21 PM

Creoena: /Except when there are screaming kids and barking dogs in the background throughout a meeting


One of my team members got written up because his goddamn dog would bark on every conference call he was on. He had to go to remedial telework training (yes, we have such a thing) TWICE. And he biatched about it both times before he finally started locking the dog out of the room when he was on the phone.

I don't think he understood how close he was to getting fired - if your boss repeatedly tells you that you are unprofessional on the phone - the problem is you, not your boss. If your boss actually says "I'm sending you to the same training you just had last month because once again you sat in on a conference call with a barking dog, even after we asked you ON THE CALL to shut the dog up" - well, you should get the hint.

Now if we have a conference call and someone is making background noise, we stop the meeting until we identify and stop the noise. It's nice to have a procedure down for it, because most people these days are self-centered assholes who don't understand that other people can hear everything they are doing while they are on the phone. I was on a call with 8 people and one woman answered her home phone while she was on the conference call.
 
2012-04-01 12:18:34 PM
Worked from home once, doing medical transcription, but with two kids aged 4 and 2 in the house it was hard to be very productive. I wouldn't mind it, but I like being around other people and I get distracted too easily.
 
2012-04-01 12:22:19 PM

Gothnet: Cyclonic Cooking Action: DNRTFA

But IBM did a study a while back and found people had higher productivity at home, so my wife works from home as does everyone she works with at the company. I don't think the whole of IBM does but...


Is that the same IBM that is now allowing WFH where absolutely necessary, but calling people back to the office otherwise?
(I don't know about IBM US, but they are recalling homeworkers in other places)


Might be but I haven't heard of it yet. She used to work with people in the UK who did WFH as well as quite a few other countries, and is now exclusively North America. We are in Orange County, CA and I believe they shut one of their local offices down almost completely. But let me put it this way, I wouldn't doubt anything IBM did. =D
 
2012-04-01 12:24:58 PM

Lsherm: most people these days are self-centered assholes who don't understand that other people can hear everything they are doing while they are on the phone.


Including typing. That's the most common offense, IMO. Clicka-clicka-tacka-clickety-clackety-tacka-tacka...

Mute your phone unless you actually have to speak. It solves 99% of these problems.
 
2012-04-01 12:25:35 PM
The other big issue for me is that my job isn't just problem-solving; it also involves a fair amount of programming, etc. When I work from home, I spread those tasks out. I'm getting bored or mentally drifting? Fine -- I'll go for a walk, watch TV, read a book, or whatever for half an hour or an hour, then finish the task later.

I'm tethered to a desk at work I have one option -- the Internet. So yes, I have lots more time on Fark and Reddit, but I count those as work hours since I can't leave. Yes, my productivity *does* go down.

When I first started at this job 15 years ago our division leader knew that I was up at 1am working on things, even if I was only in the office from 10-4. He'd call me and I'd get what he needed done, and he praised me in front of the whole organization for it. Then we got a new boss who required that we stay in the office 8-5 every day, even to the point of submitting time sheets. Needless to say, I stopped answering emails after work; I kind of checked out mentally. My bosses tell me how great it is that everyone is in from 8-5, but they don't realize that we're doing a lot less work than we used to and the urgent stuff sits and waits until work hours.
 
2012-04-01 12:29:39 PM

casual disregard:

This meeting shiat has gotten out of hand. Send a farking e-mail, your people are adults who can do their jobs. And if they aren't able to do their jobs without eternal meetings, fire them and hire somebody who will.


I wish that were true but lots of things can only be done in person.

And there are still people who don't use email at all.
 
2012-04-01 12:31:43 PM

Fuggin Bizzy: Lsherm: most people these days are self-centered assholes who don't understand that other people can hear everything they are doing while they are on the phone.

Including typing. That's the most common offense, IMO. Clicka-clicka-tacka-clickety-clackety-tacka-tacka...

Mute your phone unless you actually have to speak. It solves 99% of these problems.


On big meetings a moderator is helpful and can actually see who is making the noise and call them out on it, or a presenter can unmute or select people to speak. But yeah, mute should be everyone's friend unless otherwise actually engaged.
 
2012-04-01 12:34:15 PM

T.M.S.: And there are still people who don't use email at all.


I can't imagine hiring somebody that doesn't use email. "Oh, you only use a corded rotary-dial phone and an IBM Selectric typewriter? That's okay, we'll all just work around your luddite ass."
 
2012-04-01 12:34:30 PM

sammyk: I haven't been to the office in 6 months and no one is expecting me there anytime soon. FSM bless my wonderful boss. Bonus: My high blood pressure seems to be cured.


Got ya beat... I haven't been in the office in almost 2 yrs. Living in PA, office is in Vegas.

My boss knows I'm pretty much available 24/7... something I wasn't even when I lived in Vegas. I'm up at 6am and due to the 3hr time difference I'm sometimes still working as emails & calls come in at 7-8pm my time.

Works out good... because they know if I take a Monday away or I'm out... I'll be working Saturday and/or Sunday to get my things done.

 
2012-04-01 12:34:52 PM
But how can we have the hourly standup scrum if you are working from home?? And don't get me started on the bi-hourly sit down scrum!
 
2012-04-01 12:35:44 PM
As a vendor contractor who works at home and was just praised for the sheer amount of work our team did on our latest software release, I'm getting a kick...

It depends on the environment. For what I do, working at home is ideal - I go into the office one day a week for "face time" with project managers, developers, testers, and my manager, and spend the rest of the time at home, working my ass off. My whole team works like that. We simply don't have time for extraneous meetings - we're professionals, and we know what we need to do without micromanagement or hand holding.
 
2012-04-01 12:38:15 PM

Lsherm: Creoena: /Except when there are screaming kids and barking dogs in the background throughout a meeting

One of my team members got written up because his goddamn dog would bark on every conference call he was on. He had to go to remedial telework training (yes, we have such a thing) TWICE. And he biatched about it both times before he finally started locking the dog out of the room when he was on the phone.

I don't think he understood how close he was to getting fired - if your boss repeatedly tells you that you are unprofessional on the phone - the problem is you, not your boss. If your boss actually says "I'm sending you to the same training you just had last month because once again you sat in on a conference call with a barking dog, even after we asked you ON THE CALL to shut the dog up" - well, you should get the hint.

Now if we have a conference call and someone is making background noise, we stop the meeting until we identify and stop the noise. It's nice to have a procedure down for it, because most people these days are self-centered assholes who don't understand that other people can hear everything they are doing while they are on the phone. I was on a call with 8 people and one woman answered her home phone while she was on the conference call.


It's a good thing we don't have that background noise policy at my workplace or we'd have about 5 minutes of actual productivity over a one hour period.

My now former boss (he's still there, my dept got moved to another area) used to have staff meetings every Thursday, but he'd work from home about 1/2 the time on Thursdays and so we'd have a call instead. During the whole thing, the dog would be barking in the background. It got to the point where I'd just work on my in the meeting and do other work, and wouldn't say anything other than "I agree with the dog".
 
2012-04-01 12:40:31 PM

T.M.S.: I wish that were true but lots of things can only be done in person.

And there are still people who don't use email at all.


You're right in a sense; personal contact is a requirement for sucessful work. But SIX STRAIGHT HOURS OF MEETINGS EVERY DAY? No. Even one hour a day is farking obtuse.

People don't keep in touch electronically at work? Whether it's e-mail or informal chat apps? Fire them. Seriously. There are millions of more effective people in this world who could take their place. I'm not a hardass, mind. I just expect people to do their jobs when they bother to show up at work. Politically I lean pretty damn left, but I have no patience for slackers. Fire them.
 
2012-04-01 12:40:31 PM

Creoena: instead. During the whole thing, the dog would be barking in the background. It got to the point where I'd just work on my in the meeting and do other work, and wouldn't say anything other than "I agree with the dog".


Work on my laptop*
 
2012-04-01 12:40:37 PM

Cyclonic Cooking Action: Gothnet: Cyclonic Cooking Action: DNRTFA

But IBM did a study a while back and found people had higher productivity at home, so my wife works from home as does everyone she works with at the company. I don't think the whole of IBM does but...


Is that the same IBM that is now allowing WFH where absolutely necessary, but calling people back to the office otherwise?
(I don't know about IBM US, but they are recalling homeworkers in other places)

Might be but I haven't heard of it yet. She used to work with people in the UK who did WFH as well as quite a few other countries, and is now exclusively North America. We are in Orange County, CA and I believe they shut one of their local offices down almost completely. But let me put it this way, I wouldn't doubt anything IBM did. =D


They're now having IT staff in the office, yet still giving them all the tools to work from home. Part of their GDF thing.
 
2012-04-01 12:41:30 PM
My IT department went to work at home or wherever about 2 years ago, about 30% of the staff choose to go into the office each day for the gossip etc. The help desk staff work at home if they choose, they have things set up where the helpdesk line rolls to whatever phone they are near. I am in meetings (vitual) about 60% of the time and can multitask when they get boring, I usually only care about 10 minutes of a one hour meeting so my productivity goes way up if I can multitask. I gave up my cube last year, as did about 20% of the staff, saving the company $$. On the rare occasion I do go into work my pc is in a shared cube, no problem, it is about every other month when a vendor demo comes to town
 
2012-04-01 12:42:08 PM

Ozarkhawk: I am much more productive at home. Of course, I have a pair of 27 inch screens at home, and can pull up documents on one and do the work on the other.


Just 2 27"ers?

:)

i41.tinypic.com
 
2012-04-01 12:45:37 PM

vegasj: Ozarkhawk: I am much more productive at home. Of course, I have a pair of 27 inch screens at home, and can pull up documents on one and do the work on the other.

Just 2 27"ers?

:)

[i41.tinypic.com image 350x262]


nub league

Portrait oriented documents require a portrait-tilted display.
 
2012-04-01 12:49:36 PM
I work from home full time, and the work day is much more efficient. For example, I don't have to drive an hour and spend the first hr of the day chatting about crap I don't care about. When I was in the office, most people were working extremely slowly so they could pretend to work for 8 hrs. Some were blatantly shoe shopping online.

My boss took a lot of convincing because he thinks people who aren't in the office don't do anything which is absurd since he has sales people who are in other states, and he's never in the office because he needs to go take his kids to the zoo. How about you know I'm working because you see the dozens of projects that get completed every day?

Haven't been in the office for 6 months and hopefully I never have to.
 
2012-04-01 12:51:02 PM
I work from home and I probably do work harder at home then I did when I was in the office simply because I feel, as an at-home worker, people are paying more attention to my turnaround time then they did when I was at the office.
 
2012-04-01 12:53:12 PM

casual disregard: Portrait oriented documents require a portrait-tilted display.


program on right, remote session on center, email/doc on left...

or X-Box on right, Fark on center, Netflix on right...

:D

 
2012-04-01 12:53:59 PM

slotz: For me, it became all about the tossing. I got very little work done at home. Too easy to get "distracted."


what I do is to disconnect my wireless, go into another room and only use my phone for internet on 3G for say, looking up windows API reference. I've still got "productive internet" while "fapping internet" isn't easy to reach.
 
2012-04-01 12:57:30 PM

Fuggin Bizzy: T.M.S.: And there are still people who don't use email at all.

I can't imagine hiring somebody that doesn't use email. "Oh, you only use a corded rotary-dial phone and an IBM Selectric typewriter? That's okay, we'll all just work around your luddite ass."


I meant people such as clients we work with. Many of those don't use email at all.

I agree hiring someone that out of the loop would be counterproductive.
 
2012-04-01 12:58:39 PM

liverleef: I work from home about 75% of the time. The rest of the time is business travel to visit clients. When I work from home Im not as productive. Frankly, I hate it. Some day I'll likely get laid off as will most of my coworkers. I dread job hunting in this economy but I really look forward to working in an office again, being surrounded by other people, the daily routines, etc. I know it sounds crazy if you've been immersed in cubicle life for years but I miss it.


The sad truth of full time working from home revealed.

//4 years. It makes you kind of a weird person.
 
2012-04-01 01:02:46 PM
I've worked from home for about 10 years.

Socially isolated.

Heavy pot smoker.

In retrospect, probably not the best thing for me.
 
2012-04-01 01:07:54 PM
I can't work from home. How else would by boss micromanage me? Plus, when I am talking to a coworker about a project we are working on and need to coordinate together (who he found out I also happen to be friends with outside of work), how is he going to yell at me about wasting time, since I know them outside of work, I clearly am just chatting?
 
2012-04-01 01:11:01 PM
As the lead software engineer at the company I work for, I have a LOT of responsibilities when I'm at the office. Usually that means I'm spending my days answering questions or in meetings or assisting junior developers. This leaves little, if any time for heads down development. I do most of my coding at home, it's quiet and I can get in the zone without being interrupted. I can get things done in a few hours that would take me all week at the office.

But yeah, I don't trust my junior developers to get anything done when they say they are working from home. And yes, there are days when "working from home" means I'm doing something else... but my boss and I have an agreement and I'm salaried, so I am allowed to set my own schedule. I either deliver on my deadlines or I don't.
 
2012-04-01 01:14:19 PM
My last company used to allow people to work from home. In theory, why not? It was a software house and everything I needed to do could be done just as well from home.

But, my coworkers were largely lazy sons-of-biatches....

So, you'd see an e-mail go out at 9am saying 'I'll be WFH (Working From Home) Today'.

Then, you'd see nothing else.

They wouldn't respond to e-mails. They wouldn't check in source code. They wouldn't close tickets. They did nothing. All day. 'Working from home'. Some of them would respond to e-mail...but that was it. Virtually nobody did any actual work. They abused the system until, finally, the bosses put 2 and 2 together and said, 'No more'.

Last I heard they were being sued for failing to provide functional software after collecting millions in payments. Pretty disgusting stuff, IMHO.
 
2012-04-01 01:16:00 PM

halotosis: As the lead software engineer at the company I work for, I have a LOT of responsibilities when I'm at the office. Usually that means I'm spending my days answering questions or in meetings or assisting junior developers. This leaves little, if any time for heads down development. I do most of my coding at home, it's quiet and I can get in the zone without being interrupted. I can get things done in a few hours that would take me all week at the office.

But yeah, I don't trust my junior developers to get anything done when they say they are working from home. And yes, there are days when "working from home" means I'm doing something else... but my boss and I have an agreement and I'm salaried, so I am allowed to set my own schedule. I either deliver on my deadlines or I don't.


So long as the deadlines are reasonable - I agree with that philosophy :)
 
2012-04-01 01:22:32 PM

Fark_Guy_Rob: My last company used to allow people to work from home. In theory, why not? It was a software house and everything I needed to do could be done just as well from home.

But, my coworkers were largely lazy sons-of-biatches....

So, you'd see an e-mail go out at 9am saying 'I'll be WFH (Working From Home) Today'.

Then, you'd see nothing else.

They wouldn't respond to e-mails. They wouldn't check in source code. They wouldn't close tickets. They did nothing. All day. 'Working from home'. Some of them would respond to e-mail...but that was it. Virtually nobody did any actual work. They abused the system until, finally, the bosses put 2 and 2 together and said, 'No more'.

Last I heard they were being sued for failing to provide functional software after collecting millions in payments. Pretty disgusting stuff, IMHO.


I'm kind of surprised nobody was called out for not being on instant messenger or not responding to it, etc.
 
2012-04-01 01:23:22 PM
I work just fine at home except that code base synchs and such are slow as hell through vpn. So I often go into the office because it's just plain easier, and less annoying. But then I only live 3 miles from the office, and I can go in a old t-shirt and sweatpants, which is the same thing I wear around the house anyway.
 
2012-04-01 01:31:06 PM
I have been working from home for the last 18 months because my SO moved for his job. I see both pros and cons

Pros
- I can keep my own schedule. I work when I am productive, I don't when I am not. Essentially, I get more done because I don't regiment myself to conform to a time frame that may or may not work for me. As someone with a chronic illness, this is great for me.
- Food, bathroom, nap space are all steps away.
- My work is task-oriented: I get it done or I don't.

Cons
- Really easy to fark off
- l tend to feel guilty about not working. It sometimes results in me working a lot more often than I should.
- Inconsistent productivity
- Socially isolated
- SO has variable work schedule. When he is home and I am trying to work, things don't always get done.

The way I get around some of the cons is by setting deadlines for myself. They are not always realistic but it helps to get stuff done. Also, I justify my shorter work days because I don't have all the other distractions that come from an office environment: people chatting, phone ringing for other stuff, fewer emails... Also, my work requires lots of concentration and thinking so it is really difficult to be productive for 8 hours every day. However, when I want to talk about an idea I have, it's more difficult to mull it over with others.

All in all, it's not bad but I won't do it for my whole career. This contract ends probably at the end of the year and after that I will likely look for something different. Also, if I had kids, this arrangement would not be possible is they were at home too. Cats are enough distraction for me...
 
2012-04-01 01:31:45 PM

Swoop1809: But how can we have the hourly standup scrum if you are working from home?? And don't get me started on the bi-hourly sit down scrum!


Ah I see your problem, you're assuming people using Agile are even being productive to start with. Biggest flaw in your thinking. Now if you put 16 points worth of analysis into the sprint we can discuss this further, otherwise it'll have to go into the backlog.
 
2012-04-01 01:32:52 PM

vegasj: sammyk: I haven't been to the office in 6 months and no one is expecting me there anytime soon. FSM bless my wonderful boss. Bonus: My high blood pressure seems to be cured.

Got ya beat... I haven't been in the office in almost 2 yrs. Living in PA, office is in Vegas.

My boss knows I'm pretty much available 24/7... something I wasn't even when I lived in Vegas. I'm up at 6am and due to the 3hr time difference I'm sometimes still working as emails & calls come in at 7-8pm my time.

Works out good... because they know if I take a Monday away or I'm out... I'll be working Saturday and/or Sunday to get my things done.


Call it even. For the most part I'm 9-5. But when its called for I throw down on a 16 hour day. That earns me the privilege of saying "meh, I got personal shiat to do" and not catch any grief over it.
 
2012-04-01 01:40:44 PM

Cyclonic Cooking Action: Fark_Guy_Rob: My last company used to allow people to work from home. In theory, why not? It was a software house and everything I needed to do could be done just as well from home.

But, my coworkers were largely lazy sons-of-biatches....

So, you'd see an e-mail go out at 9am saying 'I'll be WFH (Working From Home) Today'.

Then, you'd see nothing else.

They wouldn't respond to e-mails. They wouldn't check in source code. They wouldn't close tickets. They did nothing. All day. 'Working from home'. Some of them would respond to e-mail...but that was it. Virtually nobody did any actual work. They abused the system until, finally, the bosses put 2 and 2 together and said, 'No more'.

Last I heard they were being sued for failing to provide functional software after collecting millions in payments. Pretty disgusting stuff, IMHO.

I'm kind of surprised nobody was called out for not being on instant messenger or not responding to it, etc.


Even at my office,we're all required to be on IM, so we can communicate with each other, and if you're not, the supervisor will want to know why
 
Displayed 50 of 131 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report