If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(NASDAQ)   Experts: "rising demand for oil around the world and supply concerns stemming from Iran sanctions are driving prices at the pump"   (nasdaq.com) divider line 152
    More: Interesting, sanctions against Iran, Iran, Dow Jones Newswires, U.S. Energy Information Administration, Senate Hearing, oil exports, crude oil  
•       •       •

1271 clicks; posted to Politics » on 31 Mar 2012 at 1:04 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



152 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-03-31 06:23:39 PM
i think the obvious answer is a full-scale invasion followed by an 8.5 year bloody occupation and "reconstruction"

right?
 
2012-03-31 06:24:33 PM

winterwhile: vygramul: winterwhile: vygramul:

As Greg Mankiw (American Enterprise Institute, so you should approve of the source) says, society faces a short-run tradeoff between inflation and unemployment. Mankiw would say that printing money helps curb unemployment.

oh good

lets print baby print, fark the folks who actually saved money

just Fark the middle class, yea baby lets do it

cause when you print money, it goes down in value


You should avoid drinking any water whatsoever. Ever. Because people drown in that stuff.

Retard.
 
2012-03-31 07:12:54 PM
god damn there's a lot of stupid in this thread.
 
2012-03-31 07:22:48 PM
My 2 cents

There is a difference between a good rising in price due to a change in value and a good rising in price due to increased liquidity in the market.

The FED more or less told the world "Well its our money but its your problem". And I think you are seeing the consequence of that message in rising commodity prices.

//Cheers.
 
2012-03-31 07:56:54 PM

dinch: If I remember right, wasn't Sadam pushing to start exchanging in Euros? Then And so the whole "boom boom" started up.


Fixed that for you. We went into Iraq because Saddam was going to move his oil trading away from the dollar. We knew he wasn't connected to Al Qaeda, we clearly didn't give a shiat what he did to his people, and he was reluctantly complying with the UN inspections.
 
2012-03-31 08:07:25 PM

wotthefark: 0bama's mother was a Canadian.


It's true. All a big conspiracy.


0bama's real girlfriend is in Canada. It's true.

0bama's car was made in Quebec, Canada, making him a French Socialist whore.

0bama wears clothes made in Canada, making him a Commie Muslim from the capital of France, which is Kenya. Kenya's now the capital of France ever since the Socialist Muslims took over. Which 0bama is the leader of! You lemmings have never heard of this news because you don't get the Truth from Rush Limbaugh.
 
2012-03-31 08:12:42 PM
This just in from the No Shiat Sherlock news desk...
 
2012-03-31 08:20:49 PM

Mugato: This is not a repeat from the minute after the dinosaurs got too big and fat and all died and became oil.

[www.wearysloth.com image 320x240]


i3.kym-cdn.com
OIL IS NOT DINOSAURS! GOODNIGHT!
 
2012-03-31 08:24:59 PM
So we are not pushing for more natural gas infrastructure why?
 
2012-03-31 08:26:44 PM
To hear the MSM, this is the first time in history the President has absolutely no control over the price of gas.
 
2012-03-31 08:26:49 PM

quatchi: Kinda used to them not mentioning the fact that US domestic oil production under Obama is at an 8 year high with more oil rigs in production any time since the late 80s (nu-pop)


The majority of the permits for that increase came during the Bush years. It is incorrect to credit Obama for the increase in domestic production simply because the permits applied for years ago came to fruition recently.

I'm not blaming or crediting Obama: I'm just pointing out a fact.
 
kab
2012-03-31 08:30:50 PM

hubiestubert: Translated: "Because we can, b*t ches"


Done in two.
 
2012-03-31 08:50:54 PM

downpaymentblues: quatchi: Kinda used to them not mentioning the fact that US domestic oil production under Obama is at an 8 year high with more oil rigs in production any time since the late 80s (nu-pop)

The majority of the permits for that increase came during the Bush years. It is incorrect to credit Obama for the increase in domestic production simply because the permits applied for years ago came to fruition recently.

I'm not blaming or crediting Obama: I'm just pointing out a fact.


True, but this still negates the premise that we can drill our way to cheap oil id only Obama would let us.
 
2012-03-31 09:05:51 PM
I'm glad the Resource WarriorsTM have decided they can make money without actually going to war in the Middle East.

At least we'll save a few thousand American lives that way.

/Too bad about all those unemployed contractors.
/Wolfowitz et al. can eat shiat
 
2012-03-31 09:07:05 PM
All the previous BS aside....
DUH!

It's the only real thing the President can do to affect gas prices...
Fark with Iran, and Iran farks back.

/Sounds like something Ron Paul would say except without the fark.
 
2012-03-31 09:11:31 PM

winterwhile: vygramul: winterwhile: Mrtraveler01: Obviously what we need to do is to build a pipeline that would take oil that would've been destined for the Midwest and sell it on the world market.

or we could just print more money

you do know the value of the dollar is in no way tied to the price of oil?

So lets print another 2 trillion, and spend it?

Worked last time Obama did it... right?

There's actually good reason to believe there is an insufficient supply of US currency. Also, inflation has been pretty darn low, so all this concern over "printing money" is pretty retarded.

So the US dollar falling is a good thing? Print more money..... works?

Did you ask the Germans? Or any body with savings about that?


By exhibiting concern on the matter, you're kind of proving his point.
 
2012-03-31 09:20:07 PM

GAT_00: 1. The US purchases no Iranian oil and has not for years.
2. US oil demand, the highest in the world, is the lowest it's been since the 1990s.
3. Speculation is absolutely occurring and raising the price. You're simply wrong if you say otherwise. That's just a fact.
4. Speculation is legal and occurs in every other commodity, and in each of those is responsible for at least some price rise, so pretending it isn't happening is like pretending the sun didn't rise today.
5. The same people who say that oil speculation is good for a free market also refuse to end tax breaks to the most profitable businesses in the country, on the grounds that a fair market is bad.
6. There is a sharp disconnect between gas prices, gas demand, and oil prices. Oil prices rise, triggering an instant gas price rise when the supply of higher oil won't reach the pump as gas for a month at minimum. The rise in price also reduces the demand for gas.
7. Supply is relatively constant. Oil production does not vastly increase or decrease on a daily basis, and Iran has been cut off for some time.

Combine all this together, and you have steady supply, rising prices, falling demand and only one variable: speculation.

Now tell me again how speculation can't be raising prices, or disprove any of the above.


The abundant supply of natural gas in the US has speculated the price down to $1.98/MMBtu.
 
2012-03-31 09:32:11 PM

downpaymentblues: quatchi: Kinda used to them not mentioning the fact that US domestic oil production under Obama is at an 8 year high with more oil rigs in production any time since the late 80s (nu-pop)

The majority of the permits for that increase came during the Bush years. It is incorrect to credit Obama for the increase in domestic production simply because the permits applied for years ago came to fruition recently.

I'm not blaming or crediting Obama: I'm just pointing out a fact.


I'm not crediting or blaming Obama either.

Just noting that the narrative of him being a big old wet blanket on American energy concerns, a big green meanie strangling them in regulations and red tape and driving the price of gas upwards presumably while laughing maniacally is made up of whole cloth.

Looking with a non partisan eye at where Obama has gone on oil, nuclear, natural gas and alternative energy in the last three years one can see a comprehensive strategy that defies that RW derp narrative completely is all I'm trying to say here.

Their inability to factor in such things as speculators and an increase in global demand and factors like Iran as we see explained in the article and in the thread here belies a certain deliberate and willful disregard of the facts on their part. They also can't seem to wrap their heads around the simple fact that beyond dipping into the Strategic Petroleum Reserves and announcing he'll do so again if necessary in order to calm the market (which he's already done, btw) (nu-pops) a POTUS doesn't really doesn't have a lot of control over global gas prices. That seems a bit silly too.
 
2012-03-31 09:54:33 PM

elchip: Mrtraveler01: winterwhile: Karac: Wait a minute - you mean people exist outside the US, and that they're part of the demand part of supply & demand? WTF are these furriners doing with the oil that belongs to us?

sounds like we need another war??// Lybia's already taken.

Are you the only troll that didn't go to Vegas?

The threads are eerily quiet today.

I think he'd get lost in the airport.



Best part, forever...
 
2012-03-31 10:02:13 PM
I didn't see what anyone else wrote on the Fark comment section nor the article's.

THIS IS A LIE >>>> The idea that speculative traders are making oil more expensive is a "minority view," Horsnell said. "And I think it's an incorrect view based on faulty analysis."
Hope the next world war allows me to shoot you against the wall. That is all.
 
2012-03-31 10:12:13 PM

downpaymentblues: quatchi: Kinda used to them not mentioning the fact that US domestic oil production under Obama is at an 8 year high with more oil rigs in production any time since the late 80s (nu-pop)

The majority of the permits for that increase came during the Bush years. It is incorrect to credit Obama for the increase in domestic production simply because the permits applied for years ago came to fruition recently.

I'm not blaming or crediting Obama: I'm just pointing out a fact.


But I've been assured by right wing radio listeners is that not a single new well has opened in the last three years because Obama has been blocking all the permitting processes.
 
2012-03-31 10:14:37 PM

jso2897: winterwhile: vygramul:

By exhibiting concern on the matter, you're kind of proving his point.


I have no concern, let the Middle class get Farked by the dem-o-rats, as they print baby print

Fark your savings..... the dem-o-rats spent it

best part

forever
 
2012-03-31 10:17:07 PM

BSABSVR: downpaymentblues: quatchi: Kinda used to them not mentioning the fact that US domestic oil production under Obama is at an 8 year high with more oil rigs in production any time since the late 80s (nu-pop)

The majority of the permits for that increase came during the Bush years. It is incorrect to credit Obama for the increase in domestic production simply because the permits applied for years ago came to fruition recently.

I'm not blaming or crediting Obama: I'm just pointing out a fact.

True, but this still negates the premise that we can drill our way to cheap oil id only Obama would let us.


We have drilled our way to cheap natural gas.
 
2012-03-31 10:42:40 PM

winterwhile: jso2897: winterwhile: vygramul:

By exhibiting concern on the matter, you're kind of proving his point.

I have no concern, let the Middle class get Farked by the dem-o-rats, as they print baby print

Fark your savings..... the dem-o-rats spent it

best part

forever


Awww... poor baby's lack of education leaves him scared - just the way the GOP likes you. So you believe anything you're told about the big bad Democrats. I'm sorry your party and your cause are so neutered that they can't protect you from destroying your life and savings. I'm sure you'll be lucky to afford a loaf of bread next year.

I'll be sure to give you $2 to wash the windows of my Lexus when I see you.
 
2012-03-31 10:45:36 PM

winterwhile: jso2897: winterwhile: vygramul:

By exhibiting concern on the matter, you're kind of proving his point.

I have no concern, let the Middle class get Farked by the dem-o-rats, as they print baby print

Fark your savings..... the dem-o-rats spent it

best part

forever


Cut&paste are hard wurk! I got a biznes of mi own! Wach me rite bad wurds! I hav no originul thots!
 
2012-03-31 11:24:17 PM
img528.imageshack.us
 
2012-04-01 12:02:00 AM

winterwhile: jso2897: winterwhile: vygramul:

By exhibiting concern on the matter, you're kind of proving his point.

I have no concern, let the Middle class get Farked by the dem-o-rats, as they print baby print

Fark your savings..... the dem-o-rats spent it

best part

forever


You make Fark suck. But it's ok cause Drew most likely subsidizes your tripe
 
2012-04-01 12:27:32 AM
Oil demand hasn't come close to supply in a long, long time. Iran's portion is nowhere near significant.

If there's weather, oil will go up. If there's someone who will pay, oil will go up. If it's a day that ends in Y, oil will go up. We all know you're lying through your teeth now.
 
2012-04-01 01:41:41 AM
winter while is the most effective troll ever. I've seen him derail threads he's not even in
 
2012-04-01 03:58:17 AM

GAT_00: 1. The US purchases no Iranian oil and has not for years.
2. US oil demand, the highest in the world, is the lowest it's been since the 1990s.
3. Speculation is absolutely occurring and raising the price. You're simply wrong if you say otherwise. That's just a fact.
4. Speculation is legal and occurs in every other commodity, and in each of those is responsible for at least some price rise, so pretending it isn't happening is like pretending the sun didn't rise today.
5. The same people who say that oil speculation is good for a free market also refuse to end tax breaks to the most profitable businesses in the country, on the grounds that a fair market is bad.
6. There is a sharp disconnect between gas prices, gas demand, and oil prices. Oil prices rise, triggering an instant gas price rise when the supply of higher oil won't reach the pump as gas for a month at minimum. The rise in price also reduces the demand for gas.
7. Supply is relatively constant. Oil production does not vastly increase or decrease on a daily basis, and Iran has been cut off for some time.

Combine all this together, and you have steady supply, rising prices, falling demand and only one variable: speculation.

Now tell me again how speculation can't be raising prices, or disprove any of the above.


You forgot the greatest variable of all: we have President Fartbongo, and it's entirely his fault when prices go up.
 
2012-04-01 04:03:50 AM
Building an ultra-modern city in the middle of a desert isn't cheap.
img818.imageshack.us
GIS Dubai if you don't believe me.
 
2012-04-01 06:59:32 AM

winterwhile: jso2897: winterwhile: vygramul:

By exhibiting concern on the matter, you're kind of proving his point.

I have no concern, let the Middle class get Farked by the dem-o-rats, as they print baby print

Fark your savings..... the dem-o-rats spent it

best part

forever


Yup - that's what I mean.
 
2012-04-01 07:02:25 AM
The price of gas is high because we refuse to build a pipeline to the moon.

True story.
 
2012-04-01 08:20:42 AM

GAT_00: .


This post makes me frustrated that I missed this thread

Ill see you later
 
2012-04-01 09:12:34 AM

jso2897: winterwhile: jso2897: winterwhile: vygramul:

By exhibiting concern on the matter, you're kind of proving his point.

I have no concern, let the Middle class get Farked by the dem-o-rats, as they print baby print

Fark your savings..... the dem-o-rats spent it

best part

forever

Yup - that's what I mean.


analyize me.Doc... do I have a condition?

BTW I want the good drugs, not the old cheep ones
 
2012-04-01 09:19:03 AM

red5ish: Building an ultra-modern city in the middle of a desert isn't cheap.
[img818.imageshack.us image 634x420]
GIS Dubai if you don't believe me.


Oil and gas is NOT the major source of income for Dubai. That city has been built on income from real estate, construction, financial services, tourism etc.
 
2012-04-01 10:55:17 AM

MisterRonbo: Moopy Mac

And that paragraph that you quoted isn't necessarily about speculation. Isn't speculation a part of demand

Uh, no.

"the fundamentals of supply and demand "

Fundamentals. As in, not speculation. Demand is actual consumption. Speculation is a derivative based on the projected direction and rate of change in demand. Just as acceleration is a derivative of velocity, and is not relevant when you are stating the speed you're traveling at a specific moment. I can't read the word "fundamentals" and think it includes speculation.

I can see why the CEO of Exxon would say that speculation adds a significant amount to the cost of a barrel of oil, but what benefit would Forbes/GS receive from saying the same thing?

Just a guess on my part, but you're selling a magazine whose audience consists of financial professionals and the customers of their services. Promoting the idea that there is a whole lot of speculation affecting the markets seems like a message your advertisers, who sell investment advice, would like to promote.

I know, I'm such a cynic...


"Fundamentals. As in, not speculation. Demand is actual consumption. Speculation is a derivative based on the projected direction and rate of change in demand. Just as acceleration is a derivative of velocity, and is not relevant when you are stating the speed you're traveling at a specific moment. I can't read the word "fundamentals" and think it includes speculation."

That article specifically says that the price above $118 are due to fears of Iran. So you are arguing that speculation (other than those that may be related to Iran) has zero effect on the price of oil. That's exactly what you are saying. Do you feel comfortable making that statement?


"Just a guess on my part, but you're selling a magazine whose audience consists of financial professionals and the customers of their services."

Which is completely different than the audience of The Economist?
 
2012-04-01 11:52:44 AM

Dansker: red5ish: Building an ultra-modern city in the middle of a desert isn't cheap.
[img818.imageshack.us image 634x420]
GIS Dubai if you don't believe me.

Oil and gas is NOT the major source of income for Dubai. That city has been built on income from real estate, construction, financial services, tourism etc.


But mostly real estate. Dubai's economic power is all a show, the economy tanked there a few years back because...you guessed it...real estate speculation.
 
2012-04-01 12:06:41 PM

Mrtraveler01: Dansker: red5ish: Building an ultra-modern city in the middle of a desert isn't cheap.
[img818.imageshack.us image 634x420]
GIS Dubai if you don't believe me.

Oil and gas is NOT the major source of income for Dubai. That city has been built on income from real estate, construction, financial services, tourism etc.

But mostly real estate.


Yes, not oil, so you agree that red5ish is barking up the wrong tree.
 
2012-04-01 12:59:08 PM

Moopy Mac: MisterRonbo: Moopy Mac

And that paragraph that you quoted isn't necessarily about speculation. Isn't speculation a part of demand

Uh, no.

"the fundamentals of supply and demand "

Fundamentals. As in, not speculation. Demand is actual consumption. Speculation is a derivative based on the projected direction and rate of change in demand. Just as acceleration is a derivative of velocity, and is not relevant when you are stating the speed you're traveling at a specific moment. I can't read the word "fundamentals" and think it includes speculation.

I can see why the CEO of Exxon would say that speculation adds a significant amount to the cost of a barrel of oil, but what benefit would Forbes/GS receive from saying the same thing?

Just a guess on my part, but you're selling a magazine whose audience consists of financial professionals and the customers of their services. Promoting the idea that there is a whole lot of speculation affecting the markets seems like a message your advertisers, who sell investment advice, would like to promote.

I know, I'm such a cynic...

"Fundamentals. As in, not speculation. Demand is actual consumption. Speculation is a derivative based on the projected direction and rate of change in demand. Just as acceleration is a derivative of velocity, and is not relevant when you are stating the speed you're traveling at a specific moment. I can't read the word "fundamentals" and think it includes speculation."

That article specifically says that the price above $118 are due to fears of Iran. So you are arguing that speculation (other than those that may be related to Iran) has zero effect on the price of oil. That's exactly what you are saying. Do you feel comfortable making that statement?


"Just a guess on my part, but you're selling a magazine whose audience consists of financial professionals and the customers of their services."

Which is completely different than the audience of The Economist?


No,fear of an attack on Iran is the very definition of speculation. Fear drives speculation.
 
2012-04-01 01:35:05 PM

MisterRonbo: Moopy Mac: MisterRonbo: Moopy Mac

And that paragraph that you quoted isn't necessarily about speculation. Isn't speculation a part of demand

Uh, no.

"the fundamentals of supply and demand "

Fundamentals. As in, not speculation. Demand is actual consumption. Speculation is a derivative based on the projected direction and rate of change in demand. Just as acceleration is a derivative of velocity, and is not relevant when you are stating the speed you're traveling at a specific moment. I can't read the word "fundamentals" and think it includes speculation.

I can see why the CEO of Exxon would say that speculation adds a significant amount to the cost of a barrel of oil, but what benefit would Forbes/GS receive from saying the same thing?

Just a guess on my part, but you're selling a magazine whose audience consists of financial professionals and the customers of their services. Promoting the idea that there is a whole lot of speculation affecting the markets seems like a message your advertisers, who sell investment advice, would like to promote.

I know, I'm such a cynic...

"Fundamentals. As in, not speculation. Demand is actual consumption. Speculation is a derivative based on the projected direction and rate of change in demand. Just as acceleration is a derivative of velocity, and is not relevant when you are stating the speed you're traveling at a specific moment. I can't read the word "fundamentals" and think it includes speculation."

That article specifically says that the price above $118 are due to fears of Iran. So you are arguing that speculation (other than those that may be related to Iran) has zero effect on the price of oil. That's exactly what you are saying. Do you feel comfortable making that statement?


"Just a guess on my part, but you're selling a magazine whose audience consists of financial professionals and the customers of their services."

Which is completely different than the audience of The Economist?

No,fear of an atta ...


So speculation around an attack on Iran is the only speculation that moves the price? That seems to be your argument (at least if you are relying on that article to say that only $7 out of a barrel of oil is because of speculation).

Look back at what was posted and what you've said. You've said that speculation is not part of "fundamentals of supply and demand". And you are relying on an article that says the fundamentals of supply and demand put the price at $118 and the other $7 in a barrel of oil is because of fears of Iran. Therefore you are saying that the only speculation that moves the price of oil is the $7 geopolitical risk speculation surrounding disruptions due to Iran. Do you believe that?
 
2012-04-01 02:40:51 PM

Dansker: Mrtraveler01: Dansker: red5ish: Building an ultra-modern city in the middle of a desert isn't cheap.
[img818.imageshack.us image 634x420]
GIS Dubai if you don't believe me.

Oil and gas is NOT the major source of income for Dubai. That city has been built on income from real estate, construction, financial services, tourism etc.

But mostly real estate.

Yes, not oil, so you agree that red5ish is barking up the wrong tree.


Agreed.
 
2012-04-01 04:09:27 PM

GAT_00: 1. The US purchases no Iranian oil and has not for years.
2. US oil demand, the highest in the world, is the lowest it's been since the 1990s.
3. Speculation is absolutely occurring and raising the price. You're simply wrong if you say otherwise. That's just a fact.
4. Speculation is legal and occurs in every other commodity, and in each of those is responsible for at least some price rise, so pretending it isn't happening is like pretending the sun didn't rise today.
5. The same people who say that oil speculation is good for a free market also refuse to end tax breaks to the most profitable businesses in the country, on the grounds that a fair market is bad.
6. There is a sharp disconnect between gas prices, gas demand, and oil prices. Oil prices rise, triggering an instant gas price rise when the supply of higher oil won't reach the pump as gas for a month at minimum. The rise in price also reduces the demand for gas.
7. Supply is relatively constant. Oil production does not vastly increase or decrease on a daily basis, and Iran has been cut off for some time.

Combine all this together, and you have steady supply, rising prices, falling demand and only one variable: speculation.

Now tell me again how speculation can't be raising prices, or disprove any of the above.


It does not matter how much oil we purchase from Iran. Oil is a global commodity with many producers and sellers. A concern about the availability of Iranian oil affects the people who do use it like Europe, India and China. If oil is cut off from Iran, those countries will now have to start consuming Norwegian, Canadian, US and Russian Oil at an increased rate.

Decrease in supply, static or increased demand = increase in price. Speculators simply bet on the likelyhood of this happening

Since you failed ECON101, there's really no reason to address anything else you've said.
 
2012-04-01 04:25:29 PM

o5iiawah: Speculators simply bet on the likelyhood of this happening


Neither that, nor anything else you said, is at odds with the notion that speculation can drive up prices.
 
2012-04-01 04:47:37 PM

o5iiawah: Since you failed ECON101, there's really no reason to address anything else you've said.


According to him, if everyone in the world stopped using oil, it would not affect our oil prices at all.
 
2012-04-02 02:03:56 AM

Serious Black: That can't be true! Rush Limbaugh told me Obama is causing gas prices to skyrocket because of his Kenyan Muslim socialist policies, and Rush would never lie. He's the kindest, most good-hearted person I know.


You need to get out more.
 
2012-04-02 02:47:36 AM
The U.S. is an exporter of refined gasoline. That is all.

/Hint: supply is not an issue. Double hint: When clueless foreign policy stops being clueless, bubble will burst.
 
2012-04-02 07:26:01 AM

Yankees Team Gynecologist: o5iiawah: Speculators simply bet on the likelyhood of this happening

Neither that, nor anything else you said, is at odds with the notion that speculation can drive up prices.


Progressives still think that fixing the prices of commodities is the answer to rising prices, rather than mitigating the symptons. It might have worked in the New Deal era with things that we chiefly controlled but it will never work with oil. As long as there are stock exchanges, people will be betting on commodities.

Mitigate the affects of concern by reducing demand, increasing supply or easing the supply concerns and watch the speculators go the other way. They didn't just wake up at $1.65 oil on Jan 20, 2009 and decide to almost triple the prices for the lulz
 
2012-04-02 09:57:41 AM

o5iiawah: Yankees Team Gynecologist: o5iiawah: Speculators simply bet on the likelyhood of this happening

Neither that, nor anything else you said, is at odds with the notion that speculation can drive up prices.

Progressives still think that fixing the prices of commodities is the answer to rising prices, rather than mitigating the symptons. It might have worked in the New Deal era with things that we chiefly controlled but it will never work with oil. As long as there are stock exchanges, people will be betting on commodities.

Mitigate the affects of concern by reducing demand, increasing supply or easing the supply concerns and watch the speculators go the other way. They didn't just wake up at $1.65 oil on Jan 20, 2009 and decide to almost triple the prices for the lulz


The last time an American Progressive tried to fix the price of commodities it led to years of runaway inflation.

And then he got caught sending people to break into the Watergate Hotel.
 
2012-04-02 10:16:24 AM
Speculators seem to be doing their jobs well. The current administration is unfriendly to fossil fuel production and it now seems likely that Obama will be reelected. It would also seem unlikely that Obama's governance will move right during his 2nd term and so is likely to become more unfriendly to further production. Combine that with the saber rattling over Iran as well as china and India's increasing thirst for oil the price is likely to go up in the future.

The law of supply and demand, you cant explain that.
 
Displayed 50 of 152 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report