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(Some MajorGeek)   Visa and MasterCard are warning of what they call a "massive breach" that could involve as many as 10 million compromised credit card numbers   (majorgeeks.com) divider line 115
    More: Scary, credit card numbers, MasterCard, visas, breaching experiment  
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15004 clicks; posted to Main » on 30 Mar 2012 at 9:36 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-03-30 09:34:57 AM
Wait, so this affects people with cards from credit unions and Visa/Mastercard directly? Does it affect people who're still with, say, BoA or Wells Fargo or Citigroup?
 
2012-03-30 09:38:04 AM
This is why I only use debit cards.
 
2012-03-30 09:39:46 AM
If only there was some kind of chip and security number we could use to secure our credit cards in this country...
 
2012-03-30 09:40:38 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: This is why I only use debit cards.


Debit cards can be breached too. I know, I just had a card replaced due to possible breaching.

/Why, yes, it's a Mastercard
 
2012-03-30 09:40:40 AM
Fark credit cards. They're a giant racket.

/15-30% interest?
//it's bullshiat
 
2012-03-30 09:40:46 AM
The actual article:

http://krebsonsecurity.com/2012/03/mastercard-visa-warn-of-processor -b reach/

Krebs reports the breach was between Jan-Feb of this year at a card processor, so it involves individual cards at multiple banks. The size? not sure yet (not reporting that).

However, from a similar breach reported in the article:

It's not clear how many cards were breached in the processor attack, but a sampling from one corner of the industry provides some perspective. On Wednesday, PSCU - a provider of online financial services to credit unions - said it alerted 482 credit unions that appear to have had cards impacted by the breach, and that a total of 56,455 member VISA and MasterCard accounts were compromised. PSCU said fraudulent activity had been detected on a relatively small number of those cards - 876 accounts - and that the activity was geographically dispersed.
 
2012-03-30 09:41:23 AM
www.hotboots.com

Massive breech?
 
2012-03-30 09:42:10 AM
So that why they sent that letter to me, great. This crap happens to me every year now. Wells Fargo student loan info leak 2 years ago. PSN last year. Now this. Is this just how I should expect my personal info to be treated with little penalty to those who lost said info?
 
2012-03-30 09:42:11 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: This is why I only use debit cards.


Does your debit card have a VISA or MC logo on it? If so, I don't think you're any safer. Someone please correct me if I'm mistaken.
 
2012-03-30 09:42:40 AM
Pretty much every time you hand your credit card to the stripper/waitress there's an opportunity for her to record your number, expiration date and security ID. And they hate it why I try to swipe the card between their butt cheeks.
 
2012-03-30 09:43:19 AM
My MasterCard information is private between me and Grable's Daughter.

Wait.. she's not the source of the leak, is she?
 
2012-03-30 09:43:46 AM
They are not saying which U.S based processor was the actual source but the affected banks are now analyzing the data hoping to find points of purchase.

What is the justification for keeping the source secret in these types of incidents? Knowing where the breach occurred could enable people to identify themselves if they were potentially affected and take their own steps to preempt possible fraud. I think that with 10 million possible pieces of stolen data, that should probably trump not embarrassing and potentially destroying whoever failed to properly protect that data in the first place.

I do not understand how identifying this particular information is not a basic consumer right in a situation like this. Is there some criminal or technical reason for it, or is it just a matter of protecting business from further backlash at the potential further expense of victims?
 
2012-03-30 09:43:58 AM

The Shatner Incident: Fark credit cards. They're a giant racket.

/15-30% interest?
//it's bullshiat


yah the other problem is credit unions are effected too and they don't have the ridiculous charges.
 
2012-03-30 09:44:13 AM
"It's not clear how many cards were breached in the processor attack, but a sampling from one corner of the industry provides some perspective. On Wednesday, PSCU - a provider of online financial services to credit unions - said it alerted 482 credit unions that appear to have had cards impacted by the breach, and that a total of 56,455 member VISA and MasterCard accounts were compromised. PSCU said fraudulent activity had been detected on a relatively small number of those cards - 876 accounts - and that the activity was geographically dispersed."


Well, that's comforting. I just happen to have a PSCU credit card. Guess I had better check my account.
 
2012-03-30 09:44:21 AM

Harry Freakstorm: Pretty much every time you hand your credit card to the stripper/waitress there's an opportunity for her to record your number, expiration date and security ID. And they hate it why I try to swipe the card between their butt cheeks.


The waitresses at Chuck E Cheese especially dislike it.
 
2012-03-30 09:44:52 AM
This might explain why my bank sent me a new credit card (with a new account number) out of the blue earlier this week. I sure as heck can't think of any other reason why they would have.
 
2012-03-30 09:45:06 AM

BurnShrike: My MasterCard information is private between me and Grable's Daughter.

Wait.. she's not the source of the leak, is she?


Do you swipe her ass crack to process payment?
 
2012-03-30 09:45:24 AM

digistil: AverageAmericanGuy: This is why I only use debit cards.

Does your debit card have a VISA or MC logo on it? If so, I don't think you're any safer. Someone please correct me if I'm mistaken.


It was undoubtedly a joke, in response to all the people who always warn about the dangers of debit cards.

// It's just your cards that will have a problem. Better start carrying a lot of bullion.
 
2012-03-30 09:45:40 AM

funzyr: BurnShrike: My MasterCard information is private between me and Grable's Daughter.

Wait.. she's not the source of the leak, is she?

Do you swipe her ass crack to process payment?


Not with my card I don't.
 
2012-03-30 09:45:40 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: This is why I only use debit cards.


A few weeks ago ( on a Friday afternoon no less ) I woke up from a nap and had a voicemail on my phone from Wells Fargo.

I call back and the guy literally sounds like James Earl Jones. He asks me if I spent $712 at Walmart. In Oakland , California ...I was like 'Wtf ?!' (Never been to CA)

Was an inconvenience because even though it was resolved , I had no debit card access for the entire weekend and had to borrow cash from a buddy. I never carry cash.
 
2012-03-30 09:47:06 AM
BoA or Wells Fargo or Citigroup say...
If only there was some way to get back all the costumers that moved to credit unions in the past year....
 
2012-03-30 09:49:33 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: This is why I only use debit cards.


A debit card is a credit card. A credit card directly tied to your checking account. So what would you rather have? A credit card maxed out because it was stolen or your checking out emptied out because the card was stolen?

/and debit cards don't have the same legal consumer protections as credit cards do
 
2012-03-30 09:49:37 AM

The Shatner Incident: Fark credit cards. They're a giant racket.

/15-30% interest?
//it's bullshiat


Only if your credit sucks.
 
2012-03-30 09:49:43 AM
I run a small business. The credit card industry rams a compliance audit down our throats every year. If we aren't compliant or have a security breach because we lied on our compliance audit, we get screwed with big fines and worse rates.

I wonder if these idiots will have to pay any fines or if the processors will give their customers better rates to make up for the obvious failure of their security measures? Probably not.
 
2012-03-30 09:50:41 AM
Thank god my accounts are closed while I pay off the ridiculous balances I ran up during my years of stupidity.
 
2012-03-30 09:50:53 AM

The Irresponsible Captain: If only there was some kind of chip and security number we could use to secure our credit cards in this country...


We certainly could have had chip-and-pin in the US for years now. Not that it wasn't a god-awful struggle, but most Americans have gotten past the "OMG I have to remember a PIN" hurdle.

The problem is that V/MC were trying to bypass that step and go straight to contactless.

Consumers: "Contactless? Really?"
V/MC: "Yeah... better than a monorail..."
Merchants: "Contactless? Really? A new $900 terminal when the few contactless cards out there can swipe anyway?"
V/MC: "Um, yeah... customers really hate swiping... takes too long"
Issuing banks: "Contactless? Really?"
V/MC: "Fine. Whatever. It's your losses in security breaches."
 
2012-03-30 09:51:30 AM
My credit union replaced my debit card in early Feb because of a possible breach. I have a friend whose bank did the same thing a week later.

Credit union lady was nice enough to let me go get money out of an ATM before she canceled the card (new one wouldn't arrive for a week).
 
2012-03-30 09:52:04 AM
Why DON'T they just issue all new cards when this happens? If they really cared about security vs the bottom line, we'd see that.
 
2012-03-30 09:53:04 AM
The report is pure bullshiat. All references to this supposed breech go back to a single "security" blogger -- a guy named Krebs. No reputable news vendor is carrying this story. Were it true, it would be all over the news. But so far, it is only being carried on computer geek blogs. My CU knows nothing about it and they are very good at communicating such problems to members and instructing us what to look out for.

So I'm waiting a while before I go all OMFGWAGD!!!!
 
2012-03-30 09:53:38 AM

syrynxx: [www.hotboots.com image 285x450]

Massive breech?


Goatse is the only massive breach I'm familiar with.
 
2012-03-30 09:53:46 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: This is why I only use debit cards.


My debit card (chase bank MasterCard ) was electronically stolen and used in NYC last Friday. I'm in Seattle and someone did a little shoe shopping and pharmacy purchases with my checking account before the bank locked the card. I was compensated for it and now have a new card. Keep an eye on your transactions.
 
2012-03-30 09:54:02 AM

Splinshints: I do not understand how identifying this particular information is not a basic consumer right in a situation like this. Is there some criminal or technical reason for it, or is it just a matter of protecting business from further backlash at the potential further expense of victims?


It's cute that you think we have consumer rights when it comes to finance in this country.
 
2012-03-30 09:54:23 AM
This actually happened to the distaffbopper and I: We both had to replace our cards because of activity we didn't authorize, first one back in January, second one in February. In both cases it was a charge for less than $10, and to our bank's credit, they immediately canceled the cards and sent us new ones, and while it took a little while for them to refund the fraudulent charges, they did eventually do so.

Luckily we check the account pretty much every single day, or that might have slipped past us.
 
2012-03-30 09:54:39 AM
About a year ago, I had 3 separate cards compromised within 1 week, including my daily-use card and 2 spares. No idea how they got the info, since they were 3 different banks, and one of the spares I hadn't used in maybe 5 years (and never on-line).

Anyway, in each case, the thief got away with no more than one $15 charge before the banks locked them down & called me. For the spares, that wasn't a surprise, but for the daily use card - which I use for everything from $2 bottles of pepsi to $12K on-line purchases of industrial hardware - I was amazed at how quick they picked up on the "bad" pattern.

Anyway, a few phone calls, one sign-and-return affidavit, and about a week waiting for new cards in the mail, and it was handled, at least from my perspective.
 
2012-03-30 09:54:44 AM

thecpt: So that why they sent that letter to me, great. This crap happens to me every year now. Wells Fargo student loan info leak 2 years ago. PSN last year. Now this. Is this just how I should expect my personal info to be treated with little penalty to those who lost said info?


What you should become aware of is that you shouldn't regard that information as *your* private information because there is zero liability if that information is compromised. Anything you do to protect that data is a favor you're doing to the bank and the retailers who accept your stolen credit card data. All you're saving yourself from is the slight nuisance of having to sign an affidavit from time to time saying that those charges weren't from you.
 
2012-03-30 09:55:17 AM

bravian: AverageAmericanGuy: This is why I only use debit cards.

A debit card is a credit card. A credit card directly tied to your checking account. So what would you rather have? A credit card maxed out because it was stolen or your checking out emptied out because the card was stolen?

/and debit cards don't have the same legal consumer protections as credit cards do


I think that you are only responsibility for up to $50 of fraudulent charges on a credit card. Debit cards don't have that protection and you may be liable for more or all of the fraudulent charges. I'm pretty sure about the $50 thing but I could also not be remembering correctly.
 
2012-03-30 09:55:38 AM

Splinshints: What is the justification for keeping the source secret in these types of incidents? Knowing where the breach occurred could enable people to identify themselves if they were potentially affected and take their own steps to preempt possible fraud. I think that with 10 million possible pieces of stolen data, that should probably trump not embarrassing and potentially destroying whoever failed to properly protect that data in the first place.


First off - its most likely an ongoing investigation and they don't have all the details yet. Second off - wherever this is occurred is feeling the pain right now. Not only from VISA who will now be fining the hell out of them (or denying them the ability to even process transactions anymore) but occurring huge costs to investigate and fix the issue. If they are small or don't have strong financial backing - its a very real possibility they will go out of business anyways.

/the last breach I dealt with cost two full time employees dedicated to the issue for up to a year, huge consultant fees to investigate what happened, and millions more to redesign the network and upgrade systems
//and they never did out exactly where the breach occurred thanks to sketchy network design
 
2012-03-30 09:55:49 AM

The Shatner Incident: Fark credit cards. They're a giant racket.

/15-30% interest?
//it's bullshiat


It hardly matters if you pay off the balance each month. My main card is 18.99% and I've never paid a penny in interest. I just rack up the sweet, sweet rewards.

Assuming you will always pay your balance off (and if you can't, don't get a credit card), you should choose your card based on rewards, customer service, etc. -- the APR is meaningless.
 
2012-03-30 09:57:22 AM
Just got my new card yesterday.

Thankfully the credit union notified me of weird charges after about $1500. They were able to block $1000 and Visa covered the rest.
 
2012-03-30 09:57:28 AM

dittybopper: This actually happened to the distaffbopper and I: We both had to replace our cards because of activity we didn't authorize, first one back in January, second one in February. In both cases it was a charge for less than $10, and to our bank's credit, they immediately canceled the cards and sent us new ones, and while it took a little while for them to refund the fraudulent charges, they did eventually do so.

Luckily we check the account pretty much every single day, or that might have slipped past us.


What crooks do, is they monitor that account, and if the charges are removed, they know it is active. Then they wait until a bunch of money is in there and clean you out.
 
2012-03-30 09:57:52 AM
Can someone explain to me why card processing plants are running this shiat through the regular internet? I know that its encrypted and all, but shiat.

In the Army we had SIPRNet. You may have heard about it (its how wikileaks got all of the diplomatic cables and the Iraq/Afghanistan shiat) and no one can crack it from the outside. Why cant their be a network like that with no connections to the regular net?
 
2012-03-30 09:58:19 AM

Jocundry: I think that you are only responsibility for up to $50 of fraudulent charges on a credit card. Debit cards don't have that protection and you may be liable for more or all of the fraudulent charges. I'm pretty sure about the $50 thing but I could also not be remembering correctly.


In the US its 50 bucks. However - banks have been waiving that because they want to retain trust in the system. But still - having your checking account cleared out takes days if not weeks to clear up. I rather have fraudulent charges on a credit card. Banks take care of that within hours or days.
 
2012-03-30 10:00:02 AM
This is why I took Glenn Beck's advice and switched to gold.

Sure, it is heavy, I now have crippling back issues, no one actually takes it as currency and I have been mugged 9 times and lost thousands....but I feel somewhat safer, and in the end, that is what is important.
 
2012-03-30 10:00:11 AM

Jocundry: responsibility


Responsible.

Friday morning + not enough coffee + too much wine last night.
 
2012-03-30 10:01:00 AM

ronaprhys: The Shatner Incident: Fark credit cards. They're a giant racket.

/15-30% interest?
//it's bullshiat

Only if your credit sucks.


I can get a five percent rate on a $20,000 vehicle loan and have great terms on it. Every credit card offer I have ever had included ridiculous terms involved, along with a low credit limit. Missing one payment can make your interest rate skyrocket. It's legal usury as far as I am concerned.

/paid off three vehicles in five years and missed a payment no problem
//had one credit card, missed a payment, company went apeshiat
///never again
 
2012-03-30 10:01:40 AM

cman: Can someone explain to me why card processing plants are running this shiat through the regular internet? I know that its encrypted and all, but shiat.

In the Army we had SIPRNet. You may have heard about it (its how wikileaks got all of the diplomatic cables and the Iraq/Afghanistan shiat) and no one can crack it from the outside. Why cant their be a network like that with no connections to the regular net?


That would be really expensive, since you would have to build a completely separate infrastructure.
 
2012-03-30 10:02:30 AM
How much mass are we talking about?
 
2012-03-30 10:04:39 AM

The Shatner Incident: Fark credit cards. They're a giant racket.

/15-30% interest?
//it's bullshiat


Assuming you have crappy credit and don't pay them off at once\in reasonable amounts of time.

I'm happy to take the float on my money while someone gives me rewards for doing it.
 
2012-03-30 10:04:53 AM

The Shatner Incident: Fark credit cards. They're a giant racket.

/15-30% interest?
//it's bullshiat


Interest? Pay it off every month. Get a card with great travel benefits. Go on free trips. Tada!
 
2012-03-30 10:07:00 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: This is why I only use debit cards.


cash for me, seen and heard too many of my friends getting their cards scammed
 
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