If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Yahoo)   Study shows that 20% of pharmacies tested lied to researchers posing as 17-year old girls about the availability of "the morning after pill"; falsely claiming either they didn't stock it, or that it was illegal for them to buy it   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 415
    More: Sick, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, morning-after pills, pharmacy, u.s. federal, unprotected sex, fertility medication, average cost  
•       •       •

13160 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Mar 2012 at 3:35 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



415 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-03-27 04:16:29 PM
IDK why anyone expected anything different.
Pharmacysts=other half of the highly vaunted "American Medical Community"
(35th best in the worlds positive outcomes and number one in profits)

Sincere apologies to those without a controlling sky wizard, brush gets a bit wide at times. Hard to control when screaming.
 
2012-03-27 04:17:57 PM
Coathangers and kicking a chick in the stomach still widely available.
 
2012-03-27 04:18:17 PM
...which, if I'm doing the math right, means that for every pharmacy that turns a 17-year-old girl down, there are 4 others that will sell her what she needs. Still sucks, but to put that in perspective, that's better odds than finding a loaf of Pepperidge Farm bread at the grocery store.

As for being incorrectly told that she "can't" get it...if in 2012 a teenager isn't educated enough to do a basic Google search, I'm inclined to doubt that teenager is informed enough to make life-changing decisions independently (or to raise a child, but that's a different conversation). Sad either way.
 
2012-03-27 04:19:33 PM

BronyMedic: impaler: A machine won't know about drug interactions.

Unless that machine is a computer hooked up to a database. In which case it could do it in a few milliseconds.

And those machines cost around two million dollars, break down pretty often, and require qualified pharmacists to restock them. Other than that, totally comparable.


Actually, they're free, give blowjobs, and can be run by toddlers.*

*Contains just as many facts as your moronic statement. It's not 1953, dude. Your iPhone could easily do the task described.
 
2012-03-27 04:19:56 PM

This text is now purple: lennavan: Cancer isn't a separate entity. It's a part of you. Is your heart or kidney a living organism?

Well, neither is an embryo, or a fetus up to a point. You cannot separate it, or it will die.

Cancer is genetically identical to the host organism; your embryo is not.


So what you're saying is, you know nothing about cancer? Okay then.
 
2012-03-27 04:22:49 PM
Nitpick, subby: 19%
 
2012-03-27 04:23:08 PM
hinten: Tell me about how you saved lifes today because only you can read the terrible handwriting of this one doctor or how only you were able to see the conflict between the two prescribed medicine. Because we would all love to hear about you are adding to the value chain.

Disintermediation biatches.


Because you're completely, utterly wrong about what Pharmacists do, and you're generalizing based on the experiences you have with the neighborhood drug store?

That would be my first guess. But hey, you're showing yourself to be an individual who proves Gabe's G.I.F. Theory, so keep it up! Let's see how much more crap you can spew out!
 
2012-03-27 04:23:23 PM
There is a right to refuse filling a prescription, just as there is a right to refuse giving medical treatment as long as it isn't a life-saving emergency:

Link

A lot of the pharmacists I talk to aren't against giving out OTC Plan B because they're anti-abortion/women's rights/whateverwargarrbl, but because mifepristone is a serious freaking drug and they don't want to be liable for giving a 17 year old kid, whose history may not even be known to them, something that might harm them more.

Kids should have access to it, but with a prescription. Trying to avoid as much contact with the doctor because they're embarrassed is akin to back-alley abortions (not drawing a parallel to right of life, just drawing a parallel to people avoiding medical professionals to avoid embarrassment), and when getting especially serious drugs, serious intervention should be considered for someone so young.
 
2012-03-27 04:24:08 PM

cman: This wouldnt be a problem if you would only put it up her pooper


I heard about a girl in college that let just about every date go in the ol' backdoor (if they wanted) but never vaginal because she wanted to preserve her virginity.

Never did get a date with her.
 
2012-03-27 04:25:45 PM
Mavent: *Contains just as many facts as your moronic statement. It's not 1953, dude. Your iPhone could easily do the task described.

Yep. Something an iPhone can do.

http://www.fhtinc.com/press/press40.html

DAYTONA BEACH, FL - October 30, 2008 - ForHealth Technologies, Inc., a pioneer in I.V. medication safety and hospital pharmacy automation, recently announced the installation of its robotic I.V. dose preparation system, IntelliFill i.v., at Methodist University Hospital, Memphis, TN. IntelliFill i.v. will enable the hospital's pharmacy to automate its I.V. drug preparation process to reduce medication errors, increase patient safety, and lower costs. The new system was activated in September 2008. Methodist University Hospital joins a rapidly expanding community of leading US hospitals putting the latest I.V. room technology from ForHealth to work to improve I.V. medication safety.
 
2012-03-27 04:27:39 PM

liverleef: Coathangers and kicking a chick in the stomach still widely available.


Hello, Walgreens? Can I come into your pharmacy and get a Falcon Punch, please?
 
2012-03-27 04:28:14 PM

BronyMedic: hosalabad: BronyMedic: /hospital - expecially ER pharmacists - are scary farking smart. The only woman I know who could rattle off every detail about propofol metabolism and action while pushing it.

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAH*gassssspppp*HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

No they aren't. You know one anomaly.

CrazyCracka420: BurnShrike: hinten: This, as in any pharmacy related thread, is where I point out that pharmacists could easily be replaced by trained monkeys. They add zero value to the transaction chain, as a matter if fact in this case, they become a hurdle between you, you doctor, and/or your medicine.
Trained monkeys might be overqualified for the pharmacist job.

But then there'll be a lack of trained monkeys for the IT field, driving up demand.

You're comparing dispensing the right number and amount of pills to your average IT worker? Even the lowest guys on the totem pole at the place I work use their brain more in an hour than a pharmacist (or pharm technician) would all week.

Why does it take 15 minutes to count out 15 pills and put them in a bottle? Wouldn't it be easier to let a machine handle this difficult task?

One guess on how I know you people have no clue what a Pharmacist does beyond what the one who works in Walgreens tells you when they hand you your prescription.


Is it because I have worked with them in a HOSPITAL for over a decade? Because that's how I know they are stupid. Nice guess on my profession, Fark hurts sometimes.
 
2012-03-27 04:29:05 PM
 
2012-03-27 04:29:24 PM

hosalabad: Is it because I have worked with them in a HOSPITAL for over a decade? Because that's how I know they are stupid. Nice guess on my profession, Fark hurts sometimes.


Mopping the floors doesn't count as being a colleague.
 
2012-03-27 04:30:02 PM
hosalabad: Is it because I have worked with them in a HOSPITAL for over a decade? Because that's how I know they are stupid. Nice guess on my profession, Fark hurts sometimes.

So what you're saying is, every pharmacist in every hospital is stupid because of one experience?

My, my. You might not have enough paint to go with that broad brush you're using. And I never attempted to guess your profession. I just called you a generalizing moron.

I guess FARK does hurt. Want me to walk down to the pharmacy and get you some cream for your butthurt?
 
2012-03-27 04:30:06 PM

BronyMedic: Mavent: *Contains just as many facts as your moronic statement. It's not 1953, dude. Your iPhone could easily do the task described.

Yep. Something an iPhone can do.

http://www.fhtinc.com/press/press40.html

DAYTONA BEACH, FL - October 30, 2008 - ForHealth Technologies, Inc., a pioneer in I.V. medication safety and hospital pharmacy automation, recently announced the installation of its robotic I.V. dose preparation system, IntelliFill i.v., at Methodist University Hospital, Memphis, TN. IntelliFill i.v. will enable the hospital's pharmacy to automate its I.V. drug preparation process to reduce medication errors, increase patient safety, and lower costs. The new system was activated in September 2008. Methodist University Hospital joins a rapidly expanding community of leading US hospitals putting the latest I.V. room technology from ForHealth to work to improve I.V. medication safety.


So to counter his argument that a pharmacist could be replaced by a robot hooked up to the internet, you posted an example of pharmacists being replaced by robots because a pharmacist has more errors, is less safe and more expensive?

I think you two are in agreement. You should hug it out.
 
2012-03-27 04:31:20 PM
As a retired pharmacist, I'm getting a kick out of this thread.
It seems like a poorly constructed study to me, as it's written up in TFA.
Pharmacy clerical and support staff do not have the same level of knowledge and training as an R.Ph., and for this study to group all pharmacy personnel together (as it sounds like was done) seems improper to me.
As far as pharmacists being replaced by trained monkeys, I doubt if you would want that. We do add to the value chain, but it's difficult to quantify. Sadly, many folks out there cannot understand how to take their meds properly, and they can't get an MD on the phone to go over it with them. I used to do a lot of counseling to older and less literate people about which pills do what, since they always dumped all their meds into one vial. A colleague of mine definitely saved an old guy's life when the man confused two different cardiac drugs that were on completely different dosing schedules. Trained monkey won't catch that, nor will a machine. There are plenty of people out there who can get along without any real clinical input from their pharmacist, but it's preferable to have it available for those who cannot.
 
2012-03-27 04:32:43 PM

CornerPocket: It seems like a poorly constructed study to me, as it's written up in TFA.


Nah, it's a poorly constructed article with a trolly Fark.com headline. The study seems fine.
 
2012-03-27 04:32:49 PM
MightyPez: Mopping the floors doesn't count as being a colleague.

Oh, snap.

The Dunning-Kruger is strong with this one, MightyPez. I'm beginning to sense wife-like typing.
 
2012-03-27 04:33:00 PM
Wellon Dowd: Who could say No Plan B for you! to this face?

Wow, there's a whole list of things I'd like to do to that face, and I bet every item on that list would upset these pharmacists even more.
 
2012-03-27 04:34:12 PM
This text is now purple and BronyMedic, I appreciate you attempting to explain how pharmacies are run in the US. I was unaware that they were meant to be a final "stop gap" after the doctor.

impaler: CrazyCracka420: You're comparing dispensing the right number and amount of pills to your average IT worker? Even the lowest guys on the totem pole at the place I work use their brain more in an hour than a pharmacist (or pharm technician) would all week.

Why does it take 15 minutes to count out 15 pills and put them in a bottle? Wouldn't it be easier to let a machine handle this difficult task?

A machine won't know about drug interactions.

Unless that machine is a computer hooked up to a database. In which case it could do it in a few milliseconds.


I'd personally want a non-fundy human being be the one looking into that sort of thing, all the more reason this sort of thing upsets me.
/works in IT
 
2012-03-27 04:35:07 PM

Buffalo77: FirstNationalBastard

I see no problem with this, as long as the pharmacies are consistent and refuse to sell cancer drugs to anyone because those bastards with cancer are trying to kill a living, growing organism that's in their body.


So you're classifying pregnancy as disease?

Are you one of those that says we shouldn't treat fat people because they are directly responsible for being fat by overeating, or smokers should not be treated because they gave themselves cancer by smoking? you know, to keep health care costs low.


What??? Thats not even a Poe's Law situation, thats obviously sarcasm! He's not trolling, or even a conservitard!

/gawd, i hope im not making an [even larger] idiot of myself by flaming a potential troll.
 
2012-03-27 04:35:32 PM
Crotchrocket Slim: This text is now purple and BronyMedic, I appreciate you attempting to explain how pharmacies are run in the US. I was unaware that they were meant to be a final "stop gap" after the doctor.

impaler: CrazyCracka420: You're comparing dispensing the right number and amount of pills to your average IT worker? Even the lowest guys on the totem pole at the place I work use their brain more in an hour than a pharmacist (or pharm technician) would all week.

Why does it take 15 minutes to count out 15 pills and put them in a bottle? Wouldn't it be easier to let a machine handle this difficult task?

A machine won't know about drug interactions.

Unless that machine is a computer hooked up to a database. In which case it could do it in a few milliseconds.

I'd personally want a non-fundy human being be the one looking into that sort of thing, all the more reason this sort of thing upsets me.
/works in IT


I'm more scared at the amount of people who think Medicine is something that can be done according to a cookbook or protocol that a machine reads off of, and are willing to argue tooth and nail about it. It kinda reminds me of the thread a few months ago where you had someone insisting a nurse's job could be done by a robot.
 
2012-03-27 04:35:38 PM

BronyMedic: MightyPez: Mopping the floors doesn't count as being a colleague.

Oh, snap.

The Dunning-Kruger is strong with this one, MightyPez. I'm beginning to sense wife-like typing.


Had to chime in as I grew up with someone that became a pharmacist. It's insane how much she knew. The studies, the internships, and placement are farking ridiculous.
 
2012-03-27 04:35:38 PM

CornerPocket: A colleague of mine definitely saved an old guy's life


This colleague of yours, was his name George Bailey?
reske.us
/apparently not Gower
 
2012-03-27 04:37:22 PM

BronyMedic: hosalabad: Is it because I have worked with them in a HOSPITAL for over a decade? Because that's how I know they are stupid. Nice guess on my profession, Fark hurts sometimes.

So what you're saying is, every pharmacist in every hospital is stupid because of one experience?

My, my. You might not have enough paint to go with that broad brush you're using. And I never attempted to guess your profession. I just called you a generalizing moron.

I guess FARK does hurt. Want me to walk down to the pharmacy and get you some cream for your butthurt?


What good would that do? I'm not a patient here. You don't even know how it works, do you?
 
2012-03-27 04:37:53 PM
MightyPez: Had to chime in as I grew up with someone that became a pharmacist. It's insane how much she knew. The studies, the internships, and placement are farking ridiculous.

I'm more than happy to set up a clinical shadow time for anyone who thinks all a pharmacist does is read scripts and count pills all day to come to the system I work for and spend a 24 hour shift in Pharmacy. The amount of work a single pharmacist does in a major hospital is insane.
 
2012-03-27 04:38:10 PM
I can't really judge them too harshly. I spent my adolescence lying to teenage girls.
 
2012-03-27 04:39:55 PM

MBooda: CornerPocket: A colleague of mine definitely saved an old guy's life

This colleague of yours, was his name George Bailey?
[reske.us image 320x240]
/apparently not Gower


George Bailey?

No one here by that name in Pottersville.
 
2012-03-27 04:40:18 PM
I bet all these politicians, pundits, and other finger-waggers would change their rhetoric if we stopped calling it birth control, and started calling it pregnancy control.
 
2012-03-27 04:41:01 PM

MightyPez: hosalabad: Is it because I have worked with them in a HOSPITAL for over a decade? Because that's how I know they are stupid. Nice guess on my profession, Fark hurts sometimes.

Mopping the floors doesn't count as being a colleague.


No, c'mon, don't hurt Dr. Juan Itor!

/neutral on whomever is legit
 
2012-03-27 04:42:41 PM
Watch in amazement! as all the people who routinely decry James O'Keefe's support a "study" that uses the same techniques O'Keefe uses!

/"We pretended to be someone we weren't for the sake of embarrassing our political opponents."
//"It's different when we do it."
///"Because we do 'studies'. "
 
2012-03-27 04:42:56 PM

CornerPocket: As a retired pharmacist, I'm getting a kick out of this thread.
It seems like a poorly constructed study to me, as it's written up in TFA.
Pharmacy clerical and support staff do not have the same level of knowledge and training as an R.Ph., and for this study to group all pharmacy personnel together (as it sounds like was done) seems improper to me.
As far as pharmacists being replaced by trained monkeys, I doubt if you would want that. We do add to the value chain, but it's difficult to quantify. Sadly, many folks out there cannot understand how to take their meds properly, and they can't get an MD on the phone to go over it with them. I used to do a lot of counseling to older and less literate people about which pills do what, since they always dumped all their meds into one vial. A colleague of mine definitely saved an old guy's life when the man confused two different cardiac drugs that were on completely different dosing schedules. Trained monkey won't catch that, nor will a machine. There are plenty of people out there who can get along without any real clinical input from their pharmacist, but it's preferable to have it available for those who cannot.


And here is my favorite argument: "You really need me and my job because those other people (actual medical doctors) are not doing THEIR jobs."

Tell me, how does it feel having dedicated your life and your career to something that is basically checking on potential errors of the work of others? Fullfilling?
Congratulations, you have dedicated your life to quality control the original work of others but haven't added any value yourself.
 
2012-03-27 04:44:00 PM
hinten: And here is my favorite argument: "You really need me and my job because those other people (actual medical doctors) are not doing THEIR jobs."

Tell me, how does it feel having dedicated your life and your career to something that is basically checking on potential errors of the work of others? Fullfilling?
Congratulations, you have dedicated your life to quality control the original work of others but haven't added any value yourself.


We're still waiting on you to prove you're not a wife-like typer and provide proof for the statements you've made. Otherwise, you're a perfect example of Dunning-Kruger.

hosalabad: What good would that do? I'm not a patient here. You don't even know how it works, do you?

I don't have to be Gregory House to diagose you with a case of Butthurt, 3rd Degree and Craniorectal Insertion Syndrome.
 
2012-03-27 04:45:04 PM

lennavan: 19 percent of 17-year-old callers were told that they could not obtain emergency contraception under any circumstances, while 3 percent of physicians were told their 17-year-old patient could not obtain it.

I see 19% of people are uninformed, I don't see the blatant lie.


Your math. It needs help.
 
2012-03-27 04:46:00 PM
hinten
Tell me, how does it feel having dedicated your life and your career to something that is basically checking on potential errors of the work of others? Fullfilling?
Congratulations, you have dedicated your life to quality control the original work of others but haven't added any value yourself.


Talk about not adding any value.....Have you been a complete asshole all your life?
 
2012-03-27 04:46:39 PM

This text is now purple: lennavan: Cancer isn't a separate entity. It's a part of you. Is your heart or kidney a living organism?

Well, neither is an embryo, or a fetus up to a point. You cannot separate it, or it will die.

Cancer is genetically identical to the host organism; your embryo is not.


Actually it is not, that's what makes it a cancer.
 
2012-03-27 04:47:15 PM

cman: This wouldnt be a problem if you would only put it up her pooper


My mother signed me up for an "upperclassman adviser" for my first month of college. She was supposed to help me find my classes, buy text books, show me around campus and all the important things to getting adjusted. She took me to a frat party, showed me how RAs can't search in closed closets so you can hid a second mini fridge in there for your beer, how you should hide clear booze in water bottles so it looks like water, ect.

Though on the first day, she told me very seriously, "they might have told you how to not get pregnant in high school, but there is only one fool-proof method: anal."

I didn't know many girls who were pregnant in college. Most I knew said they couldn't afford the pill or didn't want their parents to find out about it, and guys tended to whine about condoms from what I heard, so pretty much everyone I knew was willing to take it up the butt. The clap on the other hand, everyone seemed to have that.
 
2012-03-27 04:47:33 PM

hinten: CornerPocket: As a retired pharmacist, I'm getting a kick out of this thread.
It seems like a poorly constructed study to me, as it's written up in TFA.
Pharmacy clerical and support staff do not have the same level of knowledge and training as an R.Ph., and for this study to group all pharmacy personnel together (as it sounds like was done) seems improper to me.
As far as pharmacists being replaced by trained monkeys, I doubt if you would want that. We do add to the value chain, but it's difficult to quantify. Sadly, many folks out there cannot understand how to take their meds properly, and they can't get an MD on the phone to go over it with them. I used to do a lot of counseling to older and less literate people about which pills do what, since they always dumped all their meds into one vial. A colleague of mine definitely saved an old guy's life when the man confused two different cardiac drugs that were on completely different dosing schedules. Trained monkey won't catch that, nor will a machine. There are plenty of people out there who can get along without any real clinical input from their pharmacist, but it's preferable to have it available for those who cannot.

And here is my favorite argument: "You really need me and my job because those other people (actual medical doctors) are not doing THEIR jobs."

Tell me, how does it feel having dedicated your life and your career to something that is basically checking on potential errors of the work of others? Fullfilling?
Congratulations, you have dedicated your life to quality control the original work of others but haven't added any value yourself.


Editors are a godsend in any literary industry, quality assurance in others. Quality control is an integral part of any organization that gives a damn about fulfilling its purpose. Do you have any rational reason there should be one less quality control with regard to medicine (bear in mind I'm assuming the pharmacist is doing the job properly without pushing their beliefs on others)?
 
2012-03-27 04:48:16 PM

This text is now purple: lennavan: Cancer isn't a separate entity. It's a part of you. Is your heart or kidney a living organism?

Well, neither is an embryo, or a fetus up to a point. You cannot separate it, or it will die.

Cancer is genetically identical to the host organism; your embryo is not.


Identical? (new window) Read the first sentence in the first bullet of section 3 and tell me what's wrong with your assertion that cancer is genetically identical to the host organism.

/ "missing or altered" != "identical"
 
2012-03-27 04:48:51 PM

cman: This wouldnt be a problem if you would only put it up her pooper


Study shows that 20% of pharmacies tested lied to researchers posing as 17-year-old girls about the availability of over-the-counter Ass Cream.
 
2012-03-27 04:50:00 PM

lennavan: This text is now purple: lennavan: Cancer isn't a separate entity. It's a part of you. Is your heart or kidney a living organism?

Well, neither is an embryo, or a fetus up to a point. You cannot separate it, or it will die.

Cancer is genetically identical to the host organism; your embryo is not.

So what you're saying is, you know nothing about cancer? Okay then.


They're damaged cells, but they're you.
 
2012-03-27 04:50:07 PM

New Farkin User Name: MightyPez: hosalabad: Is it because I have worked with them in a HOSPITAL for over a decade? Because that's how I know they are stupid. Nice guess on my profession, Fark hurts sometimes.

Mopping the floors doesn't count as being a colleague.

No, c'mon, don't hurt Dr. Juan Itor!

/neutral on whomever is legit


Ok, I understood the Scrubs part, but not the last part.
 
2012-03-27 04:50:33 PM

BronyMedic: hinten: Tell me about how you saved lifes today because only you can read the terrible handwriting of this one doctor or how only you were able to see the conflict between the two prescribed medicine. Because we would all love to hear about you are adding to the value chain.

Disintermediation biatches.

Because you're completely, utterly wrong about what Pharmacists do, and you're generalizing based on the experiences you have with the neighborhood drug store?

That would be my first guess. But hey, you're showing yourself to be an individual who proves Gabe's G.I.F. Theory, so keep it up! Let's see how much more crap you can spew out!


Ok, so then WHAT DO PHARMACISTS DO THAT A TRAINED MONKEY CAN'T DO?

You keep arguing this point but are not providing any contrary evidence.
 
2012-03-27 04:50:51 PM

BronyMedic: hinten: And here is my favorite argument: "You really need me and my job because those other people (actual medical doctors) are not doing THEIR jobs."

Tell me, how does it feel having dedicated your life and your career to something that is basically checking on potential errors of the work of others? Fullfilling?
Congratulations, you have dedicated your life to quality control the original work of others but haven't added any value yourself.

We're still waiting on you to prove you're not a wife-like typer and provide proof for the statements you've made. Otherwise, you're a perfect example of Dunning-Kruger.

hosalabad: What good would that do? I'm not a patient here. You don't even know how it works, do you?

I don't have to be Gregory House to diagose you with a case of Butthurt, 3rd Degree and Craniorectal Insertion Syndrome.


Prove something to you? I think we are unclear of our roles in this thread. You are the monkey that is here to dance and entertain others. We are the audience watching. Now get to it.
 
2012-03-27 04:53:09 PM

BronyMedic: impaler: A machine won't know about drug interactions.

Unless that machine is a computer hooked up to a database. In which case it could do it in a few milliseconds.

And those machines cost around two million dollars, break down pretty often, and require qualified pharmacists to restock them. Other than that, totally comparable.


actually, here is where you lost credibility. Pharmacy machines and the software to run them cost on average 60K to purchase and in the range of 2-3K per month for the service plans. The machine may break down, (I question your frequently tag), but the software won't databases are pretty bulletproof considering just about every one uses enterprise DB's heck even the open source ones have ridiculous up times. They can display any and all drug interactions, as well as keep a better medical history than a pharmacist can, I'd trust the ram in the computer, rather than the memory of a pharmacist. If the machine breaks down you do have the option of telling an employee to put x of y pill in bottle z and give it to the customer, along with a print out of the side effects and conflicts. They don't even have to know what they are selling they fill the prescription and no preaching to go with it. problem solved.
 
2012-03-27 04:53:25 PM

cman: This wouldnt be a problem if you would only put it up her pooper


I didn't realize the morning after pill was a suppository.
 
2012-03-27 04:53:33 PM

thisone: Sgt Otter: Banned on the Run: If it's OK to refuse to go to war as a conscientious objector, why is it not OK to refuse to dispense morning after pills?


/yes, I see the difference
//those pharmacists are douchebags

Actually COs can be soldiers, and go to war. They're just restricted to being chaplains or having jobs in the Medical Corps.

So they do the job they have. They just avoid ones that would come into conflict with their stand on non-violence, like infantry or armored cavalry.

and also I assume that a true CO would be a dangerous person to have in the front lines.


this one certainly was-for the enemy anyway:
www.militaryimages.net
 
2012-03-27 04:53:39 PM

hinten: BronyMedic: hinten: And here is my favorite argument: "You really need me and my job because those other people (actual medical doctors) are not doing THEIR jobs."

Tell me, how does it feel having dedicated your life and your career to something that is basically checking on potential errors of the work of others? Fullfilling?
Congratulations, you have dedicated your life to quality control the original work of others but haven't added any value yourself.

We're still waiting on you to prove you're not a wife-like typer and provide proof for the statements you've made. Otherwise, you're a perfect example of Dunning-Kruger.

hosalabad: What good would that do? I'm not a patient here. You don't even know how it works, do you?

I don't have to be Gregory House to diagose you with a case of Butthurt, 3rd Degree and Craniorectal Insertion Syndrome.

Prove something to you? I think we are unclear of our roles in this thread. You are the monkey that is here to dance and entertain others. We are the audience watching. Now get to it.


You sure you're the circus master here? Three separate Farkers called you to task for stupidity in the quality control post.
 
2012-03-27 04:54:01 PM

BronyMedic: And those machines cost around two million dollars, break down pretty often, and require qualified pharmacists to restock them.


Actually, my cell phone can run apache and mysql. Someone just needs to build the database and web page to access it.

Laptops sell at Best Buy for $300 that can do this.

/no wonder health care is so expensive
 
Displayed 50 of 415 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report