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(SFGate) Video Largest ship in North America, the MS Fabiola, a 1200' container ship capable of carrying 12,500 containers, 50 miles of them if laid end to end, with her crew of 21 has just entered San Francisco Bay. And you are there   (sfgate.com ) divider line
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13692 clicks; posted to Video » on 23 Mar 2012 at 10:15 AM (4 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-03-23 10:20:18 AM  
Slideshow alert!

/Seriously, that's one huge ass-ship.
 
2012-03-23 10:22:00 AM  
Jesus, please, save us, from poor syntax. And commas.
 
2012-03-23 10:22:07 AM  
I recently visited a shipyard in Germany. It's kind of weird to enter a building and see a full sized cruise ship sitting in the water with the engines running. (they flood the factory to do power tests)

Then you move toward the center of the enormous room and see four full sized ships sitting there.

Your brain cannot grasp the scale.
 
2012-03-23 10:23:33 AM  
All your eggs in one basket ?
 
2012-03-23 10:25:01 AM  
We need to import more lead dipped donuts.
 
2012-03-23 10:30:38 AM  
Hopefully a rogue wave doesn't come along and take that mother out. 12,000 containers is a lot of stuff to lose.
 
2012-03-23 10:31:50 AM  
I pay people to move things out of SF and OAK ports all of the time here at work. (Freight brokerage) Some of the stuff I move on a regular basis is probably on that ship. Pretty amazing feat of engineering. Neat stuff.
/not subby
 
2012-03-23 10:32:31 AM  
That's a lot of Happy Meal toys.
 
2012-03-23 10:35:05 AM  
Newest San Fransisco phrase: Fabiola!
 
2012-03-23 10:39:47 AM  
How long does it take to load 12,500 containers onto a ship?
 
2012-03-23 10:40:14 AM  
wow. is the bay difficult to navigate in such a big ship? or, do people always get pilots when they're close to land?

/ i'm only familiar with the way we do stuff on the mississippi. and those pilots make some very serious cash. but, the mississippi is apparently quite treacherous.
 
2012-03-23 10:44:15 AM  

T.M.S.: I recently visited a shipyard in Germany. It's kind of weird to enter a building and see a full sized cruise ship sitting in the water with the engines running. (they flood the factory to do power tests)


I went to Groton, CT for the launch of the Seawolf (SSN-21). We had to walk through a building where the USS Louisiana (SSBN-743) was being worked on and I was amazed at the size. Subs are boats and small compared to a lot of ships but the one thing I remember is the smoke from the barbecue inside the the building stopped rising before it got to the ceiling. I can only imagine how big some of these cargo ships are.
 
2012-03-23 10:44:39 AM  

Grapple: Hopefully a rogue wave doesn't come along and take that mother out. 12,000 containers is a lot of stuff to lose.


A company I worked for once lost a container full of our most sold product over the sides. We had a bunch of backorders on the item too. I felt bad for the CSRs who had to explain that, as apparently most people did not accept that.
 
2012-03-23 10:45:22 AM  
That's some awesome reporting.
 
2012-03-23 10:53:38 AM  

Cheron: T.M.S.: I recently visited a shipyard in Germany. It's kind of weird to enter a building and see a full sized cruise ship sitting in the water with the engines running. (they flood the factory to do power tests)

I went to Groton, CT for the launch of the Seawolf (SSN-21). We had to walk through a building where the USS Louisiana (SSBN-743) was being worked on and I was amazed at the size. Subs are boats and small compared to a lot of ships but the one thing I remember is the smoke from the barbecue inside the the building stopped rising before it got to the ceiling. I can only imagine how big some of these cargo ships are.


I was there for Seawolf's INSURV trials. Louisiana was still under construction at that time. I also thought the assembly hanger was pretty awesome. Especially the crisscross of railroad tracks they used to move components around.
 
2012-03-23 10:54:06 AM  

pute kisses like a man: wow. is the bay difficult to navigate in such a big ship? or, do people always get pilots when they're close to land?

/ i'm only familiar with the way we do stuff on the mississippi. and those pilots make some very serious cash. but, the mississippi is apparently quite treacherous.


I think most US ports require a local pilot to bring the ship into port. And yes, those local guys make big money doing that.
 
2012-03-23 10:58:12 AM  
That's a huge biatch

/Behemoth
 
2012-03-23 10:59:11 AM  

pute kisses like a man: wow. is the bay difficult to navigate in such a big ship? or, do people always get pilots when they're close to land?

/ i'm only familiar with the way we do stuff on the mississippi. and those pilots make some very serious cash. but, the mississippi is apparently quite treacherous.


The video said they had three harbor pilots aboard the thing to handle the job ;)
 
2012-03-23 11:02:55 AM  
So WalMart is gearing up for a Memorial Day sale?
 
2012-03-23 11:07:16 AM  
Any guesses as to how much of the shiat in those containers people actually need?

I'll set the over/under at 6%.
 
2012-03-23 11:10:04 AM  

Teknowaffle: I felt bad for the CSRs who had to explain that, as apparently most people did not accept that.


Ugh. Customers suck. I'm glad I rarely have to deal with them.

/suppliers suck, too
 
2012-03-23 11:10:56 AM  

helper_monkey: I think most US ports require a local pilot to bring the ship into port. And yes, those local guys make big money doing that.


NPR just had a story about harbor pilots; the average salary nationwide is $450K/year. LA/LB pilots, being civil servants, pull a mere $380K. Well deserved, IMHO; I've driven quite a few ships in and out of ports and the disaster that would be a grounded freighter (commercially, environmentally, logistically) in a major shipping channel is difficult to comprehend. The pilots really know their stuff and the pre-reqs for the job are huge.
 
2012-03-23 11:11:42 AM  
Hey, I went through the slide show, but I didn't see how many containers the ship could carry nor the length of the vessel. Wat do?

in all seriousness, that's a big ship! Cool show.
 
2012-03-23 11:11:49 AM  

SpinStopper: pute kisses like a man: wow. is the bay difficult to navigate in such a big ship? or, do people always get pilots when they're close to land?

/ i'm only familiar with the way we do stuff on the mississippi. and those pilots make some very serious cash. but, the mississippi is apparently quite treacherous.

The video said they had three harbor pilots aboard the thing to handle the job ;)


What were they doing, steering by consensus?
 
2012-03-23 11:12:56 AM  

helper_monkey: pute kisses like a man: wow. is the bay difficult to navigate in such a big ship? or, do people always get pilots when they're close to land?

/ i'm only familiar with the way we do stuff on the mississippi. and those pilots make some very serious cash. but, the mississippi is apparently quite treacherous.

I think most US ports require a local pilot to bring the ship into port. And yes, those local guys make big money doing that.


they were just doing a story on NPR about that very thing, it said they can charge up to 6000 dollars for a pilot to move 1 ship in or out and they get paid from 300k to 450k a year.
 
2012-03-23 11:27:19 AM  
IT'S A TRICK!!!!! The ship is full of Russian Soldiers and their equipment!!! The invasion of America has begun!!!!


/Just played through World In Conflict again the other day
 
2012-03-23 11:33:04 AM  
Not expecting much from a container ship, but that is a truly ugly ship to sail the sea.
 
2012-03-23 11:33:36 AM  

Cheron: T.M.S.: I recently visited a shipyard in Germany. It's kind of weird to enter a building and see a full sized cruise ship sitting in the water with the engines running. (they flood the factory to do power tests)

I went to Groton, CT for the launch of the Seawolf (SSN-21). We had to walk through a building where the USS Louisiana (SSBN-743) was being worked on and I was amazed at the size. Subs are boats and small compared to a lot of ships but the one thing I remember is the smoke from the barbecue inside the the building stopped rising before it got to the ceiling. I can only imagine how big some of these cargo ships are.


For a second I thought you means SSN-575 and I was like, damn, you old.
 
2012-03-23 11:36:50 AM  
Cybernetic:
How long does it take to load 12,500 containers onto a ship?

About a day.

The normal load/unload turnaround time frame for a really big container ship is about 48 hours.
 
2012-03-23 11:40:54 AM  

Headso: helper_monkey: pute kisses like a man: wow. is the bay difficult to navigate in such a big ship? or, do people always get pilots when they're close to land?

/ i'm only familiar with the way we do stuff on the mississippi. and those pilots make some very serious cash. but, the mississippi is apparently quite treacherous.

I think most US ports require a local pilot to bring the ship into port. And yes, those local guys make big money doing that.

they were just doing a story on NPR about that very thing, it said they can charge up to 6000 dollars for a pilot to move 1 ship in or out and they get paid from 300k to 450k a year.


down here (along the gulf part of the mississippi) those pilot licenses are practically inherited too. you can't just go become a pilot.

although, some one in my wife's family become a pilot and it was very controversial. I think it's a great-great-aunt-second-cousin, or god knows what. the common ancestor is a great-grandfather.

the story was told to me by father in law, and i wasn't paying close attention, so parts of this may be fuzzy:

well, this woman became a river pilot, somehow. the group of river pilots either denied her license, or prevented her from work, based on the fact she was a woman. so, she sued them for discrimination. pending the lawsuit, she became a nun. they settled out of court for over a million. the settlement also meant that she was not a river pilot.

her becoming a nun was basically the reason for the settlement. no one wanted to go before a jury and argue against a nun in southeastern louisiana.

she donated all that money to the church. years later she quit being a nun and had kids. this is where it gets really fuzzy in my memory: i think her kids eventually wanted to say that the donation to the church was not valid, so they could get a piece. (i might have made that last part up, but I know someone attacked the donation)
 
2012-03-23 11:58:26 AM  

comicsworthreading.com

"Fabiola!!!"

 
2012-03-23 12:04:36 PM  

The_Sheriff_Is_A_Niiii: IT'S A TRICK!!!!! The ship is full of Russian Soldiers and their equipment!!! The invasion of America has begun!!!!


/Just played through World In Conflict again the other day


No, it's a dirty nuke tucked into a container

I forget where i read that idea years ago
 
2012-03-23 12:13:13 PM  

factoryconnection: helper_monkey: I think most US ports require a local pilot to bring the ship into port. And yes, those local guys make big money doing that.

NPR just had a story about harbor pilots; the average salary nationwide is $450K/year. LA/LB pilots, being civil servants, pull a mere $380K. Well deserved, IMHO; I've driven quite a few ships in and out of ports and the disaster that would be a grounded freighter (commercially, environmentally, logistically) in a major shipping channel is difficult to comprehend. The pilots really know their stuff and the pre-reqs for the job are huge.


Just to be clear, I don't have any issue with them getting paid big money. As you said, the cost of a screw-up justifies it.
 
2012-03-23 12:17:21 PM  

helper_monkey: Just to be clear, I don't have any issue with them getting paid big money. As you said, the cost of a screw-up justifies it.


How many years until an ANSI/IEEE/ROOMBA device takes over?
 
2012-03-23 12:39:07 PM  
"If all the girls who attended the Yale prom were laid end to end, I wouldn't be a bit surprised."
--Dorothy Parker
 
2012-03-23 01:04:34 PM  
I like this snark from the comments, and the replies.

"CBS reporter: "She'll be heading back to Asia full of whatever it is we export".

That would be US Treasury Bonds, assuming China still wants them. Probably all fit in one container...make that all in one briefcase."

"Much of what goes out in those containers leaving our shores is raw materials: grain from our fields, logs from our forests, unprocessed mining and recycling spoils. The dirty work is done "over there" where labor is cheap and environmental controls negligible; the resulting products are then often shipped back to us again. Check it out; California redwood stakes at your local home improvement chain store, imported from China."
 
2012-03-23 01:06:55 PM  
Quite a few oil tankers are larger than 1200', same with the Maersk Emma... so this is definitely not the biggest. However, it's definitely a monster. I think the biggest ship in North America prior to this one must have been the Zim Djibouti at 1145'. But these things get huger:

T.M.S.: I recently visited a shipyard in Germany. It's kind of weird to enter a building and see a full sized cruise ship sitting in the water with the engines running. (they flood the factory to do power tests)

Then you move toward the center of the enormous room and see four full sized ships sitting there.

Your brain cannot grasp the scale.


I used to go sailing in a little boat around the Burrard inlet and would go up near the tankers sometimes, because they stay anchored in the inlet. You don't really grasp how big they are until you are right up next to them and then you have a moment of "Holy sh*t" because they literally are the size of a skyscraper placed on its side.

cache.virtualtourist.com

RoyBatty: Not expecting much from a container ship, but that is a truly ugly ship to sail the sea.


You know, it's weird, but to me they're not ugly at all. I think perhaps because I looked at them almost every day growing up. I think the MSC Fabiola is really lovely as container ships go.
 
2012-03-23 01:08:21 PM  
Bah 403 forbidden and all that.

BIG ships: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/22/Bateaux_comparaison 2.svg
 
2012-03-23 01:24:02 PM  
A crew of 21. Three shifts of seven? 7 days a week? How do they get insurance? You know there's no maintenance getting done.
 
2012-03-23 01:25:49 PM  

bobbette: Bah 403 forbidden and all that.

BIG ships: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Bateaux_comparaison2.svg (new window)


I was just about to post that, thanks to googiing Maersk Emma from your post.
 
2012-03-23 01:30:20 PM  

Silly Jesus: That's some awesome reporting.


"An aircraft carrier is 1000 ft., this ship is 1200 ft., so it's 200 ft. longer."
 
2012-03-23 02:17:48 PM  
"There she blows, as they say"

Except they don't, fool. That's a whaling term. You might be thinking of "Sail Ho!", but actually, more likely, you're thinking "I went to journalism school for this? I'm freezing in the Bay for a story that can be summed up as 'Hey, a big ship.'"
 
2012-03-23 02:57:00 PM  
HMS Fabio is fabulous!
 
2012-03-23 03:00:56 PM  
That's a big hunk of steel. Plus all the cargo.

By the by, you know that a ships rudders become LESS effective the slower she's moving, right?

The physics involved in muscling that giant metal biatch around are mind-boggling.
 
2012-03-23 03:10:49 PM  

scarmig: That's a lot of Happy Meal toys.


www.interestment.co.uk

To be fair, some of those cans are filled with dead Ukrainian sex slaves.
 
2012-03-23 03:11:57 PM  

dryknife: Newest San Fransisco phrase: Fabiola!


Newest? You've never actually been to San Francisco, have you.
 
2012-03-23 03:16:32 PM  

xaks: That's a big hunk of steel. Plus all the cargo.

By the by, you know that a ships rudders become LESS effective the slower she's moving, right?

The physics involved in muscling that giant metal biatch around are mind-boggling.


It's probably rudderless...Dutch or otherwise. It's all about thruster pods (new window) these days.
 
2012-03-23 03:16:34 PM  
stealthd
"There she blows, as they say"
Except they don't, fool. That's a whaling term. You might be thinking of "Sail Ho!", but actually, more likely, you're thinking "I went to journalism school for this? I'm freezing in the Bay for a story that can be summed up as 'Hey, a big ship.'"

if the person who went to journalism school wasn't a lazy fark they would research a bit or know from common knowledge msc is also a cruise line. they would pad the story a bit comparing the size of that ship with the size of a msc cruise ship, how many crew are on each ship, how much food a container ship can carry compared to how much the fatties eat on a cruise, etc... why are local newspapers dying? its because the lead story reads "the bank robber struggled with the police officer and he shot him with his gun".
 
2012-03-23 03:17:16 PM  
That's one big vessel. My uncle was a retired Chesapeake Bay pilot ( retired in the early 80's ), he made good money navigating ships up and down the Bay. It's a very nerve wracking job, due mostly to dealing with weather and language barrier. The pilots earn every penny as far as I see it. It's amazing to me to watch pleasure boats go so close to these behemoths, not realizing that pumps go on automatically at any time, not to mention the suction from the screws.
 
2012-03-23 03:18:30 PM  

Theaetetus: SpinStopper: pute kisses like a man: wow. is the bay difficult to navigate in such a big ship? or, do people always get pilots when they're close to land?

/ i'm only familiar with the way we do stuff on the mississippi. and those pilots make some very serious cash. but, the mississippi is apparently quite treacherous.

The video said they had three harbor pilots aboard the thing to handle the job ;)

What were they doing, steering by consensus?


I imagine they had one person at the stern, one at the bow, and one in the wheelhouse. The ones on either end were watching the water to make sure there wasn't all of a sudden a sandbar where it was clear a few days ago. Their job is to know every little change in the bay so they can bring in the big ships without running into a sandbar or any other underwater obstructions.
 
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