If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(The New York Times)   Katrina: the gift that keeps on giving   (nytimes.com) divider line 198
    More: Sad, Lower Ninth Ward, Scottish Highlands, Rottweilers, New Orleanians, gifts  
•       •       •

20179 clicks; posted to Main » on 23 Mar 2012 at 3:12 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



198 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-03-23 10:12:42 AM  
The critters are the only thing out there of any worth.

Worked the floods
helped some former pets find good homes

nothing else out there as far as I'm concerned.
 
2012-03-23 10:12:53 AM  

Splinshints: You could say the same thing about Vegas or most of Florida. Both of them exist in a relatively fragile state. One really bad drought could topple Vegas and Florida is often smacked by hurricanes and a substantial portion of it is a nasty, vermin-filled swamp to begin with.

But enough about Miami.

The point is that lots of areas all over the country teeter on the brink of disaster at any given moment. From towns like Joplin to regions like the area all around L.A. to entire states like Florida, it's not uncommon to have zones that are subject to disaster, but we keep them around anyway


Way to blow right by the point.

Vegas already has its own entirely manmade issues...and taking measures to conserve water is not going to trigger some other natural disaster, the way the levee system triggers coastal erosion and land dropping further below sea level. Regardless, a drought is not going to kill 1500 people in Vegas.

California builds with quakes in mind - that's why 35 people die when a bad one hits, instead of 35,000 when one hits in Iran. And again, quake preparedness does not set off secondary problems.

Miami does not have the business end of a gigantic flood-prone river running through it. Tornado Alley is not below sea level.

And so on. This is why I said New Orleans is in a uniquely bad spot.

Besides, it's not like it's impossible to find great food, great music, places to get drunk, convention halls and titty bars anywhere else in this country.
 
2012-03-23 10:13:38 AM  

Grand_Moff_Joseph: greenboy: haven't read the comments, but i'd like to point out the differences between N.O. after 7 years and the areas of japan hit by the tsunami after 1 year.

It just seems to me that in Japan, the residents themselves took to the streets to help clean up their area (with obvious help), but new orleans just waited for people to do it for them. The scope of the cleanup in japan is much larger, and at this point, much more complete than the 9th ward.

I'm aware that there is a huge poverty issue there, but something has to be said for taking responsibility for your home, your property and your neighborhood.

Fair point. but, keep in mind that a vast majority of the folks who lived in the L9 (and many other poorer parts of town) were renters. They did not owned the homes that were washed away, and most of the landlords skipped town and stuck the city with the cleanup bill. Louisiana property law is very ass-backwards, so simply claiming eminent domain as a conduit to sell the property is nearly impossible.


You know, I've wondered WTF about that for some time. I didn't give a moment's thought to the people who said "It's because George Bush hates black people" nor the folks who said "Black people are lazy" - the predominately black sections of the SC coast that were leveled by Hugo were rebuilt within a year or so, same with the 'black belt" of NC after Floyd and Fran. So I honestly wondered what the problem was.

But the information about the renters - makes sense to me.

Thanks for that tip. It's really the first explanation I've heard that fits.

/everyone else can go back to blaming George Bush and lazy black people
 
2012-03-23 10:22:48 AM  

violentsalvation: 8 pages. Give me a f*cking break.


ditto.
 
2012-03-23 10:22:51 AM  

Gulper Eel: California builds with quakes in mind - that's why 35 people die when a bad one hits, instead of 35,000 when one hits in Iran.


To be fair, it took a rather devastating earthquake/fire to teach us that lesson...
 
2012-03-23 10:23:38 AM  

hasty ambush: Those anybodies you are talking about doing the rebuilding, I hope, would be the people of NOLA. It seems to me there are lot of NOLA anybodies waiting for somebody to come in an do it for them. Certainly they cannot complain about a lack of funding.


If only somebody would post a link to an article which offered several reasonable suggestions as to the problem, possibly by using the Lower Ninth Ward and highlights from its recent history as guides.... perhaps it would even get greenlit and spawn a 150 comment thread.... then you could read this hypothetical article and understand some of the fundamental problems.

But enough sarcasm, I like the point Gulper Eel already made about the continued reticence of politicians and some "die hard" residents refusing to contract the city now that it has shrunk in population so significantly. They have the same problem that Detroit has. There is no reason an honest effort cannot be put forward to rebuild and clean up the city, it's just that nobody is willing to.

It's another example of where Americans insist on waffling back and forth and bickering about costs and tax dollars instead of just committing to a viable plan. I cannot even begin to imagine how great this country's infrastructure and cities could be if we just combined the resources of America with, say, the just-do-it attitude of Germany or Japan instead of doing everything so goddamn half-assed and in fits and starts because a bunch of buck-toothed inbreds in Arkansas are afraid their already bottom-rung tax bracket might go up a couple cents if we invest in some sensible upgrades and reconstruction.
 
2012-03-23 10:30:03 AM  
Splinshints: Seriously, Yanks, what the hell?

What everyone has danced around and not addressed is that this place is an area completely populated by poor blacks.
This presents, um, challenges to the urban planning process. Not only are a lot of the problems caused by a lack of economic means, (the dumping especially), a lot of the things that could be done in a regular community would never be able to take place here. A community garden? Only if you put armed guards on it. Volunteer work to clean the place up? Yeah, right. Incentives given to hipsters to move in? It would only increase the crime rate . You could pour billions of dollars into the infostructure of the place and at the end of the day you would still have to have armed guards in the grocery stores to stop theft.

What could be done as an immediate fix is to clean the place up using prison labor. Make a work camp down there in the center of the place and put them to work clearing and burning the place. Once the land is cleared then the people who hose the government to exploit the blacks will come up with a plan. Otherwise it will go on just like this for decades, until the population of New Orleans grows again. Who knows maybe a new wave of even poorer assed immigrants than the blacks will find the place.
 
2012-03-23 10:32:18 AM  

Gulper Eel: Way to blow right by the point.


No, the remainder of your post is my point. California invests substantially in earthquake monitoring, warning, and preparedness. There is plenty of investment in tornado alley for monitoring and preparedness. There is investment in Florida for monitoring and preparedness. These things didn't just naturally happen, there was substantial cost and effort associated with protecting these regions from threats we knew were inevitable, but that didn't happen in N.O. in any real way.

You can argue degrees here, or even that you don't care about the historical value of the area and the economics just don't play out, but I don't think that the situation in N.O. is substantially different enough to warrant a write-off any more than we should write-off a place like Joplin. There is no reason we cannot properly protect the city, we just didn't. The levees were inadequate, but they did not have to be. They were poorly built, flawed in their fundamental design, and in some cases weren't even finished.

A point which I connect back to my prior comment about Americans insisting on doing everything so half-assed. If we'd just stop wringing our hands and nervously hopping from foot to foot about everything and just did things and did them right the first time we probably wouldn't even be having this discussion because Katrina probably wouldn't have completely devastated the entire city.
 
2012-03-23 10:35:31 AM  

varmitydog: What everyone has danced around and not addressed is that this place is an area completely populated by poor blacks.
This presents, um, challenges to the urban planning process. Not only are a lot of the problems caused by a lack of economic means, (the dumping especially), a lot of the things that could be done in a regular community would never be able to take place here. A community garden? Only if you put armed guards on it. Volunteer work to clean the place up? Yeah, right. Incentives given to hipsters to move in? It would only increase the crime rate . You could pour billions of dollars into the infostructure of the place and at the end of the day you would still have to have armed guards in the grocery stores to stop theft.

What could be done as an immediate fix is to clean the place up using prison labor. Make a work camp down there in the center of the place and put them to work clearing and burning the place. Once the land is cleared then the people who hose the government to exploit the blacks will come up with a plan. Otherwise it will go on just like this for decades, until the population of New Orleans grows again. Who knows maybe a new wave of even poorer assed immigrants than the blacks will find the place.


You seem to have confused your casual racism, fundamental misunderstanding of community zones, and misplaced faith in the ability of the government to effectively exploit free labor with an intelligent point.

Perhaps you'd like to stop, think for a second this time, and try again?
 
2012-03-23 10:39:10 AM  

Splinshints: [i.dailymail.co.uk image 468x350]

Seriously, Yanks, what the hell?

Also, I love that it's an article about poor rebuilding and rehabilitation after a severe natural disaster and the comments here are full of lazy bastards who can't be bothered to move their index finger seven extra times to read the thoughtful, detailed article because it's not on a single page and that's just too much for them.

I guess the epic laziness of so many of the people in this thread is a good bookend to a story about how America can't be assed to rebuild New Orleans properly, though.

If you idiots can't even be bothered to lift and drop your index finger a few times to read about it, how should we expect anybody to actually go out and do the difficult work of cleanup and rebuilding?


Generalize much? Look up Make It Right Foundation.
 
2012-03-23 10:42:26 AM  

Splinshints: California invests substantially in earthquake monitoring, warning, and preparedness. There is plenty of investment in tornado alley for monitoring and preparedness. There is investment in Florida for monitoring and preparedness. These things didn't just naturally happen, there was substantial cost and effort associated with protecting these regions from threats we knew were inevitable, but that didn't happen in N.O. in any real way.


True, but the difference remains - in New Orleans, a completely floodproofed Mississippi would only invite the Gulf in that much more quickly. The region depends on regular flooding of the river...which is why settlers in days gone by farmed that land instead of building thousands of crappy houses on it.

Analogy: Quakeproofing buildings in California is not going to cause volcanoes to erupt, and stormproofing Florida isn't going to leave it four feet below sea level and sinking.
 
2012-03-23 10:43:42 AM  
That's how L9 had been before the levees gave people a false sense of security. We shouldn't encourage development in that area...
 
2012-03-23 10:47:47 AM  

Confabulat: bunner: Confabulat: Ok, so let's just close up the Port of New Orleans as you suggest

[transitionculture.org image 333x500]

How am I strawmanning? You argue we need to abandon New Orleans to the swamps, because that makes more economic sense than trying to keep it together. I'm arguing the very obvious point otherwise.

So what am I strawmanning?


The whole port thing. Not to mention the whole "mouth of the Mississippi" thing. No one was suggesting either, they were suggesting the portions of the locale below sea level should be abandoned. Because not all of New Orleans is sitting in the bowl.

Perhaps we should stop forcing the Mississippi on its current course, let it alter to the one it prefers, and build a nice shiny new port city there.
 
2012-03-23 10:57:43 AM  

Confabulat: fireside68: We don't need you. You need us. THAT'S why people give a shiat.

Oh look. someone else who doesn't understand the concept of shipping and ports. No, you need New Orleans more than it needs you, I can pretty much promise you, if you like to buy goods from places other than your local baker.


But I could do without it's large indigent population and corrupt local government.
 
2012-03-23 11:11:43 AM  

Splinshints: [i.dailymail.co.uk image 468x350]

Seriously, Yanks, what the hell?

Also, I love that it's an article about poor rebuilding and rehabilitation after a severe natural disaster and the comments here are full of lazy bastards who can't be bothered to move their index finger seven extra times to read the thoughtful, detailed article because it's not on a single page and that's just too much for them.

I guess the epic laziness of so many of the people in this thread is a good bookend to a story about how America can't be assed to rebuild New Orleans properly, though.

If you idiots can't even be bothered to lift and drop your index finger a few times to read about it, how should we expect anybody to actually go out and do the difficult work of cleanup and rebuilding?


As someone who spent 11 months rebuilding on the Gulf Coast after Katrina, I humbly submit the only suggestion that could work there:
www.primelocationblog.com

The problem: flood plain, fertile soil, forest wants to grow there... the problem IS the solution.

/hot, like the Gulf Coast in July
 
2012-03-23 11:17:21 AM  

This text is now purple: bgflores: Katrina wasn't a natural disaster; it was a man-made catastrophe. Let's thank the Army Corps of Engineers for the twin failures of their levee system and the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet. I'm just thankful that the storm weakened from its max strength before it hit the city. Had it hit the city at full strength, I don't think there'd be a city to rebuild, and I think the death toll would have been much higher than 1800.

The ACE is the only reason there's still a NO at all. Without them, the river would have shifted, and Morgan City would be the new NO.

The Mississippi outlet port will be wherever the river happens to exit, or the nearest accessible dry piece of land. That place need not be New Orleans.


The ACE is also the reason the levees at the 17th Street Canal failed under the onslaught of a storm they were theoretically supposed to be able to resist, and they've been found liable by a US District Court in a lawsuit over their negligence in maintaining the MRGO. That argument's a bit like saying that PG&E is the only reason California had power, despite the toxic materials they were dumping in people's drinking water.
 
2012-03-23 11:19:02 AM  
Good job there, Brownie.
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-03-23 11:19:07 AM  

Splinshints: I guess the epic laziness of so many of the people in this thread is a good bookend to a story about how America can't be assed to rebuild New Orleans properly, though.

If you idiots can't even be bothered to lift and drop your index finger a few times to read about it, how should we expect anybody to actually go out and do the difficult work of cleanup and rebuilding?


Not all of New Orleans needs to be rebuilt. People WANT all of it rebuilt, but that's because people are farking stupid.
 
2012-03-23 11:21:04 AM  
I didn't click either. I am also tired of articles that go on for many pages. 8 is too goddam many. The NYT is particularly bad about it, and they also have the 20 articles a month limit.

So, pass. If you don't like it ... whatever. I don't care.
 
2012-03-23 11:25:55 AM  

Snargi: violentsalvation: 8 pages. Give me a f*cking break.

[files.dixielandgumbo.com image 454x340]


Sorry, didn't mean to steal your sunshine.

/but, mine does have more arrows. Think about it.
 
2012-03-23 11:27:28 AM  
There was a factory
Now there are mountains and rivers
you got it, you got it

We caught a rattlesnake
Now we got something for dinner
we got it, we got it

There was a shopping mall
Now it's all covered with flowers
you've got it, you've got it

If this is paradise
I wish I had a lawnmower
you've got it, you've got it
 
2012-03-23 11:30:13 AM  

IwasKloot: Snargi: violentsalvation: 8 pages. Give me a f*cking break.

[files.dixielandgumbo.com image 454x340]

Sorry, didn't mean to steal your sunshine.

/but, mine does have more arrows. Think about it.


The arrows were pretty.
 
2012-03-23 11:30:32 AM  
Landrieu, elected in 2010, has directed considerable amounts of federal and local financing to construction projects in the Lower Ninth. These include $60 million for street repairs, $50 million for rebuilding schools and $14.5 million for a new community center. But clearing the lots is the logical first step. How can you repair a street if you can't see it?

According to the recent census, 5,560 people now live in the area,


124.5 million dollars for fifty-five hundred people? I'm sure they could move somewhere nicer for $22,400 EACH!
 
2012-03-23 11:41:45 AM  
Ninth Ward Hunters
Chawahh coochie malee don't bow down
make no humbah
 
2012-03-23 11:52:49 AM  
People have moved from flood-prone areas before. An entire town in Illinois did it about 4 years ago. It isn't abandoning the entire city to acknowledge that some parts of it are incompatible with human habitation.

That New Orleans is a major port is irrelevant to the argument over whether people should move back to the Ninth Ward. Nobody rational is suggesting New Orleans in its entirety should be bulldozed or abandoned. They're saying the worst-flooded areas should probably not be rebuilt so that people can move back there and live in the most flood-imperiled place in America.
 
2012-03-23 12:01:13 PM  
With all of these home improvement and home building shows on television; I would love to see something like a 9th ward reclamation show.
 
2012-03-23 12:14:22 PM  

Splinshints: I cannot even begin to imagine how great this country's infrastructure and cities could be if we just combined the resources of America with, say, the just-do-it attitude of Germany or Japan instead of doing everything so goddamn half-assed and in fits and starts because a bunch of buck-toothed inbreds in Arkansas are afraid their already bottom-rung tax bracket might go up a couple cents if we invest in some sensible upgrades and reconstruction.


Both Germany and Japan have their share of ghost towns and failed industrial developments.

And that just-do-it attitude makes the occasional atrocity all the easier.
 
2012-03-23 12:17:30 PM  
Most of New Orleans' problems can be solved within a couple of generations with one simple law:

Every tourist who visits NOLA is required to bring one suitcase full of soil or rocks with them, empty it out, and use the empty case for buying pralines, Cafe Du Monde coffee and beignet mix and other souvenirs. The soil and rocks will, given time, elevate the city above sea level.
 
2012-03-23 12:34:18 PM  

Honest Bender: MadAzza: don't want to "pay" for anything, in any way.

There's no shame in admitting a conversation is over your head. Just try and do it with a little more grace and tact next time. Now go play quietly; Adults are talking.


How sweet of you to share your self-reflection with the rest of us. I hope you take your advice.
 
2012-03-23 12:36:41 PM  

unyon: Good article, worth the read.

It surprises me that land that is so amazingly fertile hasn't seen any agricultural use, even temporarily. They would be doing the community a greater service by knocking down and clearing derelict houses and foundations, so at least that's a possibility.

It also surprises me that overgrowth control via herbicide hasn't happened.


Yeah.....I don't get this. It says they have a tractor. To get rid of the more herbaceous growth, just bush hog it, with a few guys with trimmers, not ten. For the heavier woody growth, one word; ROUNDUP™. This isn't that complicated, and it would be cheaper than what they're doing now, unless their goal is just to give the twelve people jobs. If that's all it is, I'm outta here......
 
2012-03-23 12:39:00 PM  

Splinshints: You can argue degrees here, or even that you don't care about the historical value of the area and the economics just don't play out, but I don't think that the situation in N.O. is substantially different enough to warrant a write-off any more than we should write-off a place like Joplin.


Joplin drains. The Mississippi wants to drain *into* the northern section of New Orleans.

Picture Rotterdam. Similarly a major port city built largely below sea level and protected by an immense levee system, with an important river running through it.

Now increase the Rhine's discharge rate by a factor of 8.

Now add a large, tidal lake on the side of the city opposite the river.

Now add exposure to storm surges 8ft higher than the North Sea can generate, with the knowledge that because of Pontchartrain, they can come at New Orleans from three sides.

Now note that while Rotterdam is built on the northern edge of the Reine/Mause delta, New Orleans is built in the middle of the Mississippi delta.

Perhaps you see the challenge. New Orleans' location is substantially more dangerous than Rotterdam's, and Rotterdam has gone through a series of devastating, high fatality floods.
 
2012-03-23 12:44:42 PM  

Confabulat: bunner: I'll miss them but I can't see a reason on earth to piss one more nickel of our precious debt notes into the swamps they are destined to become.

You do realize the entire existence of New Orleans is because of its geographic location at the mouth of the Mississippi River, one of the most important ports in the USA. That is not going to change anytime soon.

You think we can afford to let a swamp sit at the mouth of our most important Eastern port? Really? You think that will happen or is wise?


The point is, the river that runs there is no longer the mouth of the Mississippi. The U.S. Congress (through the Corps of Engineers) have attempted to make it so by fiat. It has failed, because we are not able to reverse the decrees of Mother Nature. If you want to know the trouble, quit gazing at the symptoms and go to the root. This forum is inappropriate for such a discussion, so Google an article that John McPhee wrote for the New Yorker entitled Atchafalaya. Once I read that, I understood.
 
2012-03-23 12:58:28 PM  

Gulper Eel: True, but the difference remains - in New Orleans, a completely floodproofed Mississippi would only invite the Gulf in that much more quickly. The region depends on regular flooding of the river...which is why settlers in days gone by farmed that land instead of building thousands of crappy houses on it.

Analogy: Quakeproofing buildings in California is not going to cause volcanoes to erupt, and stormproofing Florida isn't going to leave it four feet below sea level and sinking.


Which is why I think you're on the right track with shrinking it down to a manageable size more appropriate for its remaining population, but the notion that it should just be abandoned to rot into wilderness, like so many people here are saying, is still, in my book, absurd.

Ayn Rand's Social Worker: I humbly submit the only suggestion that could work there:


New Orleans has been one of the country's largest cities for almost as long as the country has had cities (even after Katrina it's still in the top 50), so I think your claim that keeping it a valid city is unreasonably difficult is highly suspect. And, again, I'd like to point out that in my prior posts I've advocated for the condensing of the city rather than blanket rebuilding from the center out. I know some people are saying that the the entire thing should just be reconstructed as it stood before the storm, but I'm not one of them, so be sure to factor that into any response.

This text is now purple: Perhaps you see the challenge. New Orleans' location is substantially more dangerous than Rotterdam's, and Rotterdam has gone through a series of devastating, high fatality floods.


Yet, again, the city stood through well over 150 years of storms and flooding before a complete catastrophe, and the main reason it was a complete catastrophe was because the levees were built in a completely haphazard and half-assed way right from the design stage.

Again, using your logic, people shouldn't be allowed to live on any coastline or in most of California, Oregon and Washington. It's really only a matter of time until a catastrophic earthquake or tsunami devastates the region, so let's just throw in the towel and let them all rot, right? Same goes for much of the southeastern U.S. and the eastern portion of Texas. Hell, even through much of the D.C. to Boston corridor there's a serious threat of a catastrophic tsunami at some point in the future. It's really only a matter of WHEN an enormous hurricane or tsunami hits them, not IF, so better just abandon them because it's "difficult" (though, like New Orleans, nowhere near impossible) to properly protect those regions.

There's no reason New Orleans, as a city, can't be maintained. Individuals who choose to live there will always be at a significant risk, but the city itself, as a whole, can certainly be protected within reasonable parameters.
 
2012-03-23 01:14:56 PM  

Confabulat: fireside68: We don't need you. You need us. THAT'S why people give a shiat.

Oh look. someone else who doesn't understand the concept of shipping and ports. No, you need New Orleans more than it needs you, I can pretty much promise you, if you like to buy goods from places other than your local baker.


Did you bother to look at my profile to see from where I am posting?
 
2012-03-23 01:19:30 PM  

fireclown: fireside68: We don't need you. You need us. THAT'S why people give a shiat.

a little more than half of the US export grain crop passes through the port of New Orleans. An assload of oil comes into the US through the gulf, which means the port of New Orleans. We need them too. Plus, there is my basic tendancy to minimize avoidable suffering.


I know. Try a daytime drive down Tchoupitoulas sometime. Three guesses who "we" in my statement is.
 
2012-03-23 01:31:25 PM  

violentsalvation: 8 pages. Give me a f*cking break.


cdn.svcs.c2.uclick.com
 
2012-03-23 01:45:08 PM  

Sid_6.7: violentsalvation: 8 pages. Give me a f*cking break.

It's a magazine article. That's the format. F*cking deal.


Eh, bullshiat. They do it for click counts, nothing more. I bailed after I saw the 1-8 on the bottom of page 1. Not playin' that game.
 
2012-03-23 02:44:35 PM  
Was anyone else amused that the New York Times decided to title an article about New Orleans Jungleland. I'm sure it had nothing to do with the chocolateosity or the fact that it is chock full o' jungle bunnies.

www.comicartcollective.com
 
2012-03-23 03:06:41 PM  

Loucifer: "I saw a possum in the backyard the other day," Terrence said. "Its teeth were about this big. I killed it with a stick. It was coming toward me, so I hit him. He just flipped over. I stayed inside after that."

[i3.photobucket.com image 310x310]


Thank god I wasn't the only one to spot that comment...
 
2012-03-23 04:50:47 PM  

sleeps in trees: That aside it is your farking country. You care for your own. Is it always us against them? What the fark is wrong with you?


Cultural introspection is indeed a sign of an enlightened nation, but still... the only question we should ask ourselves about New Orleans is whether it should be nuked from orbit, or merely bulldozed.
 
2012-03-23 04:57:47 PM  

Sid_6.7: violentsalvation: 8 pages. Give me a f*cking break.

It's a magazine article. That's the format. F*cking deal.


i910.photobucket.com
 
2012-03-23 04:59:34 PM  

Man On Pink Corner: sleeps in trees: That aside it is your farking country. You care for your own. Is it always us against them? What the fark is wrong with you?

Cultural introspection is indeed a sign of an enlightened nation, but still... the only question we should ask ourselves about New Orleans is whether it should be nuked from orbit, or merely bulldozed.


Aw, no need to go to all that expense. Time and nature will take care of it.

In a few centuries some archeologists will dig it up and wonder why we built a city in a swamp, especially since we had the example of El Mirador to warn us about that.
 
2012-03-23 08:46:58 PM  
I enjoy seeing pictures that illustrate the impermanance of modern society... Overgrowth FTW
 
2012-03-23 09:06:01 PM  

farkingbubbler: Sim Tree: Confabulat: violentsalvation: I would have loved to read it and not clicked through what is nearly a slide show

So, tell me why clicking your left mouse button upsets you so much. Clearly this is a very traumatic thing for you. Explain in detail, your fury and obvious preference to ignore quality journalism because it requires your index finger to move a fraction of an inch.

encourages the wrong behavior.

It's easy to get spastic articles that ( next page)

add tons of meaningless (next page)

page transitions in a transparent attempt to ( next page)

artificially increase their page count (next page)

making them difficult to read (next page)

And frustrating to deal with (next page)

similar to those pages that reload themselves before you can finish the article.

Annnd... before you know it, you've reached your 20 pages (soon to be ten) that NYT, JSOnline, etc. allow before the pay wall kicks in.


Plenty of ways around paywalls. Do a little research.
 
2012-03-23 11:47:45 PM  

Bunnyhat: I have a hard time feeling sorry for the people who insist on moving back to the areas like the lower 9th ward.
There is no reason for it.
It's pure stubbornness


I'm curious... could ALL of them afford to go anywhere else?
 
2012-03-24 01:00:20 AM  

violentsalvation: 8 pages. Give me a f*cking break.


THIS X1000000
 
2012-03-24 01:08:36 AM  

CheapEngineer: Snargi: violentsalvation: 8 pages. Give me a f*cking break.

[files.dixielandgumbo.com image 454x340]

oooOOO, there *was* one.

\sneaky bastards
\\still manually paged thru all 8, cause it was a good article
\\\but would have read all at once if i'd seen the tiny f'ing link


THIS, as well. now maybe i will read it.
 
2012-03-24 05:53:03 PM  

fireside68: DrPainMD: Grand_Moff_Joseph: Yeah, scuttle those wealthy, mostly white tourists back to their comfy hotel in the quarter, then probably run them in to the Hard Rock for a "real New Orleans vibe!". God forbid they actually see a real person who is still trying to survive in the L9 - they might have to stop taking pictures and actually think critically for a damn minute.

Sure, maybe the kid just wanted money to buy a video game. But chances are, he was looking for money to buy some damn food or clothing, or since there's barely any stores in the area now, likely for bus fare to get to the store at all. The least they could have done was buy a damn praline from him.

As a NOLA native, maybe I'm being bitter. Well, yeah, I am, at least a little. Look, I know the tours = paychecks for the guides and drivers and such, and that's good for them. But frankly, those geriatrics can take their guided disaster tour brochures and shove them, and take the bus right back to Moysan airport.

I was just wondering why America doesn't give a Fark about New Orleans. Thanks for the reminder.

We don't need you. You need us. THAT'S why people give a shiat.


Uhmmm . . . who is "us" ?
 
Displayed 48 of 198 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report