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(Some Scientician)   "It's sort of like the way a Russian Sauna works, but instead of hot coals there's a nuclear explosion, instead of steam there's X-rays, and instead of a hut it's a Frigidaire, and also Indiana Jones is dead." Science   (overthinkingit.com) divider line 77
    More: Cool  
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6611 clicks; posted to Geek » on 18 Mar 2012 at 3:41 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-03-18 01:10:56 PM
Why did you drop me into the middle of an article that made no sense?
 
2012-03-18 01:22:20 PM
FFS
 
2012-03-18 01:40:16 PM
troll.me
 
2012-03-18 01:44:25 PM
They overlook an obvious explanation for Indy's miraculous survival. It was a miracle. He did drink from the holy grail, after all, thereby becoming immortal.
 
2012-03-18 02:01:49 PM
Subby, your blog sucks.

/my brain hurts.
 
2012-03-18 02:12:33 PM
I haven't seen the movie, but I know Lucas is heavily influenced by old pulp fiction stories. These type of stories include things like people living on Mars and astronauts walking around the moon without helmets simply because we didn't know better at the time, scientifically speaking. Is there chance that Indy surviving the bomb falls under this category, considering the year the movie is supposed to take place?
 
2012-03-18 03:24:32 PM
Indy drank from the holy grail. A nuclear blast won't do shiat to him. The only reason he climbed in the fridge was to protect his clothes and himself from radiation so he wouldn't need to be buried in a lead lined tomb underneath 100 feet of concrete.
 
2012-03-18 03:38:36 PM
You spent time analyzing Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull.

Your argument does not belong in a museum.
 
2012-03-18 03:46:53 PM
Banya. Sauna is Finnish. You don't hear anybody saying Russian taco salsa sauce now do you?
 
2012-03-18 04:00:53 PM
The argument assumes that the fridge has a mass of a mere 71kg. I could work out the math for various thicknesses of lead lining and so on, but if you've ever worn a lead vest at the dentist, you can imagine that a fridge with a more solid lining might be just a tad heavier.

Everything in the article seems to hinge on that point, so the argument is invalid. The "It kind of sucked" argument still works, though.
 
2012-03-18 04:06:01 PM

Roook: Indy drank from the holy grail. A nuclear blast won't do shiat to him. The only reason he climbed in the fridge was to protect his clothes and himself from radiation so he wouldn't need to be buried in a lead lined tomb underneath 100 feet of concrete.


IIRC, he lost the immortality that the Grail gave him once he crossed the Great Seal.
 
2012-03-18 04:12:32 PM

Bathia_Mapes: Roook: Indy drank from the holy grail. A nuclear blast won't do shiat to him. The only reason he climbed in the fridge was to protect his clothes and himself from radiation so he wouldn't need to be buried in a lead lined tomb underneath 100 feet of concrete.

IIRC, he lost the immortality that the Grail gave him once he crossed the Great Seal.


Precisely that.

Quoth the knight: "You have chosen... wisely... but the Grail cannot pass beyond the Great Seal. That is the boundary, and the price of immortality."
 
2012-03-18 04:19:22 PM

rosonowski: The argument assumes that the fridge has a mass of a mere 71kg. I could work out the math for various thicknesses of lead lining and so on, but if you've ever worn a lead vest at the dentist, you can imagine that a fridge with a more solid lining might be just a tad heavier.

Everything in the article seems to hinge on that point, so the argument is invalid. The "It kind of sucked" argument still works, though.


Actually, very little hinges on that. The accelerations Indy underwent would be independent of the mass of the fridge.

Also, Indy is only immortal if he doesn't pass the great seal. He did, so he isn't.
 
2012-03-18 04:23:11 PM
An unreadable article about an unwatchable movie. Thanks.
 
2012-03-18 04:25:50 PM
Thanks for reminding me about the 4th Indiana Jones movie, spent a lot of time trying to forget.
 
2012-03-18 04:40:59 PM
www.blogcdn.com
 
2012-03-18 04:41:27 PM

DeltaPunch: Is there chance that Indy surviving the bomb falls under this category, considering the year the movie is supposed to take place?


Not really. Even if we ignore the radiation and the intense heat, the simple acceleration shown in the film would liquify everything in the fridge.

rosonowski: The argument assumes that the fridge has a mass of a mere 71kg.


You could double the mass of the fridge, heck, multiply it by a factor of 10, and you're basically going to get the same result. For stuff like impulse, it's just going to make things worse for Indy.

Nuking the fridge was a stupid idea for a stupid set piece in the middle of a fairly stupid movie.
 
2012-03-18 04:49:36 PM
Rule of Cool: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/RuleOfCool

Most of Who Framed Roger Rabbit is insane. The Gun Kata in Equilibrium is ridiculous. That stuff in The Matrix about "with a form of fusion" is complete tosh. The raft landing in Temple of Doom is probably impossible. The opening of Star Wars has a silly "hold your fire" moment that makes no sense. What, the empire can't afford an extra blast shot (and no, don't give me none of your Extended Universe explanations).

What separates those from Indy IV is that they were all cool. If you're having a good time, you'll gloss over stupid shiat. You will suspend disbelief. In the case of Roger Rabbit pulling his hand from handcuffs "only when it was funny", you laugh your ass off at how deliberately ridiculous it is. It's only when you're not having a good time that you start analysing a movie.
 
db2
2012-03-18 04:57:11 PM
Am I seriously the only person that enjoyed the movie?
 
2012-03-18 05:02:04 PM

db2: Am I seriously the only person that enjoyed the movie?


Seems that way.

Now, can we please stop talking about it? The Indy series ended with Grail. End of story.
 
2012-03-18 05:02:05 PM

db2: Am I seriously the only person that enjoyed the movie?


It's pretty hilarious with the RiffTrax, if that counts.
 
2012-03-18 05:03:30 PM
The scene is ridiculous, but so is the breakdown. Most of the author's assumptions are shown false from the very video linked to at the beginning. Examples being the fridge being moved vertically to fly over the car when the video shows the road the car was driving dipping down just as the fridge passed it, the bomb being shown a goodly distance greater than 0.6KM from the town, the mannequins bursting into flames from thermal radiation, not the air being heated to that temperature, etc...

The approach could've been a fun skewering of Luca's stupidity with the fridge nuking, but the article fails almost as badly.

t3knomanser: Not really. Even if we ignore the radiation and the intense heat, the simple acceleration shown in the film would liquify everything in the fridge.


I wonder about that...the acceleration isn't near instantaneous from the shockwave (was the author referencing static overpressure?), but shown to be a result of the blast winds. Throw something up into the wind on a windy day and it isn't immediately accelerated to the velocity of the wind, but experiences something much, much more gradual. Constant force over several seconds vs fraction of a second impulse. (Anecdotally, I've been picked up and thrown by a strong wind gust and it didn't snap my neck or liquefy me from the acceleration.) Can't really judge just from watching the mock town get blasted for, when it comes to strong wind, it doesn't take a whole lot to tear a house apart.

The fridge hitting the ground may very well have been a greater force.
 
2012-03-18 05:21:16 PM
I looked and looked and never could get a bite into it.
 
2012-03-18 05:29:44 PM
Oh, another article about 'nuking the fridge'? Excuse me while I melt my face like a nazi and then tear the still beating heart out of a man's chest. Because those are both so farking plausible.

/KALI MA
 
2012-03-18 05:49:28 PM

Diogenes Teufelsdrockh: the acceleration isn't near instantaneous from the shockwave


The fridge goes from "at rest" across a sizable distance in a certain period of time. It's shown outrunning motor vehicles. The total acceleration required to get there requires a massive impulse.

tankjr: Excuse me while I melt my face like a nazi and then tear the still beating heart out of a man's chest. Because those are both so farking plausible.


Both of them were vastly more plausible. It has been established that magic exists in the Indy universe. It has also been established that the laws of physics are more or less the same, excepting magic (the parachuting raft was a terrible scene, but not nearly as egregious as nuking the fridge; similarly, the cutting the bridge scene was also pretty bad). Nuclear bombs and lead-lined fridges are not magic.
 
2012-03-18 06:01:32 PM
Schrödinger's archaeologist?
 
2012-03-18 06:02:01 PM
Just let it go already.
 
2012-03-18 06:06:21 PM

Toshiro Mifune's Letter Opener: Bathia_Mapes: Roook: Indy drank from the holy grail. A nuclear blast won't do shiat to him. The only reason he climbed in the fridge was to protect his clothes and himself from radiation so he wouldn't need to be buried in a lead lined tomb underneath 100 feet of concrete.

IIRC, he lost the immortality that the Grail gave him once he crossed the Great Seal.

Precisely that.

Quoth the knight: "You have chosen... wisely... but the Grail cannot pass beyond the Great Seal. That is the boundary, and the price of immortality."


I haven't watched the movie in a while, but wasn't the Great Seal destroyed when the floor collapsed? Did it mark the edge of the boundary or was it the boundary itself?
 
2012-03-18 06:12:49 PM

ignatzbrickbat: I haven't watched the movie in a while, but wasn't the Great Seal destroyed when the floor collapsed? Did it mark the edge of the boundary or was it the boundary itself?


Good question.

I assumed that it marked the edge of the boundary.

Failing that, I go to my standby explanation of difficult-to-answer questions in movies: "A wizard did it."
 
2012-03-18 06:23:59 PM

t3knomanser: Diogenes Teufelsdrockh: the acceleration isn't near instantaneous from the shockwave

The fridge goes from "at rest" across a sizable distance in a certain period of time. It's shown outrunning motor vehicles. The total acceleration required to get there requires a massive impulse.


The fridge is shown outrunning a motor vehicle, several seconds after the blast struck the town, perhaps having received constant force from blast winds the entire time. Acceleration over several seconds to motor vehicle speeds doesn't liquefy a body quite like it does if the same final velocity is achieved in a millisecond. If it did, drag races would be much more interesting to watch. Doesn't matter if it started at rest, it achieved the final velocity over the long distance you just mentioned. Not a short distance. Said motor vehicle is a '50s era Studebaker driving on a dirt road. Nuke or not, that car isn't going to achieve the same top speed as it would on asphalt regardless of what the driver may wish. Top speed achieved is likely to be half of what the article writer figured on (~40MPH instead of 80MPH -- I've been to 80 on a smoother gravel road in a much newer vehicle [truck] with much improved suspension and I was nowhere near as in control of it as the Commies were of that half century older vehicle).

Frankly, the bolded part makes my point. It was acceleration over a sizable distance. The fridge wasn't punted, it was more likely picked up and carried on the blast winds, which happened to be milder where the fridge was suspended than what followed and destroyed the car.

After some windstorms, I have found lawn chairs in my yard from a house half a mile down the hill, I'd think you agree that the better conclusion to draw is that the wind carried them rather than that there was a nuclear detonation downtown launching the chairs the distance in one brief impulse of acceleration.

Nukes do their structural damage from overpressure and wind, not a shockwave that shatters almost everything in an instant and kicks the rest into parabolic trajectories.

/Nuking the fridge is still stupid, but not quite as much as swinging on vines with monkey allies.
 
2012-03-18 06:30:11 PM
Okay, assume a spherical fridge in a vacuum.
 
2012-03-18 06:42:14 PM

Toshiro Mifune's Letter Opener: Bathia_Mapes: Roook: Indy drank from the holy grail. A nuclear blast won't do shiat to him. The only reason he climbed in the fridge was to protect his clothes and himself from radiation so he wouldn't need to be buried in a lead lined tomb underneath 100 feet of concrete.

IIRC, he lost the immortality that the Grail gave him once he crossed the Great Seal.

Precisely that.

Quoth the knight: "You have chosen... wisely... but the Grail cannot pass beyond the Great Seal. That is the boundary, and the price of immortality."


He didn't "lose immortality". The grail did not give permanent immortality, it simply extended your life. You had to keep drinking from it to stay alive forever. Since it couldn't cross the seal you had to stay there to keep using it. It is plausible that he still had some benefit of it later on.
 
2012-03-18 06:45:35 PM

db2: Am I seriously the only person that enjoyed the movie?


I did as well - I mean, I wasn't expecting Citizen Kane Returns

/Re the article: 2008 called and, well, something
 
2012-03-18 06:51:12 PM
Diogenes Teufelsdrockh, are you actually using "the fridge flew very far in a small amount of time" as an argument for Indy being ok? That's... backwards.
 
2012-03-18 06:51:20 PM
The only thing worse than that movie are the assholes who take potshots at it years after it came out. We get it, it sucked. Let it go.
 
2012-03-18 07:02:50 PM

Thudfark: Banya. Sauna is Finnish.


Once you're in the towel and had a few hits of vodak, are you really gonna care if the hot blonde whacking at you with a bundle of twigs is named Liisa or Ludmila?
 
2012-03-18 07:03:15 PM

SharkTrager: Toshiro Mifune's Letter Opener: Bathia_Mapes: Roook: Indy drank from the holy grail. A nuclear blast won't do shiat to him. The only reason he climbed in the fridge was to protect his clothes and himself from radiation so he wouldn't need to be buried in a lead lined tomb underneath 100 feet of concrete.

IIRC, he lost the immortality that the Grail gave him once he crossed the Great Seal.

Precisely that.

Quoth the knight: "You have chosen... wisely... but the Grail cannot pass beyond the Great Seal. That is the boundary, and the price of immortality."

He didn't "lose immortality". The grail did not give permanent immortality, it simply extended your life. You had to keep drinking from it to stay alive forever. Since it couldn't cross the seal you had to stay there to keep using it. It is plausible that he still had some benefit of it later on.


WHY couldn't it cross the Seal? It obviously crossed it when they brought it in to the cave. After all, the whole story of Jesus didn't occur in a cave (so to speak).
 
2012-03-18 07:03:43 PM

Diogenes Teufelsdrockh: The fridge is shown outrunning a motor vehicle, several seconds after the blast struck the town, perhaps having received constant force from blast winds the entire time.


FTFA: Dr. Frigidaire has undergone a net change in momentum (mass*Δvelocity) with a minimal magnitude of (170 kg)*(38.32 m/s) = 6514.4 kg•m/s. Physicists term this quantity the "Impulse," roughly thought of as the force imparted to a body multiplied by the time spent imparting it: I = F•Δt. Therefore, if we knew how long it took to accelerate the 'fridge, we could calculate the force imparted to it.

Now, the bombs deployed at Hiroshima and Nagasaki prouced blast winds approaching 620 mph (= 277 m/s) as far as one mile from their detonation centers. A comparably powered blast would overtake Dr. Jones' refrigerator (depth = 0.7 m) in 0.7 (m)/277 (m/s) = 2.5 millisconds. This means that the force exerted on him-the impulse divided by the time-would be a whopping 6514.4 (kg•m/s)/0.0025 (s) = 2,605,760 Newtons.


The blast winds are an incredibly dense shockwave. The entirety of their force is expended in a very short period of time- that's kinda the point of a bomb. The longer duration winds you're thinking of from films of nuclear blasts are not heading away from the blast site- they're heading towards it- the bomb's blast wave leaves behind it a volume of rarified air. So if Indy were flying towards the center of the bomb blast, you might have something.
 
2012-03-18 07:05:39 PM
Headline = excellent description of subby's mom's vagina.
 
2012-03-18 07:06:01 PM
Why the fark can't people just enjoy a farking movie, it's fiction not a documentary!
 
2012-03-18 07:12:59 PM

dababler: Why the fark can't people just enjoy a farking movie, it's fiction not a documentary!


Because it's more proof that everything that George Lucas has touched after 1989 (Last Crusade, while not as great as Raiders, was still pretty good) has turned to crap.
 
2012-03-18 07:22:58 PM

dababler: Why the fark can't people just enjoy a farking movie, it's fiction not a documentary!


Discussing the ridiculous physics is pretty much the only enjoyment to be had in the film.
 
2012-03-18 07:25:37 PM
Raiders of the Lost Ark - Indy survives multiple things that would kill a normal person, not the least of which being strapped to a Submarine for a long time. At the end God kills everyone that looked at the Ark.

Temple of Doom - Not only surviving tons of things with the crazy Kali people, there's the whole thing with falling out of the plane with the raft.

Last Crusade - Again, a ton of ways Indy should have been seriously injured, but survived with no problems.

Crystal Skull is consistent with a franchise that is batshiat insane. It's also a franchise where impossible religious artifacts are just strewn around for the Nazis to find, and this was a movie regarding aliens from another dimension.
 
2012-03-18 07:37:33 PM

snarky kong: Diogenes Teufelsdrockh, are you actually using "the fridge flew very far in a small amount of time" as an argument for Indy being ok? That's... backwards.


No, I'm not. I've repeatedly said the whole nuking the fridge thing is idiotic. I'm arguing that the article's author is making a false assumption of very high acceleration on top of several other false assumptions that are countered in the very video he linked to. What I have said is that there appeared to be a force exerted on the fridge over a great distance and several seconds vs one quick punt launching the fridge over the goalposts that the author assumes.

It's a movie, a work of fiction and not really worth the attention. It tried to entertain, failed and is now in the past. However, once the author of the article set out to do a scientific, peer reviewed type dissection based on the premise that his science is correct when the rest isn't, he opened himself up to the same.

t3knomanser: Diogenes Teufelsdrockh: The fridge is shown outrunning a motor vehicle, several seconds after the blast struck the town, perhaps having received constant force from blast winds the entire time.

FTFA: Dr. Frigidaire has undergone a net change in momentum (mass*Δvelocity) with a minimal magnitude of (170 kg)*(38.32 m/s) = 6514.4 kg•m/s. Physicists term this quantity the "Impulse," roughly thought of as the force imparted to a body multiplied by the time spent imparting it: I = F•Δt. Therefore, if we knew how long it took to accelerate the 'fridge, we could calculate the force imparted to it.

Now, the bombs deployed at Hiroshima and Nagasaki prouced blast winds approaching 620 mph (= 277 m/s) as far as one mile from their detonation centers. A comparably powered blast would overtake Dr. Jones' refrigerator (depth = 0.7 m) in 0.7 (m)/277 (m/s) = 2.5 millisconds. This means that the force exerted on him-the impulse divided by the time-would be a whopping 6514.4 (kg•m/s)/0.0025 (s) = 2,605,760 Newtons.

The blast winds are an incredibly dense shockwave. The entirety of their force is expended in a very short period of time- that's kinda the point of a bomb. The longer duration winds you're thinking of from films of nuclear blasts are not heading away from the blast site- they're heading towards it- the bomb's blast wave leaves behind it a volume of rarified air. So if Indy were flying towards the center of the bomb blast, you might have something.


Quoting the article as evidence is a bit counterproductive when my comments from the start were that the article was making some assumptions that were not supported by the video and my correlating my wondering about acceleration to your echoing the author's comments as fact.

Now, isn't a shockwave a compressive force? Essentially a very powerful audio wave? Compression waves aren't the same as the air moving out, just as waves moving through the ocean aren't the water moving hundreds of miles. Or, more apt for nuclear detonations, a tsunami, an intense compression artifact that travels through water as a medium over thousands of miles vs water moving as a wall over that distance. I see why you think we disagree, seeing how the overpressure essentially causes structures to implode, the reverse of what I understand sometimes happens with a tornado, but implosion doesn't throw objects. Compression waves, shockwaves, don't throw things around. They crush, they collapse, they shred organs, they help implode (still a comparatively slow action relying on air wanting to move to lower pressure, which to go back to wind is how wind works in the first place), but they don't fling things hundreds of yards or further.

The winds are a secondary effect to the nuclear detonation and happen, by what little I admit to knowing, when the air is being forced out as a consequence of a second sun briefly paying a visit to the surface of the Earth, superheating the gasses, causing rarefaction as a result, etc. But...that air goes out before it comes back in, the explosion forces it out, hence the whole blast winds thing blowing things out and away before the atmosphere draws back its breath. Hence the old test footage of mock houses being blown apart, outwards, that were emulated by the scene in the movie before being drawn back afterwards.

I'm not trying to lecture as I don't claim any special knowledge beyond what I've read when curiosity led me to reading through some of the old government releases discussing the effects of nuclear weapons, how they destroy things (fascinating reading), etc with the greater weight lent to how to emergency responses should be handled. This whole thing is kind of a stupid argument, really, but thanks to the article author making some pretty stupid assumptions from the beginning including the one that somehow a shockwave kicks things with near instantaneous acceleration.

Indy's still dead, but he didn't liquefy from tremendous acceleration. Lucas remains a hack.
 
2012-03-18 07:45:04 PM

Diogenes Teufelsdrockh: I see why you think we disagree, seeing how the overpressure essentially causes structures to implode, the reverse of what I understand sometimes happens with a tornado, but implosion doesn't throw objects


This is true, but what you're actually saying is that the blast could not have thrown the fridge to begin with. I agree. But it's vaguely possible, and it's what happened in the film, so that's what we need to discuss.

You're right- a whole pile of air got superheated and did what hot things do- expanded. It expanded faster than the speed of sound, and piled up against slow-moving air, creating a compression wave. A single, large wave, moving faster than the speed of sound- significantly faster. Outside of that expanding wave, the air would be still- there's no leading wind, or at least not very much (that whole speed of sound thing- the wave is traveling faster than the air its compressing). That wave struck the fridge for a very short period of time, and any force it imparted would have to be delivered during that window for impulse.

Once the wave passes, there's a slight vacuum behind it. After a few moments, the pressure will equalize, meaning a powerful wind will rush back into the blast zone- not away from it.
 
2012-03-18 07:49:48 PM

Normal Bean: SharkTrager: Toshiro Mifune's Letter Opener: Bathia_Mapes: Roook: Indy drank from the holy grail. A nuclear blast won't do shiat to him. The only reason he climbed in the fridge was to protect his clothes and himself from radiation so he wouldn't need to be buried in a lead lined tomb underneath 100 feet of concrete.

IIRC, he lost the immortality that the Grail gave him once he crossed the Great Seal.

Precisely that.

Quoth the knight: "You have chosen... wisely... but the Grail cannot pass beyond the Great Seal. That is the boundary, and the price of immortality."

He didn't "lose immortality". The grail did not give permanent immortality, it simply extended your life. You had to keep drinking from it to stay alive forever. Since it couldn't cross the seal you had to stay there to keep using it. It is plausible that he still had some benefit of it later on.

WHY couldn't it cross the Seal? It obviously crossed it when they brought it in to the cave. After all, the whole story of Jesus didn't occur in a cave (so to speak).


I think that gets back to the magic thing. After the death of Christ the grail was "lost". I would assume God placed it in the cave. The knights found it and discovered it couldn't leave. I would assume the seal and the defenses were built by the knights to protect the grail as well as to serve as a warning.
 
2012-03-18 07:55:26 PM

Diogenes Teufelsdrockh: I wonder about that...the acceleration isn't near instantaneous from the shockwave (was the author referencing static overpressure?), but shown to be a result of the blast winds. Throw something up into the wind on a windy day and it isn't immediately accelerated to the velocity of the wind, but experiences something much, much more gradual. Constant force over several seconds vs fraction of a second impulse. (Anecdotally, I've been picked up and thrown by a strong wind gust and it didn't snap my neck or liquefy me from the acceleration.) Can't really judge just from watching the mock town get blasted for, when it comes to strong wind, it doesn't take a whole lot to tear a house apart.


Very well, you are correct. Provided that someone gently toss a refrigerator up into the air so that it can be slowly accelerated by the wind and not by anything like a supersonic shock wave.
 
2012-03-18 07:55:55 PM

Critch: Raiders of the Lost Ark - Indy survives multiple things that would kill a normal person, not the least of which being strapped to a Submarine for a long time. At the end God kills everyone that looked at the Ark.


I just assumed the sub didn't submerge since they move faster on the surface.
 
2012-03-18 07:58:30 PM
farkeruk: Most of Who Framed Roger Rabbit is insane. The Gun Kata in Equilibrium is ridiculous. That stuff in The Matrix about "with a form of fusion" is complete tosh. The raft landing in Temple of Doom is probably impossible. The opening of Star Wars has a silly "hold your fire" moment that makes no sense. What, the empire can't afford an extra blast shot (and no, don't give me none of your Extended Universe explanations).

What separates those from Indy IV is that they were all cool. If you're having a good time, you'll gloss over stupid shiat. You will suspend disbelief. In the case of Roger Rabbit pulling his hand from handcuffs "only when it was funny", you laugh your ass off at how deliberately ridiculous it is. It's only when you're not having a good time that you start analysing a movie.


This isn't rule of cool, this is the contract of suspension of disbelief.

Roger Rabbit: we accept, because the story establishes that this is a cartoonish world with cartoonish rules.

Equilibrium: We accept, because they spend time explaining how they derived the gunkata, though it's a work of fiction, they establish the gunkata as a piece of their fictional universe (IE, we've analyzed so much data and have come up with a statistical way to move to be most likely to avoid bullets).

The Matrix: Most of it takes place inside of a computer sim (I'm not sure of the specific thing you're referencing though, so grain of salt this one).

Star wars: yeah, that breaks the contract.

Indiana Jones: breaks the contract bigtime, because there's nothing particularly supernatural going on, and they never take even a moment to explain how a human survives a nuclear blast by hiding in a fridge, not to mention being tossed who knows how far. This scene takes the contract of suspension of disbelief, wipes its ass with it, and stuffs it in our mouths.
 
2012-03-18 08:09:40 PM

Critch: Raiders of the Lost Ark - Indy survives multiple things that would kill a normal person, not the least of which being strapped to a Submarine for a long time. At the end God kills everyone that looked at the Ark.

Temple of Doom - Not only surviving tons of things with the crazy Kali people, there's the whole thing with falling out of the plane with the raft.

Last Crusade - Again, a ton of ways Indy should have been seriously injured, but survived with no problems.

Crystal Skull is consistent with a franchise that is batshiat insane. It's also a franchise where impossible religious artifacts are just strewn around for the Nazis to find, and this was a movie regarding aliens from another dimension.


The holding-onto-the-sub thing is reasonable if it stayed on the surface. WWII-era subs moved faster on the surface (source at navy.mil) so that's plausible. The only thing I remember being possibly unrealistic was being dragged behind a truck, and it at least looked plausible.

Relying on suspension of disbelief went overboard in the very next film. I remember when the mining car went over a big gap in the track and just happened to land perfectly aligned on the other side. The whole audience went "Aaaawww" (in the "oh, puhleeze" sense). I lost interest after that one.

Nuking the fridge wasn't just about the nuke itself, or the acceleration. That thing landed hard, and bounced repeatedly, yet the door somehow didn't open until it was still, and Indy rolled out none the worse for wear. He would have been broken and bloody from that alone -- and there was no magic to explain it away.
 
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