If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Washington Post)   Not only are they less interested in working hard, personal responsibility, achievement, competition, independence, modesty, and moving out of the house, but the new generation doesn't care all that much about the environment, either   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 246
    More: Sad, Americans, Journal of Personality, student housing, Generation X, independence, Jean Twenge, environmental studies, DePaul University in Chicago  
•       •       •

11741 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Mar 2012 at 1:19 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



246 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-03-16 02:38:21 PM
Maybe because we figure were doing enough as it is? Using CFLs and other power saving devices, weve never bought an appliance that wasnt "energy star certified", we think we drive high mileage cars (my 15 year old neon gets 30mpg, big whup), we recycle everything anyway. Id never think of throwing a soda can in the trash, it would never even cross my mind, and i get annoyed if i buy something and its container is a plastic i cant put in the recycling. And littering? I dont think ive ever intentionally littered, ive had stuff fall out of my pockets and blow away before i could grab it and felt guilty about it. This stuff used to be a big farking deal, but now its just ingrained, we certainly do more for the environment than previous generations, but its so passive nowadays it sure doesnt seem like it.

Plus yeah, its hard to give a fark when you cant find a job thatll pay enough to let you move out of your parents house. Back when you could work only a part time job and afford rent on a small place and payments on an older car and gas and everything you had time to care. People who are working 70 hours a week at two minimum wage jobs just to keep the lights on really dont have time to give a fark.
 
2012-03-16 02:42:44 PM
Maybe we should finally get over attributing, uh... attributes to entire generations of people. Whaddya say?
 
2012-03-16 02:42:50 PM
Orgasmatron138


As we all know, broad, sweeping generalizations about groups of people are ALWAYS correct

Usually, yeah they are correct.

What's often incorrect is projecting those attributes of a "a group of people" on to a singular person of that group
 
2012-03-16 02:43:41 PM
There is no one reason; it's a combination of many things, including those mentioned above. And it's not just environmental concerns, it's pretty much any "cause".

General apathy: There are always going to be some people who just don't care.

Purity tests: When the advocates spend more time trying to out-care each other than they do working together to address the biggest problems and work their way down, the cause quickly becomes a parody of itself and people don't want to get involved. Especially when the attitude is "if you use plastic shopping bags, you're just as bad as the guys raping Canadian forests to get at the tar sands". This is closely related to...

Saturation: When everything is "a critical threat to the environment", people can't prioritize. When you're told that everything you do in life results in wanton destruction it's hard to tell what's true, let alone prioritize. And when advocates turn out to be wrong about something they've been pounding people over the head with, it severely damages their credibility on the things they're right about.

Success: Movements can eventually become victims of their own success, at least in terms of it being a "movement". Slavery's pretty farking bad, right? So why aren't we marching in the streets, and why don't young people put it on the list of things they really care about? Because that battle has pretty much been fought and won. Same thing with many environmental issues. There is certainly still work to be done, but we have made a lot of progress on many fronts. And people who came after the battle was fought don't necessarily see things as part of a movement, it's just the way things are (take littering as an example... people don't necessarily do it because they feel like they're saving the planet every time they recycle a can, littering is just something you don't do). So even though you're walking the walk, you don't necessarily identify or describe it as such. This should actually be the goal, but going back to the above, a lot of people have a vested interest in perpetuating panic and guilt trips so they can maintain their identity as a crusader.

Tangibility: Tied to the success topic above. It's easy to get people riled up when there's trash everywhere, the Cuyahoga is on fire, etc. If I care about clean water, I can help by not dumping paint down the street drain. But after you get a lot of the obvious things taken care of, it's harder for people to make a connection. Compare acid rain and climate change; it's relatively easy to pinpoint a tangible cause and effect with acid rain (especially when it's easy to point the finger at someone else)... climate change, not so much. And I'm not talking about the denial debate; even among people who believe that climate change is real, it's hard to get worked up when there's not a clear image in front of you about what it means (and since there are so many factors, it's hard to get worked up about a hurricane or a flood theoretically made worse by climate change) or what you, as an individual, can practically do about it that would make much difference.
 
2012-03-16 02:44:22 PM

DrewCurtisJr: What's the unemployment rate in this group?

Before you can start caring about the environment, animal rights, and all that stuff you have to have a decent job. Unless you are just a hippie.


Honestly, I think a lot of us really do care even without a job. We just aren't in a position to do anything until we have our own needs met.
 
2012-03-16 02:44:24 PM
But they blog furiously about blogging furiously about their right to sit around and condemn you.
 
2012-03-16 02:44:40 PM

Orgasmatron138: As we all know, broad, sweeping generalizations about groups of people are ALWAYS correct.


Only when it comes to conservatives. With them the broad, sweeping generalizations are not evil at all.
 
2012-03-16 02:45:20 PM
natmar_76


Competition is bull shiat. Cooperation is much better.

I give you a 3.0 on the troll meter
 
2012-03-16 02:47:09 PM

fireclown: Lsherm: Rapmaster2000: That was one of my favorite things about Anchorman. How everyone just casually tossed their trash when they were done with it.

Mine too. I picked up on it immediately, but some younger people I work with didn't notice it until I pointed it out. I don't think they realize how prevalent littering was in the 70's.

That and cars that belch black smoke. Cars used to be really filthy.


Leaded gas, carburetors, and no catalytic converter! That's what I'm talking about!

img20.imageshack.us
 
2012-03-16 02:49:07 PM

PsiChick: DrewCurtisJr: What's the unemployment rate in this group?

Before you can start caring about the environment, animal rights, and all that stuff you have to have a decent job. Unless you are just a hippie.

Honestly, I think a lot of us really do care even without a job. We just aren't in a position to do anything until we have our own needs met.


That's not very bootstrappy of you.

One hundred percent correct, yes, but not bootstrappy.
 
2012-03-16 02:49:41 PM

DrewCurtisJr: Goimir: Aww, c'mon. Seriously? Maybe if they weren't lazy they could get jobs!

Most people have to have a certain amount of financial security and comfort before they have room to worry about these secondary issues. Otherwise you are pretty much preoccupied with keeping a roof over your head, food on the table, and paying your bills.


This is perfectly well-said.

These two sentences could've replace the entire study/article.
 
2012-03-16 02:52:37 PM
credibilitypost.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-03-16 02:53:18 PM

Yaxe: Mostly because Americans like myself have grown up watching their parents and their grandparents try to take as much as possible. We're apathetic now because we live in the decline, of an America suddenly dealing with the shock of things on the downhill. We can lie to ourselves all we want, but at some point, rebellion or revolution will happen.

I hope it's soon. America needs it.


And what exactly do you think is going to replace it? However much the US has recently declined, it is still one of the freest and most prosperous countries in the history of the world. If your ideologically- blinkered teachers had ever bothered to teach you the truth about Communism and its dozens of millions of victims, you'd be pissing yourself with fear about the idea of an impending "revolution" aimed at the forcible redistribution of power and property. Be grateful for what you have and work within the system to make the changes you want: anything more is suicidal lunacy.
 
2012-03-16 02:53:55 PM
Translation: We farked up the planet. We did a terrible job raising our kids. We squandered a massive lead in technology and wealth. We are greedy, selfish and stupid.



And now we are going to blame everything on our kids.
 
2012-03-16 02:54:39 PM

natmar_76: Competition is bull shiat. Cooperation is much better.


Competition is bullshiat? Spoken like a true socialist.
 
2012-03-16 02:55:13 PM

patrick767: Egoy3k
Recycling, unless it's metal it uses more energy then just making new stuff

Citation needed.


You need a citation on how shipping empty plastics to a depot, then sorting them, chipping them and shipping the chips to another facility to be blended into new material is more expensive and uses more energy than using readily available byproducts of the oil industry to just make new plastics? Really? You do realize how low the density of empty plastics is right? How it takes an assload of trucks to transport them to processing facilities?

and landfills are not running out of space.

Well clearly what we want to do is keep building more and more giant mounds of garbage.


No but burning more fossil fuels to avoid a non issue is stupid.

paper is another one, pulp paper production is completely feasible as a renewable resource not to mention the bleaches that are used in recycling are not exactly good for the environment.

Trees are renewable to a point and when carefully managed. Recycling paper is worse than logging, replanting, and making new paper? Citation needed.


I didn't say that, I said the bleaches which are used more heavily in recycled paper are harmful.


Donating to environmental causes is a waste of money since most of the money donated goes to the administration of the environmental group.

Citation needed showing that most or all environmental advocacy groups burn most of their money on administrative costs. If only there was a way to see how a charity group spends its money and determine if they manage their funds well, perhaps a couple internet charity navigator sites...


Fair enough I concede that maybe I'm jaded on the whole charity front but when i see a group of people I gave money to under the auspices of saving whales or whatever buy billboard space to tell me that I'm a horrible person for eating a steak I don't really want to give any more money.

Greenwashing has gotten to the point is insanity these days and most of us (I'm 28) just see it as a marketing ploy.

Sometimes it's a marketing ploy. Sometimes it's genuinely beneficial. Use some discretion.


So I should spend time researching the supply line of the companies who make my products? I really don't have the time for that and you can call me lazy all you want but I represent the view of the vast majority of people. Call us names all you want because we all know that will solve the problem.

Honestly I could care less if the laundry detergent I use hurts the brown tailed dung beetle all I care about is how much it costs and if it gets my clothes clean. Now if the actual environmental costs of products we buy was reflected in the sticker price then people would pay attention.
 
2012-03-16 02:55:17 PM
People would recycle, use environmentally friendly products, etc. if it were easier and more affordable. It doesn't make sense to buy the $10 bottle of environmentally friendly dish soap when Joy costs $3. 100% recycled printer paper is the same price (or a bit cheaper) then brand new paper, so most people I know use it. Unless you are printing up a resume do you REALLY need bright-ass white paper compared to the slightly greyer recycled stuff? Beside I hardly print ANYTHING anymore. I use my phone for recipes, coupons, to show pickup confirmations (take out, Best Buy, etc.), and I pretty much email anything I need to give to someone.

Recycling is a pain in the arse, so I don't do it. 1) I have no room in my house to collect recyclable garbage and b) there are no convenient recycle stations around. If we had curbside recycling (1 can for all recyclables) then I'd be far more inclined. Our city is on the right track though. We just last year got can to put yard waste directly into without bagging (grass clipping, weeds, tree branches, etc.) and you can have one additional can (at your cost) the same size next to it that they will also pick up. I love not having to bag grass clippings anymore, so I use it.

Make it easy and make it cheap. People with then do things to care more about the environment. As it is, environmentally conscience stuff costs 3X the price. There is NO WAY I'm paying more for something just because of that. If it is the same price as the item I'm about to buy, chances are I will buy the more environmentally friendly product.

Oh, and environmentally conscience people would do themselves well to disassociate with hippies/vegans/new-agers and focus their campaigns more towards the average Joe. Average Joe looks down on those granola heads and doesn't want to be involved in anything they are involved in.
 
2012-03-16 02:57:41 PM

crab66: Translation: We farked up the planet. We did a terrible job raising our kids. We squandered a massive lead in technology and wealth. We are greedy, selfish and stupid.



And now we are going to blame everything on our kids.


If it is stupid to generalize about today's generation, it is equally stupid to generalize about the past generations.
 
2012-03-16 02:59:11 PM
FTA: "A lot of young people also simply don't spend that much time exploring nature, said Beth Christensen, a professor who heads the environmental studies department at Adelphi University on Long Island in New York."

How can you enjoy nature when nature has been paved over and turned into an endless sprawl of sanitized subdivisions? These are people that have spent their childhood being micromanaged by psychotic 'parents,' shuttled from one useless stage-managed activity to another in the family minivan. Their only experience with 'nature' is likely at a manicured soccer field - if their parents couldn't find a well padded, safe, indoor facility.
 
2012-03-16 03:00:27 PM

Catsaregreen: As a 1984 high school graduate, I am so happy to see this. This may mean that the younger generation realizes it's been fed a load of crap that the earth is going to end/overheat/freeze/become a barren wasteland/etc. unless "the government" or some "environmentalist" i.e., Marxist hippie, doesn't protect us from ourselves.

In my lifetime, I've been told we're going into nuclear winter, we are going to nuke ourselves by 2000, acid rain will kill us all by 1990, there will be no more trees in 50 years, there will be no more oil by 2000, the oceans will be dead by 2000, global warming will cause the seas to rise and drown us all by 2020 and more and more hurricanes will happen from 2005, and so on.

And yet, the people who tell us we need to quit driving our minivans are using more fuel in one trip on their private jet than I'll use in several years.


Or someone spending extra money to buy a hybrid car instead of a reasonably efficient gasoline-only one only - by virtue of CAFE averages - indirectly enabling some other asshole to buy a Excursion for his family of four.
 
2012-03-16 03:01:50 PM

theknuckler_33: And now we are going to blame everything on our kids.

If it is stupid to generalize about today's generation, it is equally stupid to generalize about the past generations.


Wait, I thought this whole thread was about generalizing millions of people?



Well carry on then.
 
2012-03-16 03:01:54 PM

egao-gakari: Rik01: big long comment

I hope you don't mind, but I QFT'd you on my facebook page. I've never read a more accurate summary of why I personally don't bother getting involved. I can't imagine the reasons are very different for anyone in my generation.


So both of you don't do something because you won't get regard from others and no one else is doing it so you don't want to do it either.

You must be wonderful people who are responsible, with infallible ethics and pride in your own accomplishments.

Or douches. It's probably the last one. Douches. You're douches.
 
2012-03-16 03:02:52 PM

hailin: People would recycle, use environmentally friendly products, etc. if it were easier and more affordable. It doesn't make sense to buy the $10 bottle of environmentally friendly dish soap when Joy costs $3. 100% recycled printer paper is the same price (or a bit cheaper) then brand new paper, so most people I know use it. Unless you are printing up a resume do you REALLY need bright-ass white paper compared to the slightly greyer recycled stuff? Beside I hardly print ANYTHING anymore. I use my phone for recipes, coupons, to show pickup confirmations (take out, Best Buy, etc.), and I pretty much email anything I need to give to someone.

Recycling is a pain in the arse, so I don't do it. 1) I have no room in my house to collect recyclable garbage and b) there are no convenient recycle stations around. If we had curbside recycling (1 can for all recyclables) then I'd be far more inclined. Our city is on the right track though. We just last year got can to put yard waste directly into without bagging (grass clipping, weeds, tree branches, etc.) and you can have one additional can (at your cost) the same size next to it that they will also pick up. I love not having to bag grass clippings anymore, so I use it.

Make it easy and make it cheap. People with then do things to care more about the environment. As it is, environmentally conscience stuff costs 3X the price. There is NO WAY I'm paying more for something just because of that. If it is the same price as the item I'm about to buy, chances are I will buy the more environmentally friendly product.

Oh, and environmentally conscience people would do themselves well to disassociate with hippies/vegans/new-agers and focus their campaigns more towards the average Joe. Average Joe looks down on those granola heads and doesn't want to be involved in anything they are involved in.


One bottle of dish soap lasts me something like two months so the extra $7 isn't really missed. As far as recycling plastics, it's far cheaper, healthier and more environmentally friendly just to not drink so much damn soda.
 
2012-03-16 03:04:12 PM

Lunchlady: fireclown: tricycleracer: Because young Americans are stuck at step 4.

Nooooooooope. Self esteem they got.

I wouldn't be so sure.

I'm of that generation and while there are tons of people I know with misplaced senses of superiority there is an equally pervasive sense of failure with a lot of my friends. Everyone expected their lives to be different than what they are and even friends with good jobs still seem listless.

Remember when Bin Laden was killed and there were a thousands of goofy college kids out celebrating? While it was embarrassing I ask you, what else does our generation have to be proud of? We grew up with 9/11, Iraq, Recession, and debt. The most we've done is getting Obama elected but really, that's a hollow victory given what's happened since. (Note, we're still happy with him, but we're not stupid when it comes to reality. Most of us anyway)

I don't know what I'm really getting at, but the self-esteem you see is often hollow except in the most delusional of us.


This. A lot of kids out there who are stuck in retail or temping or back at their parent's house after college feel like complete failures. I worked hard, I studied hard, I haven't been unemployed since I was 16. But the fact that I couldn't find a full time job to support myself made me feel like an utter waste of space.
My generation celebrates what we have- our youth, killing Bin Laden. But between the recession and the pervasive regressive attitude it just feels so hopeless. You can only sustain anger over the economy and women's rights and gay marriage and the environment before you burn out and start thinking about the song from the Rocko's Modern Life movie: Link (new window)
 
2012-03-16 03:04:45 PM
I couldnt give a shiat less about the environment. Newsflash: no one is going to fix anything, why waste time and energy separating a bunch of crap. I mean does anyone know if your stuff actually gets recycled anyway? for all you know you drop it off or pay extra or have 3 separate trash cans for your junk and it all goes to the same place.

I guess if it makes you feel better about yourself, go ahead. But i'm too jaded to feel good about all that noise.
 
2012-03-16 03:05:19 PM
It is a natural by-product of the indoctrination which has replaced education in the school system, and also the endless scams foisted on the public, trying to put a human face on raw power.

By failing to factually inform the people, we allow them to throw the baby out with the bath water, so to speak. Obviously, a clean environment is desirable, but not at the expense of sacrificing the civil rights and a large percentage of the public's income as well, all to support a useless clique of elitist parasites.

They say they want a better life for all, but what they mean is they want a better living for themselves.
 
2012-03-16 03:06:23 PM
"I look out for me and mine. That don't include you 'less I conjure it does."
 
2012-03-16 03:07:12 PM

canyoneer: Maybe they're tired of the poisonous atmosphere surrounding any and all political issues in this country.
Rhetoric - death - wilderness - honesty


I met Stiles once. Used to subscribe to his paper. He's always been a rabble-rouser.
Funny that he now lives in Monticello. He used to live in Moab. It must have gotten too crowded for him. He probably sold his house in Moab for 20 times what he bought it for. He can afford to care about the environment.

/Yes, I'm bitter.
 
2012-03-16 03:07:37 PM

Draq: hailin: People would recycle, use environmentally friendly products, etc. if it were easier and more affordable. It doesn't make sense to buy the $10 bottle of environmentally friendly dish soap when Joy costs $3. 100% recycled printer paper is the same price (or a bit cheaper) then brand new paper, so most people I know use it. Unless you are printing up a resume do you REALLY need bright-ass white paper compared to the slightly greyer recycled stuff? Beside I hardly print ANYTHING anymore. I use my phone for recipes, coupons, to show pickup confirmations (take out, Best Buy, etc.), and I pretty much email anything I need to give to someone.

Recycling is a pain in the arse, so I don't do it. 1) I have no room in my house to collect recyclable garbage and b) there are no convenient recycle stations around. If we had curbside recycling (1 can for all recyclables) then I'd be far more inclined. Our city is on the right track though. We just last year got can to put yard waste directly into without bagging (grass clipping, weeds, tree branches, etc.) and you can have one additional can (at your cost) the same size next to it that they will also pick up. I love not having to bag grass clippings anymore, so I use it.

Make it easy and make it cheap. People with then do things to care more about the environment. As it is, environmentally conscience stuff costs 3X the price. There is NO WAY I'm paying more for something just because of that. If it is the same price as the item I'm about to buy, chances are I will buy the more environmentally friendly product.

Oh, and environmentally conscience people would do themselves well to disassociate with hippies/vegans/new-agers and focus their campaigns more towards the average Joe. Average Joe looks down on those granola heads and doesn't want to be involved in anything they are involved in.

One bottle of dish soap lasts me something like two months so the extra $7 isn't really missed. As far as recycling plastics, it's far ch ...


Pedant. You is one.
 
2012-03-16 03:08:43 PM

Harvey Manfrenjensenjen: Success: Movements can eventually become victims of their own success, at least in terms of it being a "movement". Slavery's pretty farking bad, right? So why aren't we marching in the streets, and why don't young people put it on the list of things they really care about? Because that battle has pretty much been fought and won. Same thing with many environmental issues.


Well, there are upsides and downsides to increased awareness. For example, take better awareness of the basics of biochemistry:

Upside: Because people generally understand that industrial chemicals are reactive and need to be contained, people have been much more amenable to things like buffer zones around chemical plants and water-quality monitoring.

Downside: Because people are more aware that industrial chemicals can get into places they shouldn't be, incredibly stupid people have developed this weird mythology of "toxins" and then came up with organic farming, which is the single most environmentally unfriendly thing that humanity has come up with since sulfated gasoline.

But yeah, in general, I think the fact that kids today turn the light out when they leave the house because it's basically sensible instead of sucking each others' dicks over how it means they personally saved the rainforest is probably a good thing.
 
2012-03-16 03:10:22 PM
Blah blah blah blah blah.



/got matched today for residency
//I'll GLADLY get off your lawn but don't come see me for your BP issues
///I keed! I keed!
 
2012-03-16 03:13:00 PM

Lsherm: fireclown: Lsherm: Rapmaster2000: That was one of my favorite things about Anchorman. How everyone just casually tossed their trash when they were done with it.

Mine too. I picked up on it immediately, but some younger people I work with didn't notice it until I pointed it out. I don't think they realize how prevalent littering was in the 70's.

That and cars that belch black smoke. Cars used to be really filthy.

Leaded gas, carburetors, and no catalytic converter! That's what I'm talking about!

[img20.imageshack.us image 630x420]


Don' forget rivers that caught on fire.

www.ohiohistorycentral.org
 
2012-03-16 03:13:28 PM

DrewCurtisJr: Before you can start caring about the environment, animal rights, and all that stuff you have to have a decent job. Unless you are just a hippie


Why a job? fark managers, take what you deserve and get what you need without the middleman of money if at all possible. What's the point of working for others in a world you end up destroying?
Guess I'm a hippie, although I don't cotton to animal rights in the sense of putting them on equal value as a human life, I'm no vegan or vegetarian.
But I do push an anti-authoritarian/anarchist vision and help out with the local community gardens and environmental projects when I can. Currently organizing a May Day general strike.
 
2012-03-16 03:14:50 PM

tricycleracer: Because young Americans are stuck at step 4.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 450x338]


Most high school kids are still stuck at 1. Mainly the sex and food part.


/Teaches high school
 
2012-03-16 03:15:16 PM

canyoneer: Yaxe: Mostly because Americans like myself have grown up watching their parents and their grandparents try to take as much as possible. We're apathetic now because we live in the decline, of an America suddenly dealing with the shock of things on the downhill. We can lie to ourselves all we want, but at some point, rebellion or revolution will happen. I hope it's soon. America needs it.

Has it occurred to you that maybe a revolution would not reverse the decline? That perhaps the decline is caused by deeper structural problems - perhaps unsolvable - and that a new way of life will have to emerge? That perhaps our collective worldview and assumptions have been wrong in many respects - especially when it comes to the exploitation of the physical world and the standard of living which can reasonably be expected by the majority of human beings? That the revolution will not be political, per se?

It's interesting to read the words of intelligent but dispirited youth. It's more than just the usual angst of youth, it's an involuntary organic realization that all is not right and that expectations are dashed. Examine your expectations, and the assumptions that you've been taught to make. Then go from there. You have to make the future, and it's not going to look very much like the past. Your parents and grandparents won't help - they're incapable of challenging their assumptions. You have to do it.


well, the important thing for us yutes to realize is that it will get worse before it gets better, but there won't be an apocalypse. and it won't ever be as easy as it was for our previous generations.

/ there is no such thing as revolution. there' s a changing of the guard.
 
2012-03-16 03:15:46 PM

natmar_76: Competition is bull shiat. Cooperation is much better.


This.
People need to put down the Atlas Shrugged and pick up Mutual Aid.
 
2012-03-16 03:15:46 PM
We're just more honest to strangers on the phone and lack the wide strip of guilt that drove our parents to fib a bit, which skews the numbers of "people who are doing something".

/guilt firmly DISPLACED
 
2012-03-16 03:17:20 PM

cryinoutloud: canyoneerI met Stiles once. Used to subscribe to his paper. He's always been a rabble-rouser. Funny that he now lives in Monticello. He used to live in Moab. It must have gotten too crowded for him. He probably sold his house in Moab for 20 times what he bought it for. He can afford to care about the environment. Yes, I'm bitter.


All I can say is he must have been desperate to move to Monticello - not because of the Mormons and all that, but because Monticello is bleak. Conveneint to many wonders, but in a bleak setting. I generally agree with his take on things these days. There's a lot of bullsh*t on both sides, and as long as more people keep packing into the Western states, the landscape will continue to get trashed no matter what.
 
2012-03-16 03:17:30 PM

Lsherm: Leaded gas, carburetors, and no catalytic converter! That's what I'm talking about!


That is simultaneously the most appalling and most awesome vehicle I have seen in a long time.
 
2012-03-16 03:18:29 PM

alwaysjaded: Another "get off my lawn" thread? Is it Friday already?


Another blame my parents thread?
Is it friday already?
 
2012-03-16 03:20:02 PM
Sup. Generation Y- Bother here. Millenials. Whatevet the fark you want to call us.

It's totally the burn out, ever since i was a kid every little thing has become a cause for someone, someone is outraged because we aren't outraged. We've been yelled at about how we should be giving more, caring more, doing more. There's always some lady with sad puppies staring at us, some dude who's clothes are worth more than the entire african village he is walking through , all of them repeating the same mantra.

Enough is not enough. Give, you must give. Enough is not enough.

I like to stay informed, i like to stay active in the world (part of the reason i came to Fark).But i'm not an environmental person (you'll see me more often in the Politics tab), i think we've put so much stock in this "green" thing it's become this mantra they can hide behind. It's an ideal that's lost it's way from doing shiat like picking up trash in your town like that other guy was talking about. I get your message man.

But i see people hiding being the green brand, yes a brand like Coke or Apple. it's just another product people identify with and feel that through association they don't have to give. They've done enough despite their leaders crying for more. They only see their "carbon footprint" , but not the latte cup they just missed throwing at the trashcan and just walked away from.

You have more of an influence at your local level, people are too caught up in the ethereal ideals of being "green" without thinking what they can do to inspire others to do good. Not everyone is into saving the world, only doing their part. And once we stop yelling at everyone to save the world as a whole, we will stop feeling burned out and see what problems we can fix already.
 
2012-03-16 03:22:13 PM
1990's society: Take out loans and get a good education so you don't have to flip burgers or a living.
2010's society: Go flip burgers to service your education loans.

Thanks so much. You're damn right I don't give a shiat about the environment. I'm just trying to get by.
 
2012-03-16 03:22:42 PM

Egoy3k: Maybe some of us can see through the lies...

Recycling, unless it's metal it uses more energy then just making new stuff and landfills are not running out of space. Until such time as we move away from oil for energy synthetics will be cheap, plentiful and made from scratch for much less than it costs in dollars or energy to recycle.

paper is another one, pulp paper production is completely feasible as a renewable resource not to mention the bleaches that are used in recycling are not exactly good for the environment.

Donating to environmental causes is a waste of money since most of the money donated goes to the administration of the environmental group.

Greenwashing has gotten to the point is insanity these days and most of us (I'm 28) just see it as a marketing ploy.

"Use our brand detergent made from chemicals produced in the third world, shipped to and packaged in a different third world country, then shipped to a first world dock, shipped to a local warehouse. then shipped to your local store because it gives you whiter whites in cold water saving you 1 kWh of electricity!"


Heard all of this and am doing my best to keep abreast.
I don't vote or fark with money too much anyway unless I know exactly who or where it's going, my philosophy is direct action and local as possible. But I guess in the end it's a matter of picking and choosing your compromises.
 
2012-03-16 03:23:10 PM

pute kisses like a man: well, the important thing for us yutes to realize is that it will get worse before it gets better, but there won't be an apocalypse. and it won't ever be as easy as it was for our previous generations. there is no such thing as revolution. there' s a changing of the guard.


It's going to be a different way of life - far less energy-intensive and mechanized. Adjust your expectations and seek joy in simpler things. You'll be the pioneers of the post-industrial era. You've got lots to do.
 
2012-03-16 03:23:25 PM
It is important to note that most of the survey data available for Millennials were collected before the country's most recent recession hit.

Any survey on attitudes collected before the recession hit is useless.
 
2012-03-16 03:24:00 PM

crab66: theknuckler_33: And now we are going to blame everything on our kids.

If it is stupid to generalize about today's generation, it is equally stupid to generalize about the past generations.

Wait, I thought this whole thread was about generalizing millions of people?


It may be. It is still stupid.
 
2012-03-16 03:28:55 PM
what are you talking about? Boomers changed the world and it is now perfect. time to just sit back and enjoy!!
 
2012-03-16 03:29:30 PM

CapnBlues: 1990's society: Take out loans and get a good education so you don't have to flip burgers or a living.
2010's society: Go flip burgers to service your education loans.

Thanks so much. You're damn right I don't give a shiat about the environment. I'm just trying to get by.


Caring about the environment and trying to get by are not mutually exclusive.

Also, persistent problems in the job market due to the worst recession since the 30s is hardly a reflection of the views of "2010's society".
 
2012-03-16 03:30:05 PM
Those whippersnappers will care when their skateboards and splashing around in the Atlantic Ocean... In Toledo!
 
2012-03-16 03:30:51 PM
i'm an old fart. anyone who wants to toss shiat at today's young people can lick and suck my low-hanging testes. the kids are stuck in a america that is major suck with no band-aid on the wound. i feel bad for todays youth. there is little opportunity for them to go out and make their mark on the world.

all that talent, all the education, the technology the young people are proficient in, it's going to waste because we don't have our collective american shiat together. the young folks are paying a hard price. their personal lives, growth and development are being retarded because our rich & powerful Pied Piper'd us all right down Shiat Street.

i can't imagine how incredibly frustrating it must be for our youth to be stuck in their parents houses with little opportunity for escape in site. getting out of the nest and stretching your wings is important to young folks. sooner or later they are all going to wake up to the fact that they are being skipped right over. i hope they all band together and set the world on fire.
 
Displayed 50 of 246 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report