Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Digital Trends)   RIAA says major ISPs set to turn into copyright police by July, throttling bandwidth and cutting off internet access to customers who are suspected of downloading copyrighted content illegally   (digitaltrends.com ) divider line
    More: Scary, ISPs, RIAA, environmental mitigation, automated system  
•       •       •

5790 clicks; posted to Geek » on 16 Mar 2012 at 4:25 AM (4 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



254 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2012-03-15 10:21:43 PM  
So they're gonna completely ignore the whole FCC's "YOU CAN'T THROTTLE YOUR CUSTOMER'S INTERNET" rule then?
 
2012-03-15 10:27:15 PM  
"Suspected," eh. So, customer has a contract with the ISP, a third party says to the ISP, "please degrade that customer's service because we say so."

Um, isn't there enough work for lawyers?
 
2012-03-15 10:39:19 PM  

gaslight: "Suspected," eh. So, customer has a contract with the ISP, a third party says to the ISP, "please degrade that customer's service because we say so."

Um, isn't there enough work for lawyers?


I believe their take on it is that "illegally downloading" such things is a violation of their Terms of Service which means they'll claim you violated the contract first allowing them to take punitive measures. I would like to see how it turns out in court though.
 
2012-03-15 11:00:06 PM  
gaslight
Um, isn't there enough work for lawyers?

Like you can afford a lawyer. The ISPs will go along with it because A times B times C of the customers is pretty much always going to be less than the RIAA/MPAA's X.
 
2012-03-15 11:54:57 PM  
So ... they are watching us right now? In that case:

Hey, assholes!

i1232.photobucket.com
 
2012-03-15 11:58:40 PM  
I for one embrace our... oh wait, nevermind
 
2012-03-16 12:02:29 AM  

HawgWild: So ... they are watching us right now? In that case:

Hey, assholes!

[i1232.photobucket.com image 116x119]


That just became my all time favorite gif.
 
2012-03-16 12:03:36 AM  
Dear RIAA:

Downloading or not, we're still not going to pay good money for any of the bullshiat you've been putting out since 1998. SORRY!
 
2012-03-16 12:07:49 AM  
But they are totally cool with us, going to the public library and making copies out of books, with the copy machines they have provided inside? In theory, because thanks to the internet...
 
2012-03-16 12:08:42 AM  
Dear RIAA:

Your business model is defunct. Quit trying to make it work through legislative and punitive measures. Adapt or die.

/downloaded most of what I like years ago
//now buy my mp3s from Amazon
///would pay $35/mo to a service that streamed on demand every movie distributed by an MPAA member since forever
 
2012-03-16 12:19:32 AM  

Codenamechaz: So they're gonna completely ignore the whole FCC's "YOU CAN'T THROTTLE YOUR CUSTOMER'S INTERNET" rule then?


Not only that, but RIAA seems to be uninterested in the the fact that there's a LOT of people out there in the world with weak or no encryption on their home wifi networks. so any file trader with half a brain is gonna just jack their neighborhood wifi hotspots and just keep right on trucking.
 
2012-03-16 12:21:34 AM  
This thread is full of "waaaahh fascist!" Their methods are quite heavy handed, but the bottom line is that people keep stealing their shiat, and technology has made it very easy to do. Stop stealing their shiat. Pay for it if you like it. And if you don't like it, like apparently Winkologist hasn't in 14 years, don't download it. Its a pretty shiatty excuse to say "The music hasn't been good since 1998, so I decided to steal it rather than pay for it. Sure it sucked, but I just had to have it. But you better be damn sure I wasn't going to pay for it!"
 
2012-03-16 12:23:32 AM  

Three Crooked Squirrels: but the bottom line is that people keep stealing their shiat,


So they need to go after the people doing it. They have the means, they have the lawyers. They need to stop being lazy and expect everyone else to do their work for them. Of course there's the matter that the RIAA doesn't actually represent the people who hold the copyrights. And doesn't actually represent the artists at all.
 
2012-03-16 12:34:23 AM  

Three Crooked Squirrels: Their methods are quite heavy handed, but the bottom line is that people keep stealing their shiat,


My daughters were talking to the band members of Tartanic the other day. She bought a CD from them (and had them autograph it). They asked her to let everyone around her at school/home/whatever pirate it. They understand this is the best method for getting their music known to more and more people. Word of mouth is a big deal in business. You know that.
 
2012-03-16 12:34:24 AM  

Three Crooked Squirrels: This thread is full of "waaaahh fascist!" Their methods are quite heavy handed, but the bottom line is that people keep stealing their shiat, and technology has made it very easy to do. Stop stealing their shiat. Pay for it if you like it. And if you don't like it, like apparently Winkologist hasn't in 14 years, don't download it. Its a pretty shiatty excuse to say "The music hasn't been good since 1998, so I decided to steal it rather than pay for it. Sure it sucked, but I just had to have it. But you better be damn sure I wasn't going to pay for it!"


*sigh*

this 'argument'/defense gets tiresome. how about RIAA and the industry it represents meets us halfway? Technology has evolved, consumers have adapted to new business models...yet RIAA and it's backers want - no they DEMAND that the rest of the world freeze in place and bow to their old, inefficient and outdated way of doing business. why is that? why should I, as a consumer, put up with a business model that's inefficient? the entire point of free market capitalism is to weed out old, clunky ways of doing business and provide a product to consumers cheaper and more effectively. I submit that RIAA is merely paying the price for being out of date and obsolete. what I want to know from you is why we should protect an industry that's refusing to keep up with the times?
 
2012-03-16 12:40:20 AM  

WhyteRaven74: Three Crooked Squirrels: but the bottom line is that people keep stealing their shiat,

So they need to go after the people doing it. They have the means, they have the lawyers. They need to stop being lazy and expect everyone else to do their work for them. Of course there's the matter that the RIAA doesn't actually represent the people who hold the copyrights. And doesn't actually represent the artists at all.


I don't know about not representing the copyright holders or the artists. Not sure what that is about.

Let me preface this by saying I don't know much about technology. But you say they have the means to go after the violaters. Do they? There are millions and millions of them. Can they really go after all of them? And when they do, they are faced with article after article of "Can you believe they went after a 12 year old girl?" when at the same time, no one would care if the same girl were arrested for stealing a pack of gum.

I do think their tactics are heavy handed, and their math is ridiculous, but people do violate copyright laws on a massive scale on a daily basis. I don't pretend to have the answer. But it doesn't surprise me one bit that ISPs would team up with them. They depend on that content. I imagine they would bend to the content-providers' demands at some point.
 
2012-03-16 12:41:21 AM  

Three Crooked Squirrels: This thread is full of "waaaahh fascist!" Their methods are quite heavy handed, but the bottom line is that people keep stealing their shiat, and technology has made it very easy to do. Stop stealing their shiat. Pay for it if you like it. And if you don't like it, like apparently Winkologist hasn't in 14 years, don't download it. Its a pretty shiatty excuse to say "The music hasn't been good since 1998, so I decided to steal it rather than pay for it. Sure it sucked, but I just had to have it. But you better be damn sure I wasn't going to pay for it!"


I'm sorry that the future is arriving without you or the legacy content controllers. It's something you will have to deal with.
 
2012-03-16 12:44:36 AM  
Copyright infringement is not stealing. This is actually a very important distinction if you want to engage in a discussion about these issues. Stealing would be completely removing the item in question from the owner. The only way to really steal copyright or copyrighted works is to prevent the owner from distributing it. And the only people who do that are the RIAA, MPAA, and similar legacy content controller organizations.
 
2012-03-16 12:44:59 AM  

Three Crooked Squirrels:
I do think their tactics are heavy handed, and their math is ridiculous, but people do violate copyright laws on a massive scale on a daily basis. I don't pretend to have the answer. But it doesn't surprise me one bit that ISPs would team up with them. They depend on that content. I imagine they would bend to the content-providers' demands at some point.


why do you defend an outdated business model?
 
2012-03-16 12:46:07 AM  

Weaver95: Three Crooked Squirrels: This thread is full of "waaaahh fascist!" Their methods are quite heavy handed, but the bottom line is that people keep stealing their shiat, and technology has made it very easy to do. Stop stealing their shiat. Pay for it if you like it. And if you don't like it, like apparently Winkologist hasn't in 14 years, don't download it. Its a pretty shiatty excuse to say "The music hasn't been good since 1998, so I decided to steal it rather than pay for it. Sure it sucked, but I just had to have it. But you better be damn sure I wasn't going to pay for it!"

*sigh*

this 'argument'/defense gets tiresome. how about RIAA and the industry it represents meets us halfway? Technology has evolved, consumers have adapted to new business models...yet RIAA and it's backers want - no they DEMAND that the rest of the world freeze in place and bow to their old, inefficient and outdated way of doing business. why is that? why should I, as a consumer, put up with a business model that's inefficient? the entire point of free market capitalism is to weed out old, clunky ways of doing business and provide a product to consumers cheaper and more effectively. I submit that RIAA is merely paying the price for being out of date and obsolete. what I want to know from you is why we should protect an industry that's refusing to keep up with the times?


If the industry chooses not to adapt and makes a poor business decision, it will suffer the consequences. That doesn't mean you have the right to steal from a poor businessman. If there is a better way, as you suggest, then capitalism will provide an alternative, just as you suggested, by weeding out this clunky old model. Until that alternative arrives, the clunky old guy should be free to try to protect his copyrighted material from being stolen.
 
2012-03-16 12:47:18 AM  

TheOmni: Copyright infringement is not stealing. This is actually a very important distinction if you want to engage in a discussion about these issues. Stealing would be completely removing the item in question from the owner. The only way to really steal copyright or copyrighted works is to prevent the owner from distributing it. And the only people who do that are the RIAA, MPAA, and similar legacy content controller organizations.


we've beaten that into his skull many many many times. I think squirrels knows the difference between copyright infringement and theft. He just calls it theft because it makes for better propaganda.
 
2012-03-16 12:49:24 AM  

Three Crooked Squirrels:
If the industry chooses not to adapt and makes a poor business decision, it will suffer the consequences. That doesn't mean you have the right to steal from a poor businessman. If there is a better way, as you suggest, then capitalism will provide an alternative, just as you suggested, by weeding out this clunky old model. Until that alternative arrives, the clunky old guy should be free to try to protect his copyrighted material from being stolen.


actually, that is EXACTLY what happens to them - the market WILL find a way around the artificial restraints attempted by RIAA and it's backers. Copyright infringement is one of those self invented solutions consumers will adapt for themselves.

RIAA needs to change the way they do business, adapt newer technologies, and stop attempting to force the rest of the world to freeze in place.
 
2012-03-16 12:50:08 AM  
Well, I am obviously outnumbered in this thread and I am going to bed. Going to go to sleep listenng to a dubbed tape of Cyndi Lauper I copied on my double-decked boom box in 1985 while reading short stories I copied at the libraary for 10 cents a page.
 
2012-03-16 01:02:50 AM  
If I were a provider of a legal service,
it would be UN-business-like to turn in my customers on hearsay and conjecture.
 
2012-03-16 01:13:57 AM  
So I've been thinking about this and I'm a little stumped. What exactly can I (or we) do about this. It's not a law, so contacting my representatives doesn't seem to be an option. My ISP holds a monopoly on internet service and even if they didn't it looks like most of the major ones are joining in on this scheme. The RIAA and MPAA are anti-consumer lobbying organizations, so there's not really much I can do about them. So ... what should be done?
 
2012-03-16 01:52:52 AM  
The copyright math link was good today. And I see we already have people in the thread who should watch it. Link (new window)
 
2012-03-16 01:56:26 AM  

TheOmni: So I've been thinking about this and I'm a little stumped. What exactly can I (or we) do about this. It's not a law, so contacting my representatives doesn't seem to be an option. My ISP holds a monopoly on internet service and even if they didn't it looks like most of the major ones are joining in on this scheme. The RIAA and MPAA are anti-consumer lobbying organizations, so there's not really much I can do about them. So ... what should be done?


Safepeer/PeerBlock works for me.....
 
2012-03-16 02:12:25 AM  
Band finds success outside of major label paradigm. RIAA "suspects" band of piracy. Site bandwidth gets throttled.
 
2012-03-16 02:13:12 AM  
TheOmni
My ISP holds a monopoly on internet service

There are other ways of having an Internet, such as a wifi 'web'. These efforts are being developed (by people who are much smarter than me) and we'll probably be seeing them get rolled out in ways that can go viral within a few years, if not months.
 
2012-03-16 02:17:19 AM  
I have to stick up for 3 squirrels. I don't think anyone is concerned about record companies, we're concerned about bands. And if you don't buy the music from the band (at the show if you want the most money to go to them), and you do that consistently, you may be hurting that band's ability to put out another effort. Semantics about theft vs. copyright are wonderfully esoteric but don't necessarily address the point. Sleep well Squirells cubed.
 
2012-03-16 02:21:16 AM  
Dammit, I spelled Squirrels wrong at the end there. Let the Omni/Weaver savaging begin. But not over spelling.
 
2012-03-16 02:26:34 AM  

Craig_Kreist: I have to stick up for 3 squirrels. I don't think anyone is concerned about record companies, we're concerned about bands. And if you don't buy the music from the band (at the show if you want the most money to go to them), and you do that consistently, you may be hurting that band's ability to put out another effort. Semantics about theft vs. copyright are wonderfully esoteric but don't necessarily address the point. Sleep well Squirells cubed.


so why go through a major record label at all? you can bypass most of their bullshiat and sell direct to consumers now. distribution is even easier and cheaper than ever before.
 
2012-03-16 02:31:50 AM  

Weaver95: so why go through a major record label at all? you can bypass most of their bullshiat and sell direct to consumers now.


And then the RIAA, BMI, or ASCAP decides you're cutting into their profit margin. Suddenly they "suspect" you of piracy and your site becomes inaccessible.
 
2012-03-16 02:33:25 AM  
You have a valid point. Foster the People maybe an example? Haven't checked to see if the got signed, but they're playing Red Rocks and that first song was started on the net. I admit I'm older and probly go to more mainstream shows where the bands have done the system and therefore speak out against sharing.

I do hope your theory on the paradigm shift is correct.
 
2012-03-16 03:32:47 AM  
What freaks me is that they could easily start coming up with algorithms that profile users based on how "likely" they supposedly are to break copyrights.

Say you d/l every new CD that charts. Are you really spending all that coin? Best check up on you.

Say everything you d/l is out of print. You're definitely not paying rights fees on that. Probably bust you right off the bat.
 
2012-03-16 03:48:48 AM  
I like how people think that the RIAA is some soulless corporation that tries to profit at any cost necessary. They are a business. It is their job to profit at any cost necessary.
 
2012-03-16 04:03:52 AM  

Mike_LowELL: I like how people think that the RIAA is some soulless corporation that tries to profit at any cost necessary. They are a business. It is their job to profit at any cost necessary.


You've got us there. We should just pack it in and stop saying mean stuff about them. We're hurting their poor little feelings, aren't we?
 
2012-03-16 04:05:48 AM  

Mike_LowELL: I like how people think that the RIAA is some soulless corporation that tries to profit at any cost necessary. They are a business. It is their job to profit at any cost necessary.


Today's stock prices are more important than tomorrow's bankruptcy proceedings.

That's pretty much the 21st century corporate mantra.
 
2012-03-16 04:11:51 AM  

Three Crooked Squirrels: That doesn't mean you have the right to steal from a poor businessman.


Actually, it really depends on the businessman. if he's a cad who's had every opportunity to improve and somehow refused each time, you're well within your rights to rob him blind George Clooney style 10 years down the road.

And that's where we are now. The artists and the consumers don't want or need the RIAA. They're just botfly larva in our back and now that technology is allowing us to pull them out, they're trying to worm deeper into our precious meat.
 
2012-03-16 04:29:25 AM  

Three Crooked Squirrels: I don't know about not representing the copyright holders or the artists. Not sure what that is about.


The RIAA represents record labels, and not even close to all of them. It does not represent the people who wrote the songs, the people who actually hold the copyrights to the music. And oh yeah, those people? When the RIAA does manage to sue someone, the people who actually hold the copyright to the music, don't get anything. So the RIAA isn't helping them out any.
 
2012-03-16 04:34:56 AM  
My personal alternative business model:

No downloading music that involves the RIAA, like NIN's Rainbows or Dead shows from archive.org. Spend no money that supports the RIAA at all. Pick up used CDs and rip them into your MP3 player, but in better sounding formats. File the CD away as your "backup". They don't like it, but it's legal and they've not figured out a way around it so far.

Get the whole album of your choice for sometimes less than the price of a few of its songs on iTunes. Discover some great tracks that aren't the big singles. If you only want a song or two, the expense will still average out in your favor this way. New releases are usually available used in places like Amazon after only a week or few.

If/when you can afford it, do support, and spend money on, bands who are using alternate methods of legal distribution.
 
2012-03-16 04:39:42 AM  

Nadie_AZ: HawgWild: So ... they are watching us right now? In that case:

Hey, assholes!

[i1232.photobucket.com image 116x119]

That just became my all time favorite gif.


i682.photobucket.com
 
2012-03-16 04:45:03 AM  
So....ripping songs from youtube vids is okay then, right?

/cause it's not a torrent
 
2012-03-16 04:51:22 AM  

RookStar: So....ripping songs from youtube vids is okay then, right?

/cause it's not a torrent


Yep. FTP, direct download sites and newsgroups are also kosher.
 
2012-03-16 05:20:21 AM  

Three Crooked Squirrels: This thread is full of "waaaahh fascist!" Their methods are quite heavy handed, but the bottom line is that people keep stealing their shiat


Almost everything I download is copies of obscure stuff I bought in the 80's, and is no longer published on the open market. My cassettes wore out, and that stuff has never been recorded on any other format that I can find. Should I just kiss my old music (that I already bought) goodbye, or should I still be entitled to what I purchased? You want receipts after a quarter-century? Fark you.
 
2012-03-16 05:20:29 AM  

TheOmni: So I've been thinking about this and I'm a little stumped. What exactly can I (or we) do about this. It's not a law, so contacting my representatives doesn't seem to be an option. My ISP holds a monopoly on internet service and even if they didn't it looks like most of the major ones are joining in on this scheme. The RIAA and MPAA are anti-consumer lobbying organizations, so there's not really much I can do about them. So ... what should be done?


Pay $7 or so a month for VPN service to a foreign server in Switzerland or Germany. Connect to the VPN server whenever you're downloading.

I do this regardless as I find Netflix will often work better when the traffic goes all the farking way to Germany and back than if Comcast knows that it's Netflix traffic.

/can't wait for open whitespace wireless
//they'll prolly lobby congress to make a law to ban it
 
2012-03-16 05:27:15 AM  

Mike_LowELL: I like how people think that the RIAA is some soulless corporation that tries to profit at any cost necessary. They are a business. It is their job to profit at any cost necessary.


I hear this bs a lot. No, it isn't. Businesses, as with people aren't just supposed to be sociopathic nutjobs no matter what the "but it works better in the long run" Randian idiotic keep chanting.

Like anything, capitalism works well in many cases but it's not some infallible code of conduct that will always result in good things. And businesses, like people should weigh the pros and cons of the "it's just business" mentality based on the situation at hand.
 
2012-03-16 05:28:21 AM  

Nadie_AZ: They asked her to let everyone around her at school/home/whatever pirate it. They understand this is the best method for getting their music known to more and more people. Word of mouth is a big deal in business. You know that.


The Grateful Dead nod knowingly.
 
2012-03-16 05:34:14 AM  
www.the-monkey.net
 
2012-03-16 06:01:13 AM  
I wholeheartedly advocate that if you have access to a government PC, download what you want from that PC and let them cut off the government PC. Should be good for a laugh.
 
Displayed 50 of 254 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter








In Other Media
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report