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(Digital Trends)   RIAA says major ISPs set to turn into copyright police by July, throttling bandwidth and cutting off internet access to customers who are suspected of downloading copyrighted content illegally   ( digitaltrends.com) divider line
    More: Scary, ISPs, RIAA, environmental mitigation, automated system  
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5793 clicks; posted to Geek » on 16 Mar 2012 at 4:25 AM (5 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-03-16 08:55:40 AM  

Three Crooked Squirrels: But you say they have the means to go after the violaters. Do they? There are millions and millions of them. Can they really go after all of them? And when they do, they are faced with article after article of "Can you believe they went after a 12 year old girl?" when at the same time, no one would care if the same girl were arrested for stealing a pack of gum.


It isn't because they went after a 12yr old girl, it's because they're claiming $150,000 for each song that 12yr girl downloaded. No one would've blinked an eye at any of this if they were claiming $2 for each song, they'd just think "hey, they're just getting their money."

But that's the problem and why the anti-RIAA sentiment is so strong--they KNOW $150,000 for each song is ludicrous, which is why they generally settle cases for $3,000, but they're claiming it for two reasons:
1. To blame piracy for their losses (the number looks bigger if you value each song at $150,000).
2. To try and regulate the consumers by fear (don't download or you'll owe us $1.92 million in damages.)

It's because of #2 above that I will actively do everything I can to ensure no label who signs with the RIAA gets a dollar of my money. Not only are they sticking to a dying business model, as every pointed out here, but they're managing to get away with such excessive penalties for their falsely over-stated losses from #1. Why? Because they're a huge lobbying group (not to mention, RIAA lobbyists are getting jobs as federal judges, then apparently ruling on RIAA-cases...conflict of interests, maybe?). No matter what model the RIAA adapts now, the hatred has gotten to big to ever support them and their efforts.

Lastly, I like to post this quote from Lawrence Lessig for all who think piracy is killing the industry. Note, it's a little out of date now, as iTunes and whatnot are available now so CD sales are probably all but squashed by comparison, but it's an interesting point to those who think copyright infringement = stealing.

"In 2002, the RIAA reported that CD sales had fallen by 8.9 percent, from 882 million to 803 million units; revenues fell 6.7 percent. This confirms a trend over the past few years. The RIAA blames Internet piracy for the trend, though there are many other causes that could account for this drop. SoundScan, for example, reports a more than 20 percent drop in the number of CDs released since 1999. That no doubt accounts for some of the decrease in sales... But let's assume the RIAA is right, and all of the decline in CD sales is because of Internet sharing. Here's the rub: In the same period that the RIAA estimates that 803 million CDs were sold, the RIAA estimates that 2.1 billion CDs were downloaded for free. Thus, although 2.6 times the total number of CDs sold were downloaded for free, sales revenue fell by just 6.7 percent... [So] there is a huge difference between downloading a song and stealing a CD."
 
2012-03-16 08:58:46 AM  
pshaw, this is so 2 years ago for me.

I have a little po-dunk ISP who I guess felt the RIAA's arm bending early. We were dropped to a lower bandwidth plan and told if it happened again we'd lose service all together. Since I have no other options for internet, we gritted our teeth and quit downloading stuff.

I'm still pissed about the whole thing.
 
2012-03-16 08:59:36 AM  
There aren't that many places where it's really only one ISP option anymore. Ignoring the complaints and bad word of mouth from people who lie and say they were throttled when they weren't really doing anything, and even ignoring they themselves switching, I'm willing to bet this adds enough extra problems to any ISP that whichever ISP doesn't do it will win the ISP wars pretty handily.
 
2012-03-16 08:59:44 AM  
"If copyright infringing activity continues still, the ISP then reserves the right to throttle Web access speeds, or cut off a subscriber's Internet access altogether, at least until that user..."

...switches ISP.
 
2012-03-16 09:01:50 AM  

StoneColdAtheist: At least downloaded music looks to be reasonably priced for what you get. I used to download Kindle books to read on my laptop, but in recent years the price has risen to about $10 a pop, for a product that has essentially zero marginal cost. Hell, at least with a paperback I have something tangible that has an inherent cost to produce and distribute.


I tend to get music from iTunes cause they actually sell some of the music I really like listening to. I couldn't get some of the music I liked in CD stores. And they are cheap too, $10 for, on occasion, 40 songs.
 
2012-03-16 09:01:50 AM  

inkblot:
Adapt to what, people downloading whatever they want and hoping that a few people are kind of enough to throw some money their way? People like you want to turn artists into bums, who depend on people to spend more than $0 or music or movies.


Adapt to this.

I know someone with a somewhat-sound proof spare room, a computer grinding away to record everything, decent (if outdated) mic's, synth's & sequences all brought on fleabay, my Atari ST running notator (MIDI-in, MIDI-out fark yeah... knew the old girl still had it in her). They write their own music.

People like their shiat. They put it up for sale all on their own in formats people like and they make money.

I understand that iTunes and Amazon MP3 are more than happy to sell indie stuff, although they take a cut themselves obviously.

Same thing is happening in video as well, Kickstarters for TV shows, movies. YouTube has enabled people like TotalBiscuit to keep a roof over his head... I, personally, may not be able to out edit a full Hollywood editing suite run by a team of experienced editors but then I won't be charging the same price for my content and I will have done the absolute best my skill allows.

Adapt or die and don't bother trying to pull the starving artist card again it was bullshiat in the days of the wandering minstrel and it's bullshiat now.
 
2012-03-16 09:02:49 AM  
As a consumer, all I as is that you meet me halfway. Yes, piracy is a problem, but you're ignoring the people who want to give you money. Make your show available on your website the same day it airs on TV. Let me buy movies the day it leaves the theater. Don't prosecute people who love your artists and just are trying to get more people to listen to them.

Oh, and most piracy occurs at your production facilities overseas. If you had kept your factories in America you'd have a much easier time controlling them. That's your own damn fault.
 
2012-03-16 09:03:57 AM  
As I was taking back my first Redbox movie in ages I came to the realization that if they streamed me new movies for $1 or $1.50 each I would never pirate a movie ever again. I watch maybe a movie or 2 a week and for the cost I would rather pay to be legal than to pirate.
 
2012-03-16 09:04:27 AM  
Odd, this announcement by the RIAA immediately brought forth an image of Baghdad Bob picketing with the Westboro Church people.

"There is no invasion! God is tearing this nation down! ISPs are gonna get you, you thief!"
 
2012-03-16 09:05:55 AM  

LowbrowDeluxe: There aren't that many places where it's really only one ISP option anymore. Ignoring the complaints and bad word of mouth from people who lie and say they were throttled when they weren't really doing anything, and even ignoring they themselves switching, I'm willing to bet this adds enough extra problems to any ISP that whichever ISP doesn't do it will win the ISP wars pretty handily.


Outside of major metro areas I think it is pretty common, and in major metro areas if you live in an apt/condo you may only have one choice.
 
2012-03-16 09:07:35 AM  

Three Crooked Squirrels: Pay for it if you like it.


Except for the stuff they hold copyright on that they don`t release copies of...

It`s only major ISPs anyway, just go with a smaller one that gives two fingers to the fascists coonts.
 
2012-03-16 09:11:02 AM  
When's the last time we had a corporate shill thread this good?
 
2012-03-16 09:11:45 AM  
Here`s a thought, how about, if you wish to retain copyright, you HAVE to copy it and make it available for purchase at the recognised market value (no silly prices to stop demand). Ownership through usage or something like that. If you don`t want to sell it then people can copy it by default.

Then there will not be the situation where to get a copy of a particular product you are forced to break the law. It will be available through legal means, strengthening the case for stopping piracy.

Win-Win.
 
2012-03-16 09:12:59 AM  

dready zim:

It`s only major ISPs anyway, just go with a smaller one that gives two fingers to the fascists coonts.


You sound like everyone has a choice on their ISP. I have no choice to select Comcast as my ISP. No access to DSL, or FIOS, and there is no way I am using cell internet. I could go dialup but jesus who want's that. There is no other cable provider in my area.
 
2012-03-16 09:15:00 AM  

Three Crooked Squirrels: If the industry chooses not to adapt and makes a poor business decision, it will suffer the consequences. That doesn't mean you have the right to steal from a poor businessman.


Maybe not, but the poor businessman also needs to understand that if the industry chooses not to adapt and makes a poor business decision, they will be treated with the same lack of respect and people will feel no pressure to avoid stealing the product instead. Start a one-size-fits-all punishment system where anyone even suspected of theft is punished, and you remove the last reason anyone has to not steal the content. If I'm punished either way, I might as well get something out of it.

Now kindly stop white-knighting for them. They won't give you a job as a reward. And they'll still throttle you for "suspected" theft.
 
2012-03-16 09:15:13 AM  
It`s often a case of people who would not give money to a company are STILL not giving them money. How can that be theft? There is no change in the situation except for one party has something they didn`t before without costing the other party anything at all.
 
2012-03-16 09:16:36 AM  
ITT: People reenacting a Republican primary debate.
 
2012-03-16 09:18:38 AM  

swaxhog: Naesen: Waiiiiit a second. What are they "monitoring?" Bandwidth use? Specific IPs you communicate with? What sets off the flag?

liam76: How do they know what they are downloading is illegal?

They have people/companies that join the torrents floating around. Once you're in the torrent you can see the ip's of your peers. Then collect this info, and ship out notices to the isp's who own these addresses who can see which user had that ip on that date.

Using software like Peerblock can help but it's not 100% protective. Better to use a seedbox.


Oh so they're not doing anything new. That's good. I was under the impression the ISP itself had a cluster of machines the users had to pass through which monitored all the data and was thinking how that was even possible.
 
2012-03-16 09:22:17 AM  

PanicMan:
Oh, and most piracy occurs at your production facilities overseas.


I once pointed that out in a Fark thread, that there are illegal pressing plants running 24/7 to feed the bootleg markets and shipping fakes that are exceptionally hard to tell from the genuine the resounding call was 'bullshiat' you my friend are aruging against the will of the internets.

CSB.

I have a bootleg of Windows XP Pro right here, it came in OEM flavour shrink wrap (I was building a system, I complied with the license), had the holograms and stickers, CD key worked, etc, etc. Worked well for a year until SP3 hit and it failed WGA. Now keep in mind that I was in all honesty oblivious to this being a bootleg, so I'm the victim here as far as I can tell along with Microsoft. What was Microsoft's solution to this problem?

Give us £70. How much did an OEM of XP Pro cost at that time? £70. They got the finger and my my machine got Ubuntu, until it broke, then I brought a Mac. I'm not saying Microsoft shouldn't get something but the full RRP? For a string of letters & numbers... how about no. How about a discount if I ship you the bootleg as proof I got taken for a ride as much as you guys?

/CSB
 
2012-03-16 09:22:43 AM  

TNel: dready zim:

It`s only major ISPs anyway, just go with a smaller one that gives two fingers to the fascists coonts.

You sound like everyone has a choice on their ISP. I have no choice to select Comcast as my ISP. No access to DSL, or FIOS, and there is no way I am using cell internet. I could go dialup but jesus who want's that. There is no other cable provider in my area.


I was trying to sound like most people who don`t live 3 days travel up the styx and refuse to compromise have a choice. My cell internet connects at over 10Mbps and is completely unlimited. Your results may vary. I am not Amish, I live in civilisation. I have access to many many ISPs and at least four options for cell internet at broadband speeds, most people do. If you choose to live free from most of the crap that population density brings don`t moan if you don`t get the benefits.

Self imposed restrictions are self imposed.
 
2012-03-16 09:23:41 AM  

swaxhog: Better to use a seedbox.


What is this `seedbox` of which you speak?
 
2012-03-16 09:25:13 AM  

TheOmni: Three Crooked Squirrels: This thread is full of "waaaahh fascist!" Their methods are quite heavy handed, but the bottom line is that people keep stealing their shiat, and technology has made it very easy to do. Stop stealing their shiat. Pay for it if you like it. And if you don't like it, like apparently Winkologist hasn't in 14 years, don't download it. Its a pretty shiatty excuse to say "The music hasn't been good since 1998, so I decided to steal it rather than pay for it. Sure it sucked, but I just had to have it. But you better be damn sure I wasn't going to pay for it!"

I'm sorry that the future is arriving without you or the legacy content controllers. It's something you will have to deal with.


That's junk.

Just because it's easy to do doesn't mean it's right. Stealing off tables in farmer's markets is easy.
 
2012-03-16 09:26:30 AM  

liam76: How do they know what they are downloading is illegal?


Deep packet inspection. Quasi-legal and blatantly against net neutrality but it's U.S. companies and the U.S. government we're talking about here.
 
2012-03-16 09:31:05 AM  

dready zim: swaxhog: Better to use a seedbox.

What is this `seedbox` of which you speak?


Here's an example: Link (new window)
 
2012-03-16 09:31:05 AM  

DKinMN:
Just because it's easy to do doesn't mean it's right. Stealing off tables in farmer's markets is easy.


I suggest, before posting in these threads, you go off and do some research. The French anti-piracy group had to release a report last year that quite clearly showed the people who are busy emptying your virtual tables in to the back of their virtual Volvo's are exactly the same people making lots of purchases on Amazon, iTunes and other digital download services.

The RIAA and MPAA are pissing off their best customers.
 
2012-03-16 09:31:09 AM  

a9735z: liam76: How do they know what they are downloading is illegal?

Deep packet inspection. Quasi-legal and blatantly against net neutrality but it's U.S. companies and the U.S. government we're talking about here.


Would it work if you connect through a VPN?
 
kab
2012-03-16 09:32:09 AM  

Weaver95: why do you defend an outdated business model?


People paying for entertainment is an outdated business model?

Who knew?
 
2012-03-16 09:33:39 AM  

DKinMN: Just because it's easy to do doesn't mean it's right. Stealing off tables in farmer's markets is easy.


Good thing then that copyright infringement =/= theft.

You're not talking about tangible goods or services when talking about digital content. So again: There is no tangible good being taken from the original owner and the original owner is not "deprived of using the copyrighted work or exercising the exclusive rights held".
 
2012-03-16 09:34:21 AM  

dready zim: TNel: dready zim:

It`s only major ISPs anyway, just go with a smaller one that gives two fingers to the fascists coonts.

You sound like everyone has a choice on their ISP. I have no choice to select Comcast as my ISP. No access to DSL, or FIOS, and there is no way I am using cell internet. I could go dialup but jesus who want's that. There is no other cable provider in my area.

I was trying to sound like most people who don`t live 3 days travel up the styx and refuse to compromise have a choice. My cell internet connects at over 10Mbps and is completely unlimited. Your results may vary. I am not Amish, I live in civilisation. I have access to many many ISPs and at least four options for cell internet at broadband speeds, most people do. If you choose to live free from most of the crap that population density brings don`t moan if you don`t get the benefits.

Self imposed restrictions are self imposed.


I am not amish either and live in a fairly large city in central PA. FIOS isn't in our developement and DSL hasn't been run in years since not many people use it. Clear Wireless is available but gets bad reviews, if you game you will not want cell internet due to very high latency. Not everyone lives in the largest cities in the US where you have the choice.
 
2012-03-16 09:35:55 AM  

Carth: Would it work if you connect through a VPN?


As long as it's encrypted (which they almost always are) and you know what's at the other end, then no they shouldn't be able to do deep packet inspection. It all depends on how secure your VPN is and how much you trust them.
 
2012-03-16 09:37:29 AM  
You know your congressman? See if she/he is funded by the RIAA/MPAA. If so, vote their ass out.

Hint: Your Vice President is funded by both.
 
2012-03-16 09:37:53 AM  

DKinMN: TheOmni: Three Crooked Squirrels: This thread is full of "waaaahh fascist!" Their methods are quite heavy handed, but the bottom line is that people keep stealing their shiat, and technology has made it very easy to do. Stop stealing their shiat. Pay for it if you like it. And if you don't like it, like apparently Winkologist hasn't in 14 years, don't download it. Its a pretty shiatty excuse to say "The music hasn't been good since 1998, so I decided to steal it rather than pay for it. Sure it sucked, but I just had to have it. But you better be damn sure I wasn't going to pay for it!"

I'm sorry that the future is arriving without you or the legacy content controllers. It's something you will have to deal with.

That's junk.

Just because it's easy to do doesn't mean it's right. Stealing off tables in farmer's markets is easy.


That may be true, in the abstract - but the fact that you don't think something is "right" doesn't mean people aren't going to do it - especially when there isn't any practical or economically viable way to stop them.
The fact is, we are watching the end of an industry. The intellectual property industry is not a fact of nature or human culture. It has, in fact, only existed for about 175 years.
Before the invention and popularization of offset printing, lithograph, photography, etc. - there was no money to be made owning other people's intelectual product. But the need for mass distribution of mass produced media made them necessary. Now, the digital distribution of media is making them unnecessary. The artists can actually make more money without them, and they serve no function at this point.
The intellectual property industry has probably reached the end of it's very short life, and I don't see any reason to mourne it's passing.
You can argue all day like some jesuit or rabbinical student about "right" and "wrong" - but it won't make any difference - darwin always wins.
 
2012-03-16 09:38:10 AM  

machoprogrammer: You know your congressman? See if she/he is funded by the RIAA/MPAA. If so, vote their ass out.

Hint: Your Vice President is funded by both.


I should say, but don't vote Republican just to spite Biden. Odds are they are funded by MPAA/RIAA, too.
 
2012-03-16 09:38:21 AM  

Carth:
Would it work if you connect through a VPN?


Nope. All it would know is that some form of encrypted traffic was going through, what that traffic was it can't tell... could be a corporate VPN, could be a torrent... could be someone trying to watch Hulu/Netflix/iPlayer from the 'wrong' country.

If it could tell and the people selling the kit made mention of their DPI systems being able to break encryption and peek inside... ISP's would have to deal with an 800Lb gorilla of pissed off corporations; they don't like it when they're spied on and potentially business sensitive information goes 'where ever'.
 
2012-03-16 09:39:28 AM  
This thread (like all piracy/copyright infringement threads on Fark) is conflating two separate things. Debating the morality of copyright infringement is an entirely separate can of worms.

Why the hell can so many people not get it through their thick skulls that copyright infringment and theft are completely different things?

Not to bring up politics but I get the feeling that they are the same people who think women have to take a "birth control pill" every time they have sex. The type of people who fail to grasp the basic fundamentals of the issue being discussed.
 
2012-03-16 09:40:09 AM  
What about meshnet?

Or am I 'tarded?
 
kab
2012-03-16 09:43:00 AM  

a9735z: You're not talking about tangible goods or services when talking about digital content.


Give a call to Autodesk, Adobe, etc, and pose this argument. Let me know how that works out for you.
 
2012-03-16 09:45:22 AM  

Vaneshi: Nope. All it would know is that some form of encrypted traffic was going through, what that traffic was it can't tell... could be a corporate VPN, could be a torrent... could be someone trying to watch Hulu/Netflix/iPlayer from the 'wrong' country.

If it could tell and the people selling the kit made mention of their DPI systems being able to break encryption and peek inside... ISP's would have to deal with an 800Lb gorilla of pissed off corporations; they don't like it when they're spied on and potentially business sensitive information goes 'where ever'.


I generally try to approach topics like that with a devil's advocate perspective just so people don't feel more secure than they are, but in theory if a VPN is also being run over the same ISP or one of the ones that signed this "memorandum of understanding" horseshiat then I'm curious if they could be compelled to provide information on what they were sending client XYZ whose connection is provided by them as well.

My coffee is still brewing so my brain might no work gud
 
2012-03-16 09:45:42 AM  

dready zim: swaxhog: Better to use a seedbox.

What is this `seedbox` of which you speak?


Think of a seedbox as a remote torrent client. You get a certain about of disk space, speed and upload cap depending on the price. You connect usually with your browser to the client and add your torrents and let it do all the work. Then use sftp, or https or plain http if you want and download the results.

They are especially useful for when you need a ratio on certain sites that you can't manage with your normal isp. It's very easy to upload 1 TB on a seedbox and it has no affect on your internet caps.
 
2012-03-16 09:45:42 AM  
I suppose many will no longer need to pay for the fastest options.
 
2012-03-16 09:47:54 AM  
Ah well... Everything media-related sooner or later gets farked by corporate greed and/or stupidity.

Broadcast TV, radio, movies, & popular music are a few examples. It's only a matter of time before the internet turns into nothing more than an alacarte pay-per-view suckfest courtesy of the entertainment industry. I'm not talking about the pirating issue, either. I'm talking about incremental steps toward a future where choices are narrowed down to only "big entertainment-approved" content and every website (or maybe sets of websites) you look at will cost you $$$.

It's what they want. And corporate America usually gets what they want.
 
2012-03-16 09:48:01 AM  

Vaneshi: PanicMan:
Oh, and most piracy occurs at your production facilities overseas.

I once pointed that out in a Fark thread, that there are illegal pressing plants running 24/7 to feed the bootleg markets and shipping fakes that are exceptionally hard to tell from the genuine the resounding call was 'bullshiat' you my friend are aruging against the will of the internets.

CSB.

I have a bootleg of Windows XP Pro right here, it came in OEM flavour shrink wrap (I was building a system, I complied with the license), had the holograms and stickers, CD key worked, etc, etc. Worked well for a year until SP3 hit and it failed WGA. Now keep in mind that I was in all honesty oblivious to this being a bootleg, so I'm the victim here as far as I can tell along with Microsoft. What was Microsoft's solution to this problem?

Give us £70. How much did an OEM of XP Pro cost at that time? £70. They got the finger and my my machine got Ubuntu, until it broke, then I brought a Mac. I'm not saying Microsoft shouldn't get something but the full RRP? For a string of letters & numbers... how about no. How about a discount if I ship you the bootleg as proof I got taken for a ride as much as you guys?

/CSB


Are you sure it was actually a bootleg? I had that happen to me and my copy came from Microsoft.
 
2012-03-16 09:49:08 AM  
So how does work in cases of suspected pirating of materials?

For example, ROM downloaded. I believe the language states that if you have purchased and own the game, it is legal to own the ROM of the game. The ISP will most likely see my actions on ROMS4EVA.com and accuse me of illegal downloading. Enough traffic to said site would result in reduce and/or inactivated service. What then? A long expensive court battle to just have my connection re-established?

Or if someone supplies their own material (music, video, etc.) via torrents. ISP's won't see I'm downloading my friend's own material, they will see TORRENTSCUZFARKTHEMAN.com

It seems that the ISPs are overstepping their bounds by enforcing such punishment
 
2012-03-16 09:50:44 AM  

kab: a9735z: You're not talking about tangible goods or services when talking about digital content.

Give a call to Autodesk, Adobe, etc, and pose this argument. Let me know how that works out for you.


Again it would not be a tangible good or service.

Now if someone downloads an Adobe product or AutoCAD and uses that software to profit through a business then that's an entirely different can of worms. Still not tangible but there is monetary gain being made by a third party who has infringed on their copyright.

The only time you can legitimately claim there is a tangible component is if someone is downloading copies of AutoCAD, burning them to DVDs and selling them. But if you are seriously claiming that there's a tangible component involved for people who dick around with Photoshop at home to make lolcat pictures? Good luck with that.
 
2012-03-16 09:52:48 AM  

change1211: Are you sure it was actually a bootleg? I had that happen to me and my copy came from Microsoft.


I had it happen quite frequently with OEM copies of XP (assuredly legal). If you reinstalled XP too frequently and tried to validate it (common for people who build their own computers, swap CPUs, OSes, etc) it would fail and you'd have to call their phone support. Each time they would re-validate it for me though.
 
2012-03-16 09:53:55 AM  
At first I was like, yea, right, major ISP's throttling bandwidth of "copyright" thieves. Then I was like, major ISP's throttling bandwidth of people who actually use their service and I can see it in a heartbeat.
 
2012-03-16 09:55:33 AM  

a9735z: change1211: Are you sure it was actually a bootleg? I had that happen to me and my copy came from Microsoft.

I had it happen quite frequently with OEM copies of XP (assuredly legal). If you reinstalled XP too frequently and tried to validate it (common for people who build their own computers, swap CPUs, OSes, etc) it would fail and you'd have to call their phone support. Each time they would re-validate it for me though.


First time it happened to me I had just built the computer, installed XP, validated, installed some updates, it tried to revalidate and failed. I was a bit less than pleased.
 
2012-03-16 09:58:12 AM  

maniacbastard: What about meshnet?

Or am I 'tarded?


On Reddit they were/are looking to build a mesh network. The problem is that works really well when it's a small group of people who are close together (because everyone needs to talk/see everyone else on the network). SOHO kit (like your Wifi router) can sustain that many connections before they RAM out and crash.

If ISP's manage to kill torrents (and by extension all digital download services, remember the pirates are the best customers) I'd suggest you buy a gaming rig. Then go explore your local LAN Party with it.

LAN's used to be hotbeds of copying until a few of the larger ones killed SMB (the protocol Windows uses for it's shares) traffic... they will return to being hotbeds of piracy. If they don't I'd suggest you go snoop around your local market for the guy selling BluRay's stuffed full of ISO's, because he'll be back.

Nothing will kill piracy only the method of distribution will change.
 
2012-03-16 09:59:00 AM  
The entire "piracy" argument (or more so actions taken against it) is an exercise in futility anyway.

You cannot stop file sharing. It's impossible. Even if you locked down the net into some ultra-restrictive, archaic system where everyone was 100% identifiable 100% of the time (like Google's Eric Schmidt has gone on record saying he wants) you still couldn't stop it.

What are you going to do set up South Park-esque TSA agents in everyone's office to make sure no one swaps USB sticks?

The absolute best you can do is incentivize legal purchases by charging reasonable prices and ensuring simple, quality delivery methods with good support systems. That beats piracy hands down.

Look at Steam. Ignoring companies that install secondary and tertiary DRM bullshiat (looking at you Rockstar), companies that simply sell through Steam without extra DRM bullshiat with good pricing do incredibly well (assuming a quality product with demand). Valve has even shown their raw data on how pricing affects sales and total revenue.

The old sales paradigm of yore is irrelevant. As are most of the laws that go along with it. Adapt or whine. Many have simply chosen to whine.
 
2012-03-16 10:01:33 AM  

change1211: a9735z: change1211: Are you sure it was actually a bootleg? I had that happen to me and my copy came from Microsoft.

I had it happen quite frequently with OEM copies of XP (assuredly legal). If you reinstalled XP too frequently and tried to validate it (common for people who build their own computers, swap CPUs, OSes, etc) it would fail and you'd have to call their phone support. Each time they would re-validate it for me though.

First time it happened to me I had just built the computer, installed XP, validated, installed some updates, it tried to revalidate and failed. I was a bit less than pleased.


At that point if all else fails just give the validator the finger, crack it and block the phone home out-going attempts on your router. I mean in a case where you actually believed you had purchased a legitimate copy (seeing as it had validated plenty of times before), MS can take their "gimme $70" and shove it.
 
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